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Black Hills Deer Camp
04-13-2006, 07:51 AM
A new puppy (Golden Retriever) to join our family this weekend. What I lacked in training knowledge and skill, patience and equipment when training our last beloved Golden, I hope to transcend this go around. That said, I would appreciate any insight on a very, very basic; whistles.

My "Wolters" books ("Game Dog") reference whistle and trill whistle signals. More specifically, it suggests using the "COME" command in conjunction with blowing the "trill" whistle signal. Whistle signals used in conjunction with other voice commands and hand signals, e.g. "SIT" (or stop in your tracks at a flush) and a "GO" signal to release the dog or send it off on a retrieve, are referenced respectively as one and two "blasts" on a whistle.

I used only one whistle, a knock off of the Original Roy Gonia Special with a pea, with my last hunting companion. I note that many trainers seem to use two whistles and would like to know precisely what these are or, at least, are recommended. What, for example, are the benefits of a two whistle system? And, what is the difference between the two? What are the advantages/disadvantages of with pea or without pea?

Thanks, in advance, for any and all assistance!

Jim Coggins
04-13-2006, 02:40 PM
For those of us living in northern climates and training in the winter, two whistles are necessary in case one freezes. I guess I carry a secondary in case the primary breaks but icing up is the main reason. Plus, it looks cool.
Jim

meleagris
04-13-2006, 03:12 PM
My "Wolters" books ("Game Dog")

I think many people have 2 whistles because a whistle can fail. This failure usually occurs at the worst possible time. Some people now also combine a "short range" whistle (gonia type) with a "long range" (ie the new Green Monster). For most, the Gonia mega whistle in clear is the best whistle going.

Now back to the quote above. If you're serious about training a nice dog, I would arm yourself with a better reference. Best place for Wolters books is under a stack of other books. Check out the 10 Minute Retriever (available in most bookstores) or Smartwork series (esp vol 1) books (google Rush Creek Press or Lion Country Supply). For young dogs there is an awesome video by Jackie Mertens called Sound Beginnings (YBS Media) which would probably help you.

John
________
LovelyWendie99 (http://www.lovelywendie99.com/)

Greg Seddon
04-13-2006, 03:40 PM
My "Wolters" books ("Game Dog")

Now back to the quote above. If you're serious about training a nice dog, I would arm yourself with a better reference. Best place for Wolters books is under a stack of other books. Check out the 10 Minute Retriever (available in most bookstores) or Smartwork series (esp vol 1) books (google Rush Creek Press or Lion Country Supply). For young dogs there is an awesome video by Jackie Mertens called Sound Beginnings (YBS Media) which would probably help you.

John

Here is a place you can get the Smartwork Series
http://www.gundogsupply.com/evan-graham-smartwork-smartfetch.html

or

http://www.rushcreekpress.com/pages/899089/index.htm

The 10 minute Retriever http://www.gundogsupply.com/b10mirehowto.html

Sound Beginnings Retriever Training by Jackie Mertens
http://ybsmedia.com/jackiemertens.html

WingshooterMN
04-14-2006, 10:22 AM
Are asking about using two different whistles? I know of some guys that use a Gonia, tornado, or similar for retriever training, but use a Pealess whistle too when they are doing upland work. Definitely keep the other handy while doing upland work in case you need to do a blind or something. Never heard of using different whistles strictly for retriever training though.

Losthwy
05-08-2006, 07:01 PM
Second that of the Wolters book there is some good basic info in it, but it is NOT a good book to TRAIN a dog. Lardy's Vol I and Vol II are very good. Many like the Smartwork as well. Wolters is grade school the others are university text books. Back to whistles I like the "Green Monster" for it is the loudest and has no pee to freeze, though it is ugly. P.S. There was a good article I read the other day on MODULATING the volume while whistling. Soft toot while close in and belt it out at a distance. Which is were a really loud model can be a benefit. A dog running thru water at 225 yd might not be able to hear all models.

John Gassner
06-02-2006, 02:33 PM
I agree with the others. Wolters does have some good ideas, but most are dated, and there are much better sources available.

His idea of a whistle command to leave ( go -back) has fortunately gone away. All but unheard of now.

The Gonia whistles are still good. Use a Mega if you would like to save your own hearing and/or you need the extra distance. If maximum distance is desired, and you don't mind becoming prematurely deaf, then the Green Monster wins!

As others have said-the pea or pea-less models both work. You just don't have to worry as much about malfunctions with the pea-less models. Especially in freezing conditions.


Good Luck

John

DeltaDawg
06-02-2006, 06:49 PM
For Training puppeies I Use the Roy Gonia with out the pea, I find that pups ears are tuned into this whistle. Also, You can actaully make sound like it's really your own lips whistling them in, it just takes a little practice. Since I live in in West Coast of Canada I also have multiple whistles, just in case of frost and what have you. As far as reading material is concerned look for " HOW TO HELP GUNDOGS TRAIN THEMSELVES" by Joan Bailey. It might be out of print so look aroun Ebay, Amazon, Chapters/Indigo. Good Luck with your pup and let me know if this helps you. :D