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tshuntin
02-15-2009, 06:00 PM
On the 60 minute show tonight they are supposed to be doing a segment on the Buy American Plan. I am interested to watch it as they did some of their filming from one on my companies steel mills and our CEO, Dan DiMicco is was interviewed for some of it as well.

I will be interested to hear your thoughts afterwards....

kjrice
02-15-2009, 10:05 PM
On the 60 minute show tonight they are supposed to be doing a segment on the Buy American Plan. I am interested to watch it as they did some of their filming from one on my companies steel mills and our CEO, Dan DiMicco is was interviewed for some of it as well.

I will be interested to hear your thoughts afterwards....
Then they should stop whoring out jobs overseas, which has run rampant in the tech sector. I spend half of my day anymore fixing crap work from IBM Global Services and HP/EDS from India and Brazil only to wait around again for the next big layoff. I'd gladly pay a little more on my bill to keep it in-house instead of a technical sweat shop.

Good luck finding much of anything not having a Made in China sticker. Even 18/10 stainless steel flatware pits and tarnishes...more crap. We've returned 4 different sets back to Bed Bath and Beyond, while our old set (non-Chinese) wears like true 18/10. When will it end?

gsc
02-15-2009, 10:09 PM
I work for the State of Alaska DOT and we haven't bought any foreign steel for years. There is already a buy American law on the books. Its been there for years. Not sure what the fuss is about.

tshuntin
02-15-2009, 11:07 PM
I work for the State of Alaska DOT and we haven't bought any foreign steel for years. There is already a buy American law on the books. Its been there for years. Not sure what the fuss is about.

My understanding is it does not get enforced.

KJrice, who is the "they" you are talking about in your post? By the way, I almost tried to get a hold of you last week. I was in your neck of the woods but, ended up driving back up to St George a night instead of LV again. One of these times...

kjrice
02-15-2009, 11:42 PM
They being American businesses with the blessing of our elected criminals. It was pointed at the 60 Minutes show.

I like St George and have to go there for my nieces graduation from college in May. Might go check out Eastman's mule deer tour in March too. Whenever your schedule permits...

tshuntin
02-16-2009, 11:35 AM
They being American businesses with the blessing of our elected criminals. It was pointed at the 60 Minutes show.

I like St George and have to go there for my nieces graduation from college in May. Might go check out Eastman's mule deer tour in March too. Whenever your schedule permits...

That is who I thought you meant by 'they'. I just wanted to make sure you didn't mean my company. As you could tell from the show, we are very pro keeping jobs in America.

Vicki Worthington
02-18-2009, 03:20 PM
I work for the Federal Government (quasi--I actually work for a Government Management & Operating Contractor). The Buy American Act is pretty much lip service to allow politicians to say they "did something" to protect American industry and maintain the balance of trade.

Here is how it works:

If you need to buy something (anything) using federal tax dollars, you must include the Buy American Act clause in the solicitation for offers/request for quotations. Prospective bidders/offerors are required to certify that:

a. The product is manufactured in the US or its Territories;

b. The product is made up of components that are at least 51% mined or produced in the US and it Territories;

c. The product is made of US components but assembled outside the US;

d. The product is produced in a foreign country.

Once the buyer/contract specialist receives the bids or proposals, they must first check that they have--

a. Received offers for domestic goods (a or b, above);

b. Received a combination of domestic and foreing manufactured goods;

c. Received NO domestic offers of US products.

Next, if the answer is "a" offers for only domestic goods, award is made to the lowest price vendor whose offer conforms to the requirements of the solicitation.

If the answer is "b"--both foreign and domestic offers, an evaluation factor is applied to assist the domestic offer in being the lowest price offer (10% of the foreign price is added back in to artificially inflate it for evaluation purposes only). If the domestic offer is low AND conforms to the stated requirements, award is made to the domestic firm. If it is still not low, award of the contract is made to the firm offering the foreign item.

If the answer is "c" -- no domestically produced goods are offered, the buyer makes a "determination of non-availability" and awards to the firm offering the lowest priced, conforming item. If the value of the award for the foreign item exceeds $100,000.00 a Federal Contracting Officer must approve prior to award. To date, no proposed foreign award has ever been "disapproved".

Unfortunately, most of the high-dollar scientific equipment, or laboratory equipment--where millions are spent by the Department of Energy Laboratories daily, there truly is NO DOMESTIC SOURCE OF SUPPLY. Our egregious trade policies have completely eroded our manufacturing base in this country. Given rising labor costs vs. cheap foreign labor, its easy to ship our industry offshore.

Ken Newcomb
02-18-2009, 03:29 PM
tshuntin;

NUCOR is also big here but be not completely fooled by the statement that they haven't laid off anyone. I don't know about your area but here NUCOR keeps the people they need no matter on their payroll and they employ tons of temp help (which they didn't use to do) and those people get let go all the time based on need. Good business? YES Do they never lay people off? DEPENDS ON HOW YOU LOOK AT IT

Still a good company don't get me wrong.

Eric Johnson
02-18-2009, 03:29 PM
Vicki-

If I recall correstly, doesn't the 51% have to include any shipment on US vs. foreign hulls?

Eric

Vicki Worthington
02-18-2009, 03:33 PM
Eric,

Generally no one worries about domestic shipping vessels or air carriers unless the purchase is not considered "commercial". If it is foreign components being imported for assembly in the US, Customs is responsible for assuring compliance on all imports.

The foreign evaluation factor is applied with and without duty included in the price.

Contracts awarded generally have a "use US vessels" clause included, but it generally only applies to shipments of goods valued in excess of $100,000.00.