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View Full Version : Tritronics G2 vs. G3



dnf777
07-10-2009, 12:44 PM
I haven't had to buy a collar since about 2000, so I'm out of the loop on the newer TT lines. I see they have some awesome closeout prices at the TT website, and was wondering what is the major difference between the G2 and G3. Looks like they ditched the removable battery and went back to an internal, user replaceable battery. Is this it? Do the G2s have batteries that fall off in the field easily? If they're good, that's a helluva price they're being offered at.

dave

YardleyLabs
07-10-2009, 01:29 PM
I haven't had to buy a collar since about 2000, so I'm out of the loop on the newer TT lines. I see they have some awesome closeout prices at the TT website, and was wondering what is the major difference between the G2 and G3. Looks like they ditched the removable battery and went back to an internal, user replaceable battery. Is this it? Do the G2s have batteries that fall off in the field easily? If they're good, that's a helluva price they're being offered at.

dave
I have a G2 EXP 500 and love it. I've used the G3 and see no reason to change. However, I've never fried a transmitter putting the battery in backwards (as many others have) and still feel that is a problem that can be solved easily with a small piece of duck tape.

Wyldfire
07-10-2009, 08:59 PM
Here is a review of the differences:

http://www.gundogsupply.com/2009-g3-tritronics-review.html

Wyldfire
07-10-2009, 09:02 PM
I decided tonight the extra savings was worth it. Picked up a G2 Pro 500exp at the local Cabela's Bargain Cave tonight for $249.

dnf777
07-11-2009, 07:46 AM
I decided tonight the extra savings was worth it. Picked up a G2 Pro 500exp at the local Cabela's Bargain Cave tonight for $249.

Thanks for the link, just what I was looking for. I hope you left a few at cabelas, I'm right behind you. Those prices are hard to pass up.

Robert
07-11-2009, 09:29 AM
I have the original sportsman's model and a new G3 sportsman model.

While I like everything about the G3 the momentary and continues buttons have been switched around from the original model. I'm accustomed to the "original" way so the G3 just sits in the training bag. Not sure if that applies to the higher end models.

KYshooter
07-11-2009, 11:40 AM
I went with the G2 upland special EXP. Closeout prices were too good to pass up for me. I did like the antenna better on the G3, but that alone wasn't worth the extra money me.

Pheasanttomeetyou
07-11-2009, 02:47 PM
I haven't had to buy a collar since about 2000, so I'm out of the loop on the newer TT lines. I see they have some awesome closeout prices at the TT website, and was wondering what is the major difference between the G2 and G3. Looks like they ditched the removable battery and went back to an internal, user replaceable battery. Is this it? Do the G2s have batteries that fall off in the field easily? If they're good, that's a helluva price they're being offered at.

dave

You should want the Pro series. I have a Pro 500 G2 and Pro 500 G3. If the $$ is right for the G2, hardly any difference - GO FOR IT!.

The changes to the collar is as follows: G3 transmitter slightly smaller. The antenna is attached to the G3 transmitter. The "good dog" button is incorporated with the front buttons (pad). It is also harder to accidently open up the G3 transmitter to replace the batteries.

The Pro G2 transmitter can be unscrewed fairly easily when replacing the batteries. Tritronics considers this a design flaw. Apparently, several handlers unconsciously wring their hands while watching their dog in the field and accidently unscrew the transmitter. For this reason, they redesigned the G3 unit. So, if your one of those people who wring you're hands and play with the transmitter when you get nervous, think seriously about the G3!

Tritronics also received complaints regarding the size and location of the Pro G2's "good dog" button. Accordingly, this button is now located with the other buttons, in the front of the transmitter.

It is more convenient to have the antenna permanently attached to the transmitter (one less thing to lose) but no big deal if you can get a G2 for lots less.

But, once again, if you do any serious training/field work go with the Pro series collar.

Hope this helps,

dnf777
07-11-2009, 04:18 PM
You should want the Pro series. I have a Pro 500 G2 and Pro 500 G3. If the $$ is right for the G2, hardly any difference - GO FOR IT!.

The changes to the collar is as follows: G3 transmitter slightly smaller. The antenna is attached to the G3 transmitter. The "good dog" button is incorporated with the front buttons (pad). It is also harder to accidently open up the G3 transmitter to replace the batteries.

The Pro G2 transmitter can be unscrewed fairly easily when replacing the batteries. Tritronics considers this a design flaw. Apparently, several handlers unconsciously wring their hands while watching their dog in the field and accidently unscrew the transmitter. For this reason, they redesigned the G3 unit. So, if your one of those people who wring you're hands and play with the transmitter when you get nervous, think seriously about the G3!

Tritronics also received complaints regarding the size and location of the Pro G2's "good dog" button. Accordingly, this button is now located with the other buttons, in the front of the transmitter.

It is more convenient to have the antenna permanently attached to the transmitter (one less thing to lose) but no big deal if you can get a G2 for lots less.

But, once again, if you do any serious training/field work go with the Pro series collar.

Hope this helps,

Thanks for the thoughtful reply. I have used the Flyway for ~15 years. I'm thinking about grabbing a G2 Field-90. It seems to have variable levels of nick and burn, with simplified buttons. I never liked the 3-button arrangement on the flyway, which is what the Pro series have, if I'm right.
What, in your opinion, is the advantage of the pro series over the field 90? (not including multi-dog capabilities)

Wyldfire
07-11-2009, 05:08 PM
which is what the Pro series have, if I'm right

Pro 500 only has two buttons. Low, medium, and both for high. Toggle switch to change between continuous and momentary. So you have 18 levels of each, instead of 6 as the 90.

dnf777
07-11-2009, 05:55 PM
Pro 500 only has two buttons. Low, medium, and both for high. Toggle switch to change between continuous and momentary. So you have 18 levels of each, instead of 6 as the 90.

So unless I'm mistaken, the flyway actually does everything the pro 500 does, but has a separate dedicated cont. button with 6 levels, instead of having to toggle to continuous then having 18 levels?

If that's true, I'm not sure I understand the advantage of the added expense and complexity of the 500. In my limited experience, the quick easy ability to either burn or nick is more important to me than more sub-divisions of intensity. I often hear the pros on tapes refer to levels 1 through 6, but never more fine tuning that that. I wonder if it's really necessary.

Is there really a perceptible difference between the 18 individual steps? I mean, does a low-button 6 feel much different than a two-button 5? On my flyway, I can tell a definite difference between the dial levels, but not much between the button combinations.

Wyldfire
07-11-2009, 06:50 PM
So unless I'm mistaken, the flyway actually does everything the pro 500 does, but has a separate dedicated cont. button with 6 levels, instead of having to toggle to continuous then having 18 levels?



Pretty much correct.

YardleyLabs
07-11-2009, 06:58 PM
So unless I'm mistaken, the flyway actually does everything the pro 500 does, but has a separate dedicated cont. button with 6 levels, instead of having to toggle to continuous then having 18 levels?

If that's true, I'm not sure I understand the advantage of the added expense and complexity of the 500. In my limited experience, the quick easy ability to either burn or nick is more important to me than more sub-divisions of intensity. I often hear the pros on tapes refer to levels 1 through 6, but never more fine tuning that that. I wonder if it's really necessary.

Is there really a perceptible difference between the 18 individual steps? I mean, does a low-button 6 feel much different than a two-button 5? On my flyway, I can tell a definite difference between the dial levels, but not much between the button combinations.

Dave,

The simple answer is yes. My dogs generally "live" on a single number, receiving either low, medium or high at the number during a particular set up. However, Each of my dogs lives with a different number. Two are very sensitive and seldom see anything but 2 or 3. Two others are less sensitive and are more likely to receive stimulation at 3 or 4. The level of stimulation tends to be higher for nicks than for burns, and lower in water (or with a wet dog) than on land. By using the Pro 500, I have quick intuitive access to all of these levels using a button layout that never requires me to look at the transmitter other than to make sure I'm stimulating the right dog. My prior collar was an Innotek with an LED display. By the time I could look at the LED to make a change in setting the moment for correction had passed.

Wyldfire
07-11-2009, 07:45 PM
The simple answer is yes. My dogs generally "live" on a single number, receiving either low, medium or high at the number during a particular set up. However, Each of my dogs lives with a different number. Two are very sensitive and seldom see anything but 2 or 3. Two others are less sensitive and are more likely to receive stimulation at 3 or 4. The level of stimulation tends to be higher for nicks than for burns, and lower in water (or with a wet dog) than on land. By using the Pro 500, I have quick intuitive access to all of these levels using a button layout that never requires me to look at the transmitter other than to make sure I'm stimulating the right dog.

I agree with Jeff. I have 3 dogs a 2, a 3, and a 4. Start a low nick and escalate as needed. All happens with out thinking . My wife has even commented she knows what is coming even when she is on a gunstation. She can tell when my thumb flicks the toggle switch to flip over to continous, and if my right hand moves over to the transmitter she knows the big burn is coming as I have dialed it up. Done it for so long it just happens don't even think about it.

dnf777
07-11-2009, 07:48 PM
Lots of good advice, thanks.

Still not sure I understand the PRICE difference, but then again, I think I do ;-)

Pheasanttomeetyou
07-12-2009, 05:33 PM
Thanks for the thoughtful reply. I have used the Flyway for ~15 years. I'm thinking about grabbing a G2 Field-90. It seems to have variable levels of nick and burn, with simplified buttons. I never liked the 3-button arrangement on the flyway, which is what the Pro series have, if I'm right.
What, in your opinion, is the advantage of the pro series over the field 90? (not including multi-dog capabilities)

I love the 3 button arrangement. It gives you outstanding flexibility, and your dog experiences incremental increases in pressure as you move "up the pad".

I personally don't like other types of collars that offer only 2 changes in stimulation on the transmitter's pad before you need to adjust "the dial." Because, what happens is your dog experiences only 2 incremental changes of stimulation and then a big increase in stimulation after you go to the dial. Also, as you are concentrating on the dog's reaction in the field, it's much easier to go to that third, 2 fingers down, position on the pad than worry about the dial.

If you feel that the toggle arrangement between momentary and continuous stimulation would be too confusing, than consider a Pro 100 or 200 unit. If most of your corrections with be momentary, than the 200 unit is for you. If most of your corrections will be continuous, than the 100 unit would work best.

The difference in price between a Pro 500 and the Pro 100/200 units is $50-60. I do not know the difference between the Pro collars and the G2 Field-90.

This is a sizable investment, but you will have this collar for many years, and can divide the difference in price over a 5-8 year period. I would go with the unit that offers you the most flexibility, ease of use, and incremental changes in pressure (fairest to your dog).

Good luck!