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Uncle Bill
02-06-2010, 01:53 PM
Other than putting that Algore lie to rest, this article is just another reason to believe the Obama agenda is to kill the USA spirit completely.

Every day Obama tries to take more and more from Americans, and put it in the hands of his international toadies.

UB



Newsmax
Obama Surrendering Internet to Foreign Powers
Sun, 31 Jan 2010 06:41 PM
By: Bradley A. Blakeman

Without the ingenuity of America’s brightest minds and the investment of U.S. taxpayer dollars, there would be no Internet, as we now know it today.

Now, the Obama administration has moved quietly to cede control of the Web from the United States to foreign powers.

Some background: The Internet came into being because of the genius work of Americans Dr.Robert E. Kahn and Dr. Vinton G. Cerf. These men, while working for the Department of Defense in the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency in the early 1970s, conceived, designed, and implemented the idea of "open-architecture networking."

This breakthrough in connectivity and networking was the birth of the Internet.

These two gentlemen had the vision and the brainpower to create a worldwide computer Internet communications network that forever changed the world and how we communicate in it.

They discovered that providing a person with a unique identifier (TCP/IP) that was able to be recognized and interact through a network of servers would allow users to communicate with others.

The servers would use a series of giant receivers to recognize the identifier and connect networks to networks, passing on information from computer to computer in a seamless real-time exchange of information. This new process of communication became known as the "information super highway," aka, the Internet.

Now for the bad news: In an effort to show the world how inclusive, sharing, cooperative, and international America can be, the Obama administration set off on a plan to surrender control and key management of the Internet by the U.S. Department of Commerce and its agents.

The key to the control America has over the Internet is through the management of the Domain Name System (DNS) and the giant servers that service the Internet.
Domain names are managed through an entity named IANA, the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority. The IANA, which operates on behalf of the U.S. Department of Commerce, is responsible for the global coordination of the DNS, IP addressing, and other Internet protocol resources.

In short, without an IP Address or other essential Internet protocols, a person or entity would not have access to the Internet.

For years, the international community has been pressuring the United States to surrender its control and management of the Internet. They want an international body such as the United Nations or even the International Telecommunications Union, (an entity that coordinates international telephone communications), to manage all aspects of the Internet in behalf of all nations.

The argument advanced for those seeking international control of the Internet is that the Internet has become such a powerful, pervasive, and a dependent form of international communications, that it would be dangerous and inequitable for any one nation to control and manage it.

Just this past spring, within months of Obama's taking office, his administration, through the Department of Commerce, agreed to relinquish some control over IANA and their governance. The Obama administration has agreed to give greater representation to foreign companies and countries on IANA.
This amounts to one small step for internationalism and one giant leap for surrendering America's control over an invention we have every right and responsibility to control and manage.

It is in America's economic and national security interests not to relinquish any control. We are responsible for the control, operation, and functionality of one of the modern world's greatest inventions and most powerful communications network.

What better country to protect the Internet than the United States?

We invented it, and we paid for the research and implementation that made it
possible. We are the freest, most tolerant nation on earth, we believe in the
fundamental right of free speech, and we practice a free market of commerce and ideas.

America has always been against censorship and has shared its invention with the world without fee or unreasonable or arbitrary restriction. The user fee to operate on the Internet is not one paid to the U.S. government; a consumer pays it to private Internet companies, who provide access to the Internet through servers for their subscribers.

Look no further than China's recent move against Google to censor the
Internet, and you can envision what can happen when other nations less free
than the United States seek to control the Internet beyond even their own borders.

America needs to wake up. If we lose control over the management of the
Internet, we have given away one of our nation's greatest assets with nothing
in return to show for it.

The Obama administration's actions will set in motion a slow and complete takeover of the Internet by the United Nations or some other equally U.S.-hostile and unfriendly international body. And once it is gone, it will be gone forever.
The surrender of the Internet will spell disaster for our nation, financially, as well as for safety, security and our standing as a great power that values freedom and the free exchange of ideas and information.

As far as I am concerned, America is still the last best hope for a more peaceful and prosperous world and our president should not be looking for ways to weaken us. Rather, his job is to work to strengthen us and protect our nation's greatest asset our people's creativity and ingenuity.

YardleyLabs
02-06-2010, 02:53 PM
While Mr. Blakeman was scheduling appointments for President Bush, he should have paid more attention to what was being discussed during the meetings. He is correct that there has been a move to privatize and internationalize the management of the Internet Domain Naminf System. This process began to take its current form under Clinton, and the process accelerated under President G. W. Bush. Under Bush, overall authority for the management of IANA was turned over to the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), which operated as a non-profit corporation under a mandate to establish bottom up, international mechanisms for policy direction. In 2006, the process of moving responsibility for the management of root servers was moved to ICANN as part of the third major update in the memorandum of understanding between the ICANN and the Department of Commerce. The most recent update discussed by Blakeman simply continues the process that was started with the initial publication of this privatization plan in 1998. If Blakemann were seriously concerned, why wasn't he doing something when the 2002 memorandum of understanding was being developed in the Bush White House where Blakeman was a senior staff and researcher?

dnf777
02-06-2010, 03:10 PM
While Mr. Blakeman was scheduling appointments for President Bush, he should have paid more attention to what was being discussed during the meetings. He is correct that there has been a move to privatize and internationalize the management of the Internet Domain Naminf System. This process began to take its current form under Clinton, and the process accelerated under President G. W. Bush. Under Bush, overall authority for the management of IANA was turned over to the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), which operated as a non-profit corporation under a mandate to establish bottom up, international mechanisms for policy direction. In 2006, the process of moving responsibility for the management of root servers was moved to ICANN as part of the third major update in the memorandum of understanding between the ICANN and the Department of Commerce. The most recent update discussed by Blakeman simply continues the process that was started with the initial publication of this privatization plan in 1998. If Blakemann were seriously concerned, why wasn't he doing something when the 2002 memorandum of understanding was being developed in the Bush White House where Blakeman was a senior staff and researcher?

I have no idea what you're talking about, but just to be safe, I think that much anti-American, anti-Christian, pro-Kenyan Socialist Agenda talk deserves a few personal attacks! I bet your mom wore combat boots!

There, that'll discredit you and prove I'm right about everything! :cool:

M&K's Retrievers
02-09-2010, 03:21 PM
You mean AL Gore didn't invent the Internet? The next thing your gonna tell me is it's not getting warmer outside.:rolleyes:

Sabireley
02-09-2010, 03:33 PM
You mean AL Gore didn't invent the Internet? The next thing your gonna tell me is it's not getting warmer outside.:rolleyes:

A funny story...

I was in a meeting at Wordcom with Vint Cerf, one of the founders of the DARPANET that became the internet. One of the sales guys I was with made a crack about Al Gore inventing the internet during the meeting. Vint Cerf stopped the meeting and took all of us down to his office. On the wall were lots of pictures with all sorts of famous people, including pictures of him with Al Gore. He said that Al Gore deserves a lot of the credit for bringing the internet out of the basement of universities and into the hands of the public through his sponsorship and votes in congress. I generally despise Al Gore, but if Vint Cerf is going to give him credit, I figure I should share the story.

Steve

road kill
02-09-2010, 03:43 PM
A funny story...

I was in a meeting at Wordcom with Vint Cerf, one of the founders of the DARPANET that became the internet. One of the sales guys I was with made a crack about Al Gore inventing the internet during the meeting. Vint Cerf stopped the meeting and took all of us down to his office. On the wall were lots of pictures with all sorts of famous people, including pictures of him with Al Gore. He said that Al Gore deserves a lot of the credit for bringing the internet out of the basement of universities and into the hands of the public through his sponsorship and votes in congress. I generally despise Al Gore, but if Vint Cerf is going to give him credit, I figure I should share the story.

Steve

If Al Gore had stated that he was a proponent and a key figure in making the internet a useable, accessable public tool I don't think anyone would take issue.

But I believe he laid claim to "creating" the internet, thereby looking somewhat foolish.

"During my service in the United States Congress, I took the initiative in creating the Internet. "

I believe it was from an interview with Wolf.....

http://www.cnn.com/ALLPOLITICS/stories/1999/03/09/president.2000/transcript.gore/index.html






rk

M&K's Retrievers
02-09-2010, 03:53 PM
But the ice is melting in my coctail. What am I to do? :rolleyes:

YardleyLabs
02-09-2010, 05:22 PM
The versions of Internet protocols used for networking had been developed, but the infrastructure supporting Internet trafficking was virtually non-existent in the 1980's. Packet routing standards had been defined and proven conceptually, but there were few useful applications. The user interface was virtually unusable and commercial entities were excluded from participation. That landscape was transformed with the adoption of the Hig Performance Computing and Communication Act of 1991, better known as the "Gore Bill" in recognition of its author and primary sponsor. Wikipedia notes:

"The High Performance Computing and Communication Act of 1991 (HPCA) is an Act of Congress (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Act_of_Congress) promulgated (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Promulgation) in the 102nd United States Congress (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/102nd_United_States_Congress) as Pub.L. 102-194 (http://assembler.law.cornell.edu/usc-cgi/get_external.cgi?type=pubL&target=102-194) on 1991-12-09. Often referred to as the Gore Bill[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Performance_Computing_and_Communication_Act_o f_1991#cite_note-CHM-0), it was created and introduced by then Senator (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Senate) Albert Gore, Jr. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_Gore), and led to the development of the National Information Infrastructure (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Information_Infrastructure) and the funding of the National Research and Education Network (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Research_and_Education_Network) (NREN).[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Performance_Computing_and_Communication_Act_o f_1991#cite_note-CHM-0)[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Performance_Computing_and_Communication_Act_o f_1991#cite_note-USDA-1)[3] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Performance_Computing_and_Communication_Act_o f_1991#cite_note-2) The act built on prior U.S. efforts of developing a national networking infrastructure, starting with the ARPANET (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ARPANET) in the 1960s, and the funding of the National Science Foundation Network (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Science_Foundation_Network) (NSFnet) in the 1980s. The renewed effort became known in popular language as building the Information Superhighway (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Information_Superhighway).[2] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Performance_Computing_and_Communication_Act_o f_1991#cite_note-USDA-1)[4] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Performance_Computing_and_Communication_Act_o f_1991#cite_note-3)) It also included the High-Performance Computing and Communications Initiative and spurred many significant technological developments, such as the Mosaic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mosaic_%28web_browser%29) web browser (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_browser),[5] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Performance_Computing_and_Communication_Act_o f_1991#cite_note-Mosaic-4) and the creation of a high-speed (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadband_Internet_access) fiber optic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Optical_fiber) computer network (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_network)."


Related to this, it also opened the doors for commercial development and use of the Internet. As one directly involved in system development at the time, the impact was pretty dramatic. In 1991, the Internet was an academic curiosity. By 1995, it was clear that the Internet would provide the primary platform for systems development over the next few decades.


In his 1999 interview with Wolf Blitzer, Gore was listing legislative, not scientific, achievements. He said "During my service in the United States Congress, I took the initiative in creating the Internet. I took the initiative in moving forward a whole range of initiatives that have proven to be important to our country's economic growth and environmental protection, improvements in our educational system."



In context, Gore's statement was a fair description of his role in one of the most important legislative initiatives affecting the development of the Internet as we know it. The fact thst he was then misquoted, out of context, as saying that he created the Internet, was related more to deliberate misrepresentations linked to the Presidential campaign than to anything said by Gore himself.

M&K's Retrievers
02-09-2010, 06:09 PM
Quoting Yardley in part:

"In his 1999 interview with Wolf Blitzer, Gore was listing legislative, not scientific, achievements. He said "During my service in the United States Congress, I took the initiative in creating the Internet. I took the initiative in moving forward a whole range of initiatives that have proven to be important to our country's economic growth and environmental protection, improvements in our educational system."
.[/QUOTE]

I've have to agree with RK. If his intent was not to mislead or be misunderstood in the future, he could have said he introduced or sponsered legislation that blah, blah, blah. Instead, he had to imply that he created the internet. Typical politician BS I guess.

huntinman
02-09-2010, 06:52 PM
Quoting Yardley in part:

"In his 1999 interview with Wolf Blitzer, Gore was listing legislative, not scientific, achievements. He said "During my service in the United States Congress, I took the initiative in creating the Internet. I took the initiative in moving forward a whole range of initiatives that have proven to be important to our country's economic growth and environmental protection, improvements in our educational system."
.

I've have to agree with RK. If his intent was not to mislead or be misunderstood in the future, he could have said he introduced or sponsered legislation that blah, blah, blah. Instead, he had to imply that he created the internet. Typical politician BS I guess.[/QUOTE]

yeah and don't forget...he has a lockbox to put it in...

Gerry Clinchy
02-10-2010, 11:42 AM
Wasn't the question: is it appropriate for the U.S. to relinquish the "control" of the Internet to some international body?

As was stated ... since the U.S. developed the technology, financed its common usage, and has thus far been very willing to share that technology universally, how much better could it be managed by an international body? We can readily see the political use to which the Olympics and the UN has been put. Would such political manipulation be an advantage for the free use of the Internet?

YardleyLabs
02-10-2010, 12:23 PM
Wasn't the question: is it appropriate for the U.S. to relinquish the "control" of the Internet to some international body?

As was stated ... since the U.S. developed the technology, financed its common usage, and has thus far been very willing to share that technology universally, how much better could it be managed by an international body? We can readily see the political use to which the Olympics and the UN has been put. Would such political manipulation be an advantage for the free use of the Internet?
Gerry,

The process of giving up control of the Internet started in the late 1990's and was pretty much set in stone during the last administration. A number of factors went into the decision: a desire to transfer financial responsibility from the government to the private sector, a desire to engage a broader range of stakeholders in the process, and concerns that failure to give countries a greater say in the management of their own domains would result in creation of competing structures that would undermine world wide interoperability.

The first major step in this process actually began with the Gore Bill in 1991, which resulted in a privatization of the management of the network hubs that provide the foundation for the Internet. The next major step, based on legislation in 1998, was the creation of a private, non-profit corporation (ICANN) to assume responsibility for the management of domain names. Legislation to do this was passed under Clinton and responsibilities were moved to the new organization under Bush.

Even before this process was complete, the previous government funded and managed corporation -- Network Solutions -- saw and end to its government subsidies and its contract with the Department of Commerce that had previously given it total control of all domain naming. The final step in the process is the transfer of responsibilities for management and funding of "root" servers to the new organization. That process began in 2002 with the adoption of a new memorandum of understanding between ICANN and the Department of Commerce. Within a few years, the bulk of all root servers were being managed by private organizations throughout the world. The event noted in the OP's original article was simply another modification in the memorandum of understanding between ICANN and Commerce concerning ICANN's management of responsibility for managing the assignment of blocks of IP addresses and the creation of top level domains (e.g., .COM, .NET, .US, etc.). It did not set any new directions. It only continued what has been going on for more than eight years.

Even since the Internet was first opened to commerce following the adoption of the Gore Bill, there have been many people concerned about the privatization of what had previously been a completely US government controlled activity. Even under ARPANET, the military was concerned about security problems and split its own networks off from ARPANET, creating what is now known as NIPRnet. However, there is no question but that the privatization of the management of the Internet is what made it possible for the Internet to become the force that it has.

Buzz
02-10-2010, 08:41 PM
If Al Gore had stated that he was a proponent and a key figure in making the internet a useable, accessable public tool I don't think anyone would take issue.

But I believe he laid claim to "creating" the internet, thereby looking somewhat foolish.

"During my service in the United States Congress, I took the initiative in creating the Internet. "

I believe it was from an interview with Wolf.....

http://www.cnn.com/ALLPOLITICS/stories/1999/03/09/president.2000/transcript.gore/index.html


rk


Good God man, did you even go read the text of the interview with Blitzer? Here is the question that got Gore into trouble. He made the mistake of stating it in such a way that unethical people could selectively quote him and make it look like he was taking full credit for inventing the internet.



BLITZER: I want to get to some of the substance of domestic and international issues in a minute, but let's just wrap up a little bit of the politics right now.

Why should Democrats, looking at the Democratic nomination process, support you instead of Bill Bradley, a friend of yours, a former colleague in the Senate? What do you have to bring to this that he doesn't necessarily bring to this process?

GORE: Well, I will be offering -- I'll be offering my vision when my campaign begins. And it will be comprehensive and sweeping. And I hope that it will be compelling enough to draw people toward it. I feel that it will be.

But it will emerge from my dialogue with the American people. I've traveled to every part of this country during the last six years. During my service in the United States Congress, I took the initiative in creating the Internet. I took the initiative in moving forward a whole range of initiatives that have proven to be important to our country's economic growth and environmental protection, improvements in our educational system.

During a quarter century of public service, including most of it long before I came into my current job, I have worked to try to improve the quality of life in our country and in our world. And what I've seen during that experience is an emerging future that's very exciting, about which I'm very optimistic, and toward which I want to lead.

Here is a quote from an article, "The Team that Put the Net in Orbit."


Mr. Gore had been instrumental in introducing legislation, beginning in 1988, to finance what he originally called a “national data highway.”

“Our corporations are not taking advantage of high-performance computing to enhance their productivity,” Mr. Gore, then a senator, said in an interview at the time. “With greater access to supercomputers, virtually every business in America could achieve tremendous gains.”

Ultimately, in 1991, his bill to create a National Research and Education Network did pass. Funded by the National Science Foundation, it was instrumental in upgrading the speed of the academic and scientific network backbone leading up to the commercialized Internet.

“He is a hero in this field,” said Lawrence H. Landweber, a computer scientist at the University of Wisconsin who in 1980 made the pioneering decision to use the basic TCP/IP Internet protocol for CSNET, an academic network that preceded NSFnet and laid the foundation for “internetworking.”

Since you disagree so much with his ideology, I guess it's impossible to forgive him for phrasing his answer badly or to give him any credit for doing a great thing for the country. But then I guess you'd have to admit that the gooberment does something right once in awhile too.