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Ken Bora
05-11-2009, 09:00 AM
Is it time for the libertarian to rise up and be counted?
Have any of you taken the worlds smallest political quiz?


http://www.theadvocates.org/quizp/index.html (http://www.theadvocates.org/quizp/index.html)

Marvin S
05-11-2009, 11:03 AM
50% on personal - 100% on economic - makes me a Libertarian Conservative.

I don't believe drugs are victimless, but do believe that if there was a will among law enforcement the problem would go away. They benefit by not solving the problem.

There should be a draft of sorts - might make some of the pansies that we all see into real men. :cool:

& there should be a national ID card - those of us who abide by the law are already held in more databases than we realize. Let's get the bad guys out in the open & out of here.

JMO

BonMallari
05-11-2009, 11:14 AM
50% personal....100% economic here

Ken Bora
05-11-2009, 11:35 AM
btw found out I am 100% P & 80% E

Patrick Johndrow
05-11-2009, 11:50 AM
60% personal and 100% economic

Ken Bora
05-11-2009, 12:01 PM
There should be a draft of sorts - might make some of the pansies that we all see into real men. :cool:
JMO
That could easily be accomplished if every teenager in the country worked a full year on a dairy farm. Northern climate so they can experience breaking ice and putting up hay in August. When it comes to the citizen I want my tax dollars to pay for to sit on the rocky outcrop looking for evil, I want somebody who
WANTS THE JOB!!!!!!!!!
Do you hire an underwater welder to make a wedding cake?
Ken Bora

Nor_Cal_Angler
05-11-2009, 12:17 PM
70% and 80%

Libertarian-Conservative...

GO firgure, lol

NCA

Juli H
05-11-2009, 12:24 PM
60 - 90

libertarian....

Juli

twall
05-11-2009, 12:47 PM
I got 80/100, libertarian. I am not a libertarian. The quiz was nice but too simplistic. There are positions the Libertarian party supports that I do not.

this makes me think back to a comment attributed to one of our contries founders. I don't know which one or, even if it is true. Our Constitution was written for a moral people. I do not support all the Libertarian parties social positions.

Tom

Pat G
05-11-2009, 12:58 PM
60 personal, 100 economic
Pat

subroc
05-11-2009, 01:02 PM
Is it time for the libertarian to rise up and be counted?

How would a libertarian rise up in a 2 party system?

badbullgator
05-11-2009, 01:23 PM
I got 80/100, libertarian. I am not a libertarian. The quiz was nice but too simplistic. There are positions the Libertarian party supports that I do not.

this makes me think back to a comment attributed to one of our contries founders. I don't know which one or, even if it is true. Our Constitution was written for a moral people. I do not support all the Libertarian parties social positions.

Tom

ANd you support all the Republican positions??? I do not, but am still a republican....mostly or maybe a Libertarian....or not

Franco
05-11-2009, 02:04 PM
I scored; Libertarian Conservative. Real conservatism borders on Libetarian ideals. Guess I should have voted for Ron Paul.

Anyway, the fastest growing party in America today is the Independant Party. Until the Republicans free themselves of the social issues they want to get mired in, they are doomed to defeat at the ballot box!

Cody Covey
05-11-2009, 02:18 PM
80/80 Libertarian

twall
05-11-2009, 02:23 PM
ANd you support all the Republican positions??? I do not, but am still a republican....mostly or maybe a Libertarian....or not

Nope!

Tom

Julie R.
05-11-2009, 03:18 PM
Your PERSONAL issues Score is 100%.
Your ECONOMIC issues Score is 90%.
According to your answers, the political group that agrees with you most is...
http://www.theadvocates.org/quizp/button%20libertarian.jpg

Not exactly a surprise....

duk4me
05-11-2009, 03:36 PM
I'm right square in the middle.........is that a good thing or bad thing or nothing?

Steve Amrein
05-11-2009, 03:44 PM
How long before the Libertarian party is actually a viable option that is not throwing a vote away. Same goes with the green party. Not much different than throwing a vote away for McCain as a conservative:rolleyes:

zeus3925
05-11-2009, 03:58 PM
I would love to see the Libertarians stand up and stop claiming they are Republicans.

Matt McKenzie
05-11-2009, 04:50 PM
I would love to see the Libertarians stand up and stop claiming they are Republicans.

I'm sure you would. That would be great for the liberals. Unfortunately, those of us who fall in the libertarian/conservative grey area are people without a party but are definitely against liberalism, so we don't have much of a choice. This may be difficult to believe, but many of us "on the right" are not bible-thumping hicks. Many of us believe in individual liberty, individual responsibility and strong national defense as key values. So we can chose between the Democrats who openly tell us that they don't believe in our values or the Republicans who lie to us and tell us that they do believe in our values. Either way, we're screwed.

Franco
05-11-2009, 05:04 PM
I'm sure you would. That would be great for the liberals. Unfortunately, those of us who fall in the libertarian/conservative grey area are people without a party but are definitely against liberalism, so we don't have much of a choice. This may be difficult to believe, but many of us "on the right" are not bible-thumping hicks. Many of us believe in individual liberty, individual responsibility and strong national defense as key values. So we can chose between the Democrats who openly tell us that they don't believe in our values or the Republicans who lie to us and tell us that they do believe in our values. Either way, we're screwed.

That is why the Independent Party movement is growing by leaps and bounds. The Republicans can't shake the Religious Right and the bible thumpers will ride the Republican party into oblivion. No matter how much damage Obomo does to this country, he knows he can do whatever he pleases because the Republicans have self-distructed. Obomo knows the Republicans are done, finished, finni. Many Repubs see Sarah Palin as thier hope for 2012. Though a very decent woman, she helped McCain loose it in 08 because her appeal is so narrow.

The only chance "intelligent" has in returning to DC is through a new party and America is waiting for a candidate that is not a puppet of the extreme left or Religious Right to emerge. We can start by sending 99% on both houses home in 2010 and bring in civilians who want to serve.

Matt McKenzie
05-11-2009, 05:18 PM
I would probably join the Libertarian Party if they weren't so weak on defense and foreign policy. The Republicans should have a perfect opportunity right now to get on point with a positive message of conservatism, but they don't have any leadership and they've blown any credibility they might have had by acting like fiscal liberals for the last few years. And the left has done a masterful job of painting conservatism as intolerant and uncaring. Much like the right did to the term "liberal". So the left has smartly dusted off the word "progressive" in an attempt to remove the liberal stigma. How will conservatives respond? How will the Republican Party respond? Who knows, but I sure don't see anything positive happening right now. Meanwhile the three stooges are running rampant and the American public is eating it up.

YardleyLabs
05-11-2009, 05:28 PM
100% on personal, 30% on economic. I guess that just leaves me as a flaming liberal. Anyone surprised??:p

zeus3925
05-11-2009, 05:43 PM
I'm sure you would. That would be great for the liberals. Unfortunately, those of us who fall in the libertarian/conservative grey area are people without a party but are definitely against liberalism, so we don't have much of a choice. This may be difficult to believe, but many of us "on the right" are not bible-thumping hicks. Many of us believe in individual liberty, individual responsibility and strong national defense as key values. So we can chose between the Democrats who openly tell us that they don't believe in our values or the Republicans who lie to us and tell us that they do believe in our values. Either way, we're screwed.

You're just proved what I suspected all along. The Republicans have been playing Libertarians and the Religious Right as suckers all along.

K.Bullock
05-11-2009, 05:49 PM
Your PERSONAL issues Score is 50%.
Your ECONOMIC issues Score is 70%.

Centrist :) Funny ...I don't feel like a centrist.

luvalab
05-11-2009, 06:08 PM
100 personal, 60 economic. Libertarian.

I remember taking this before and being 100/50, pushing me into the liberal category. Wonder what's changed? Perhaps I'm reacting to the last 6 months of government??

Patrick Johndrow
05-11-2009, 07:53 PM
100 personal, 60 economic. Libertarian.

I remember taking this before and being 100/50, pushing me into the liberal category. Wonder what's changed? Perhaps I'm reacting to the last 6 months of government??

This administration is going to make a lot of conservatives out of borderline people.

luvalab
05-11-2009, 08:25 PM
I did not say the last 3 months; I said the last 6 months.

Did that on purpose.

Not much is going to make me conservative until the conservatives change their approaches to some things. But I seem to have been nudged to libertarian by the governance of the left and the right working together.

(And actually, I do think they're working together, as much as their little playfights in public seem to entertain everyone, they're not fooling me...)

JDogger
05-11-2009, 08:33 PM
This administration is going to make a lot of conservatives out of borderline people.

Probably depends on your definition of borderline people :razz: Que no?

Steve
05-11-2009, 10:28 PM
Your PERSONAL issues Score is 100%.
Your ECONOMIC issues Score is 100%.

I voted mostly Libertarian in this last election although I held my nose and voted against Obammy (I voted for Palin and the old guy).

I do not agree with the foreign policy of many Libertarians. The philosophy is that we are hated in many other countries because of our interventionist policies. Whether that is correct or not, we are at war with radical Islamists and need to accept that and deal with it.

Hew
05-12-2009, 07:47 AM
That is why the Independent Party movement is growing by leaps and bounds. The Republicans can't shake the Religious Right and the bible thumpers will ride the Republican party into oblivion.
To which branch of the Indpendent Party do you refer? The one whose candidate for President was staunch anti-abortionist and very religious Alan Keyes, or the off-shoot branch of the Independent Party that put forth the Baptist Preacher/ex-Moral Majority leader at the top of their ticket for President?

Perhaps things will change, but right now nearly every political party organization beyond the Democrat and Republicans are run like disjointed cluster****s that make the political systems of third world banana republics look fair and organized by comparison. How much respect can one have for the Libertarian Party (not libertarian principles, but the Party) when they allow ex-Republican Bob Barr to walk into their convention and steal the Party's nomination from candidates who actually, ahem, campaigned for the nomination and participated in the primary process? And who was Barr's running mate? Wayne Alan Root, who up until the year before was a Republican. And really, how effective can the Libertarian Party ever be when the bulk of its membership eschew many of the necessary evils needed to effectively run a national party? It's akin to handing out a schedule of events at a three day Anarchist convention. If you want politicians to best represent your beliefs, at this time, far and away the best way to accomplish that is to work within either of the two major parties.

Lastly, the poll that started this thread is a poll put together by Libertarians. Is it any shock that most people are getting "results" that indicate a libertarian tilt? Here's my equally scientific (i.e. not at all) and equally meaningless poll:

Do you like breathing air that is untaxed? A M D
Do you think the US should be capable of defending itself? A M D
Parents are better suited than govt. to raise their children? A M D

If you answered A to two or more questions, you're a Conservative. Now if I can just work a link into my poll so that you can contribute money to me like the Libertarians did with their poll.

Bayou Magic
05-12-2009, 10:15 AM
Your PERSONAL issues Score is 40%.
Your ECONOMIC issues Score is 50%.

CENTRISTS

The questions are far too simplistic and limited. I would describe myself as a solid conservative...but what do I know.

fp

Marvin S
05-12-2009, 11:17 AM
To which branch of the Indpendent Party do you refer? The one whose candidate for President was staunch anti-abortionist and very religious Alan Keyes, or the off-shoot branch of the Independent Party that put forth the Baptist Preacher/ex-Moral Majority leader at the top of their ticket for President?

Perhaps things will change, but right now nearly every political party organization beyond the Democrat and Republicans are run like disjointed cluster****s that make the political systems of third world banana republics look fair and organized by comparison. How much respect can one have for the Libertarian Party (not libertarian principles, but the Party) when they allow ex-Republican Bob Barr to walk into their convention and steal the Party's nomination from candidates who actually, ahem, campaigned for the nomination and participated in the primary process? And who was Barr's running mate? Wayne Alan Root, who up until the year before was a Republican. And really, how effective can the Libertarian Party ever be when the bulk of its membership eschew many of the necessary evils needed to effectively run a national party? It's akin to handing out a schedule of events at a three day Anarchist convention. If you want politicians to best represent your beliefs, at this time, far and away the best way to accomplish that is to work within either of the two major parties.

Lastly, the poll that started this thread is a poll put together by Libertarians. Is it any shock that most people are getting "results" that indicate a libertarian tilt? Here's my equally scientific (i.e. not at all) and equally meaningless poll:

Do you like breathing air that is untaxed? A M D
Do you think the US should be capable of defending itself? A M D
Parents are better suited than govt. to raise their children? A M D

If you answered A to two or more questions, you're a Conservative. Now if I can just work a link into my poll so that you can contribute money to me like the Libertarians did with their poll.

Good post!

The major parties are disorganized enough, except when there is a threat from a 3rd party - they unite then.

Remember Ross Perot - good message - autocratic organization - DIED.

When Virginia Postrel was editor of Reason there was a good message that normal people could relate to, when she left that changed quickly. There are only portions of the Libertarian message that are not rehashes of the very Liberal Left.

The John Birch Society - portions of their message were correct - the delivery & the nutcases who fervently embraced the entire dogma of the society killed that one.

My thought is - we need to get people in office who know what it's like to earn what they have, who are not interested in mortgaging everyone's future for a series of feel good initiatives based on some mindless theory. Regardless of party.

JMO

Lisa S.
05-17-2009, 01:46 PM
Personal issues 70%
Economic issues 90%
Libertarian

Didn't need a quiz to tell me that though, figured it out last election cycle.

Sabireley
05-29-2009, 09:09 PM
I read this today in the LP news and thought it was worth sharing...

John Hasnas
Associate Professor
McDonough School of Business
Georgetown University

Political analysts frequently consider what it means to be a libertarian. In fact, in 1997, Charles Murray published a short book entitled "What It Means to Be a Libertarian" that does an excellent job of presenting the core principles of libertarian political philosophy. But almost no one ever discusses what it feels like to be a libertarian. How does it actually feel to be someone who holds the principles described in Murray’s book?

I’ll tell you. It feels bad. Being a libertarian means living with an almost unendurable level of frustration. It means being subject to unending scorn and derision despite being inevitably proven correct by events. How does it feel to be a libertarian? Imagine what the internal life of Cassandra must have been and you will have a pretty good idea.

Imagine spending two decades warning that government policy is leading to a major economic collapse, and then, when the collapse comes, watching the world conclude that markets do not work.

Imagine continually explaining that markets function because they have a built in corrective mechanism; that periodic contractions are necessary to weed out unproductive ventures; that continually loosening credit to avoid such corrections just puts off the day of reckoning and inevitably leads to a larger recession; that this is precisely what the government did during the 1920's that led to the great depression; and then, when the recession hits, seeing it offered as proof of the failure of laissez-faire capitalism.

Imagine spending years decrying federal intervention in the home mortgage market; pointing out the dangers associated with legislation such as the Community Reinvestment Act that forces lenders to make more risky loans than they otherwise would; testifying before Congress on the lack of oversight and inevitable insolvency of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to legislators who angrily respond either that one is "exaggerat[ing] a threat of safety and soundness . . . which I do not see" (Barney Frank) or "[I[f it ain’t broke, why do you want to fix it? Have the GSEs [government-sponsored enterprises] ever missed their housing goals" (Maxine Waters) or "[T[he problem that we have and that we are faced with is maybe some individuals who wanted to do away with GSEs in the first place" (Gregory Meeks) or that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are "one of the great success stories of all time" (Christopher Dodd); and arguing that the moral hazard created by the implicit federal backing of such privately-owned government-sponsored enterprises is likely to set off a wave of unjustifiably risky investments, and then, when the housing market implodes under the weight of bad loans, watching the collapse get blamed on the greed and rapaciousness of "Wall Street."

I remember attending a lecture at Georgetown in the mid-1990s given by a member of the libertarian Cato Institute in which he predicted that, unless changed, government policy would trigger an economic crisis by 2006. That prediction was obviously ideologically-motivated alarmism. After all, the crisis did not occur until 2008.

Libertarians spend their lives accurately predicting the future effects of government policy. Their predictions are accurate because they are derived from Hayek’s insights into the limitations of human knowledge, from the recognition that the people who comprise the government respond to incentives just like anyone else and are not magically transformed to selfless agents of the good merely by accepting government employment, from the awareness that for government to provide a benefit to some, it must first take it from others, and from the knowledge that politicians cannot repeal the laws of economics. For the same reason, their predictions are usually negative and utterly inconsistent with the utopian wishful-thinking that lies at the heart of virtually all contemporary political advocacy. And because no one likes to hear that he cannot have his cake and eat it too or be told that his good intentions cannot be translated into reality either by waving a magic wand or by passing legislation, these predictions are greeted not merely with disbelief, but with derision.

It is human nature to want to shoot the messenger bearing unwelcome tidings. And so, for the sin of continually pointing out that the emperor has no clothes, libertarians are attacked as heartless bastards devoid of compassion for the less fortunate, despicable flacks for the rich or for business interests, unthinking dogmatists who place blind faith in the free market, or, at best, members of the lunatic fringe.

Cassandra’s curse was to always tell the truth about the future, but never be believed. If you add to that curse that she would be ridiculed, derided, and shunned for making her predictions, you have a pretty fair approximation of what it feels like to be a libertarian.

If you’d like a taste of what it feels like to be a libertarian, try telling people that the incoming Obama Administration is advocating precisely those aspects of FDR’s New Deal that prolonged the great depression for a decade; that propping up failed and failing ventures with government money in order to save jobs in the present merely shifts resources from relatively more to relatively less productive uses, impedes the corrective process, undermines the economic growth necessary for recovery, and increases unemployment in the long term; and that any "economic" stimulus package will inexorably be made to serve political rather than economic ends, and see what kind of reaction you get. And trust me, it won’t feel any better five or ten years from now when everything you have just said has been proven true and Obama, like FDR, is nonetheless revered as the savior of the country.

Franco
05-29-2009, 09:47 PM
I read this today in the LP news and thought it was worth sharing...

John Hasnas
Associate Professor
McDonough School of Business
Georgetown University


Political analysts frequently consider what it means to be a libertarian. In fact, in 1997, Charles Murray published a short book entitled "What It Means to Be a Libertarian" that does an excellent job of presenting the core principles of libertarian political philosophy. But almost no one ever discusses what it feels like to be a libertarian. How does it actually feel to be someone who holds the principles described in Murray’s book?

I’ll tell you. It feels bad. Being a libertarian means living with an almost unendurable level of frustration. It means being subject to unending scorn and derision despite being inevitably proven correct by events. How does it feel to be a libertarian? Imagine what the internal life of Cassandra must have been and you will have a pretty good idea.

Imagine spending two decades warning that government policy is leading to a major economic collapse, and then, when the collapse comes, watching the world conclude that markets do not work.

Imagine continually explaining that markets function because they have a built in corrective mechanism; that periodic contractions are necessary to weed out unproductive ventures; that continually loosening credit to avoid such corrections just puts off the day of reckoning and inevitably leads to a larger recession; that this is precisely what the government did during the 1920's that led to the great depression; and then, when the recession hits, seeing it offered as proof of the failure of laissez-faire capitalism.

Imagine spending years decrying federal intervention in the home mortgage market; pointing out the dangers associated with legislation such as the Community Reinvestment Act that forces lenders to make more risky loans than they otherwise would; testifying before Congress on the lack of oversight and inevitable insolvency of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to legislators who angrily respond either that one is "exaggerat[ing] a threat of safety and soundness . . . which I do not see" (Barney Frank) or "[I[f it ain’t broke, why do you want to fix it? Have the GSEs [government-sponsored enterprises] ever missed their housing goals" (Maxine Waters) or "[T[he problem that we have and that we are faced with is maybe some individuals who wanted to do away with GSEs in the first place" (Gregory Meeks) or that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are "one of the great success stories of all time" (Christopher Dodd); and arguing that the moral hazard created by the implicit federal backing of such privately-owned government-sponsored enterprises is likely to set off a wave of unjustifiably risky investments, and then, when the housing market implodes under the weight of bad loans, watching the collapse get blamed on the greed and rapaciousness of "Wall Street."

I remember attending a lecture at Georgetown in the mid-1990s given by a member of the libertarian Cato Institute in which he predicted that, unless changed, government policy would trigger an economic crisis by 2006. That prediction was obviously ideologically-motivated alarmism. After all, the crisis did not occur until 2008.

Libertarians spend their lives accurately predicting the future effects of government policy. Their predictions are accurate because they are derived from Hayek’s insights into the limitations of human knowledge, from the recognition that the people who comprise the government respond to incentives just like anyone else and are not magically transformed to selfless agents of the good merely by accepting government employment, from the awareness that for government to provide a benefit to some, it must first take it from others, and from the knowledge that politicians cannot repeal the laws of economics. For the same reason, their predictions are usually negative and utterly inconsistent with the utopian wishful-thinking that lies at the heart of virtually all contemporary political advocacy. And because no one likes to hear that he cannot have his cake and eat it too or be told that his good intentions cannot be translated into reality either by waving a magic wand or by passing legislation, these predictions are greeted not merely with disbelief, but with derision.

It is human nature to want to shoot the messenger bearing unwelcome tidings. And so, for the sin of continually pointing out that the emperor has no clothes, libertarians are attacked as heartless bastards devoid of compassion for the less fortunate, despicable flacks for the rich or for business interests, unthinking dogmatists who place blind faith in the free market, or, at best, members of the lunatic fringe.

Cassandra’s curse was to always tell the truth about the future, but never be believed. If you add to that curse that she would be ridiculed, derided, and shunned for making her predictions, you have a pretty fair approximation of what it feels like to be a libertarian.

If you’d like a taste of what it feels like to be a libertarian, try telling people that the incoming Obama Administration is advocating precisely those aspects of FDR’s New Deal that prolonged the great depression for a decade; that propping up failed and failing ventures with government money in order to save jobs in the present merely shifts resources from relatively more to relatively less productive uses, impedes the corrective process, undermines the economic growth necessary for recovery, and increases unemployment in the long term; and that any "economic" stimulus package will inexorably be made to serve political rather than economic ends, and see what kind of reaction you get. And trust me, it won’t feel any better five or ten years from now when everything you have just said has been proven true and Obama, like FDR, is nonetheless revered as the savior of the country.

Thanks for sharing!

The sad reality is that for the most part we are a pop-culture therefore having the leaders we deserve. The average 30 year old knows more about American Idol than the fiasco that is Washington DC.

Franco
05-29-2009, 09:49 PM
I read this today in the LP news and thought it was worth sharing...

John Hasnas
Associate Professor
McDonough School of Business
Georgetown University

Political analysts frequently consider what it means to be a libertarian. In fact, in 1997, Charles Murray published a short book entitled "What It Means to Be a Libertarian" that does an excellent job of presenting the core principles of libertarian political philosophy. But almost no one ever discusses what it feels like to be a libertarian. How does it actually feel to be someone who holds the principles described in Murray’s book?

I’ll tell you. It feels bad. Being a libertarian means living with an almost unendurable level of frustration. It means being subject to unending scorn and derision despite being inevitably proven correct by events. How does it feel to be a libertarian? Imagine what the internal life of Cassandra must have been and you will have a pretty good idea.

Imagine spending two decades warning that government policy is leading to a major economic collapse, and then, when the collapse comes, watching the world conclude that markets do not work.

Imagine continually explaining that markets function because they have a built in corrective mechanism; that periodic contractions are necessary to weed out unproductive ventures; that continually loosening credit to avoid such corrections just puts off the day of reckoning and inevitably leads to a larger recession; that this is precisely what the government did during the 1920's that led to the great depression; and then, when the recession hits, seeing it offered as proof of the failure of laissez-faire capitalism.

Imagine spending years decrying federal intervention in the home mortgage market; pointing out the dangers associated with legislation such as the Community Reinvestment Act that forces lenders to make more risky loans than they otherwise would; testifying before Congress on the lack of oversight and inevitable insolvency of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to legislators who angrily respond either that one is "exaggerat[ing] a threat of safety and soundness . . . which I do not see" (Barney Frank) or "[I[f it ain’t broke, why do you want to fix it? Have the GSEs [government-sponsored enterprises] ever missed their housing goals" (Maxine Waters) or "[T[he problem that we have and that we are faced with is maybe some individuals who wanted to do away with GSEs in the first place" (Gregory Meeks) or that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are "one of the great success stories of all time" (Christopher Dodd); and arguing that the moral hazard created by the implicit federal backing of such privately-owned government-sponsored enterprises is likely to set off a wave of unjustifiably risky investments, and then, when the housing market implodes under the weight of bad loans, watching the collapse get blamed on the greed and rapaciousness of "Wall Street."

I remember attending a lecture at Georgetown in the mid-1990s given by a member of the libertarian Cato Institute in which he predicted that, unless changed, government policy would trigger an economic crisis by 2006. That prediction was obviously ideologically-motivated alarmism. After all, the crisis did not occur until 2008.

Libertarians spend their lives accurately predicting the future effects of government policy. Their predictions are accurate because they are derived from Hayek’s insights into the limitations of human knowledge, from the recognition that the people who comprise the government respond to incentives just like anyone else and are not magically transformed to selfless agents of the good merely by accepting government employment, from the awareness that for government to provide a benefit to some, it must first take it from others, and from the knowledge that politicians cannot repeal the laws of economics. For the same reason, their predictions are usually negative and utterly inconsistent with the utopian wishful-thinking that lies at the heart of virtually all contemporary political advocacy. And because no one likes to hear that he cannot have his cake and eat it too or be told that his good intentions cannot be translated into reality either by waving a magic wand or by passing legislation, these predictions are greeted not merely with disbelief, but with derision.

It is human nature to want to shoot the messenger bearing unwelcome tidings. And so, for the sin of continually pointing out that the emperor has no clothes, libertarians are attacked as heartless bastards devoid of compassion for the less fortunate, despicable flacks for the rich or for business interests, unthinking dogmatists who place blind faith in the free market, or, at best, members of the lunatic fringe.

Cassandra’s curse was to always tell the truth about the future, but never be believed. If you add to that curse that she would be ridiculed, derided, and shunned for making her predictions, you have a pretty fair approximation of what it feels like to be a libertarian.

If you’d like a taste of what it feels like to be a libertarian, try telling people that the incoming Obama Administration is advocating precisely those aspects of FDR’s New Deal that prolonged the great depression for a decade; that propping up failed and failing ventures with government money in order to save jobs in the present merely shifts resources from relatively more to relatively less productive uses, impedes the corrective process, undermines the economic growth necessary for recovery, and increases unemployment in the long term; and that any "economic" stimulus package will inexorably be made to serve political rather than economic ends, and see what kind of reaction you get. And trust me, it won’t feel any better five or ten years from now when everything you have just said has been proven true and Obama, like FDR, is nonetheless revered as the savior of the country.

Thanks for sharing!

The sad truth is that we are a pop-culture and have the leaders we deserve. The average 30 something year old knows more about American Idol than the fiasco that is Washington DC.

Ken Bora
05-29-2009, 10:12 PM
How would a libertarian rise up in a 2 party system?
Yes we have a 2 party system, have had it from the beginning. Yet we have not always had one of these 2 parties in power. George Washington did not belong to any political party when first elected. He later discovered he was a Federalist. In my last visit to my local polling place I voted for members of the republican, green, democratic, and progressive parties simply by voting for the best person for the job. Often swayed by those who took the time to stand on the front porch and get drooled and shed upon by the Chesapeakes….. That goes a long way with me. So how would a libertarian rise up? By having a solid message and campaigning it.