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Uncle Bill
04-09-2010, 02:30 PM
...be enacted before the electorate replaces the socialists in congress? Or is it all inevitable regardless of who is doing the voting?

Newt had a great speech last night...almost made me think those that think like him, if we could find enough of them, could actually put Humpty Dumpty together again. I have my doubts.

Whether these changes are good or bad depends in part on how we adapt to them. But, ready or not, here they come!


1. The Post Office. Get ready to imagine a world without the post office. They are so deeply in financial trouble that there is probably no way to sustain it long term.
Email, Fed Ex, and UPS have just about wiped out the minimum revenue needed to keep the post office alive. Most of your mail every day is junk mail and bills.

2. The Check. Britain is already laying the groundwork to do away with checks by 2018. It costs the financial system billions of dollars a year to process checks. Plastic cards and online transactions will lead to the eventual demise of the check. This plays right into the death of the post office If you never paid your bills by mail and never received them by mail, the post office would absolutely go out of business.

3. The Newspaper. The younger generation simply doesn't read the newspaper. They certainly don't subscribe to a daily delivered print edition. That may go the way of the milkman and the laundry man. As for reading the paper online, get ready to pay for it. The rise in mobile Internet devices and e-readers has caused all the newspaper and magazine publishers to form an alliance. They have met with Apple, Amazon, and the major cell phone companies to develop a model for paid subscription services.

4. The Book. You say you will never give up the physical book that you hold in your hand and turn the literal pages. I said the same thing about downloading music from iTunes. I wanted my hard copy CD. But I quickly changed my mind when I discovered that I could get albums for half the price without ever leaving home to get the latest music. The same thing will happen with books. You can browse a bookstore online and even read a preview chapter before you buy. And the price is less than half that of a real book. And think of the convenience! Once you start flicking your fingers on the screen instead of the book, you find that you are lost in the story, can't wait to see what happens next, and you forget that you're holding a gadget instead of a book.

5. The Land Line Telephone. Unless you have a large family and make a lot of local calls, you don't need it anymore. Most people keep it simply because they're always had it. But you are paying double charges for that extra service. All the cell phone companies will let you call customers using the same cell provider for no charge against your minutes.

6. Music. This is one of the saddest parts of the change story. The music industry is dying a slow death. Not just because of illegal downloading. It's the lack of innovative new music being given a chance to get to the people who would like to hear it. Greed and corruption is the problem. The record labels and the radio conglomerates simply self-destruction. Over 40% of the music purchased today is "catalog items," meaning traditional music that the public is familiar with. Older established artists. This is also true on the live concert circuit. To explore this fascinating and disturbing topic further, check out the book,
"Appetite for Self-Destruction" by Steve Knopper, and the video documentary, "Before the Music Dies."

7. Television. Revenues to the networks are down dramatically. Not just because of the economy. People are watching TV and movies streamed from their computers. And they're playing games and doing all lots of other things that take up the time that used to be spent watching TV. Prime time shows have degenerated down to lower than the lowest common denominator. Cable rates are skyrocketing and commercials run about every 4 minutes and 30 seconds.
I say good riddance to most of it It's time for the cable companies to be put out of our misery. Let the people choose what they want to watch online and
through Netflix.

7. The "Things" That You Own. Many of the very possessions that we used to own are still in our lives, but we may not actually own them in the future. They may simply reside in "the cloud." Today your computer has a hard drive and you store your pictures, music, movies, and documents. Your software is on a CD or DVD, and you can always re-install it if need be. But all of that is changing. Apple, Microsoft, and Google are all finishing up their latest "cloud services." That means that when you turn on a computer, the Internet will be built into the operating system. So, Windows, Google, and the Mac OS will be tied straight into the Internet. If you click an icon, it will open something in the Internet cloud. If you save something, it will be saved to the cloud. And you may pay a monthly subscription fee to the cloud provider.

In this virtual world, you can access your music or your books, or your whatever from any laptop or handheld device. That's the good news. But, will you actually own any of this "stuff" or will it all be able to disappear at any moment in a big "Poof?" Will most of the things in our lives be disposable and whimsical? It makes you want to run to the closet and pull out that photo album, grab a book from the shelf, or open up a CD case and pull out the insert.

8. Privacy. If there ever was a concept that we can look back on nostalgically, it would be privacy. That's gone. It's been gone for a long time anyway. There are cameras on the street, in most of the buildings, and even built into your computer and cell phone. But you can be sure that 24/7 "They" know who you are and where you are, right down to the GPS coordinates, and the Google Street View. If you buy something, your habit is put
into a zillion profiles, and your ads will change to reflect those habits. And "They" will try to get you to buy something else. Again and again.






All we will have that can't be changed are Memories.


UB

BonMallari
04-09-2010, 02:42 PM
those are all pretty sure things except for the TV...they need the television to control the masses...when the looters broke into the stores what is the first item you always see in their hands....flat screen TV's...now TV as we know it may change, the first test will be if they can change the content on radio, if they can do that, then TV is next

Terry Britton
04-09-2010, 04:16 PM
1. The Post Office. - I hardly use it, but to receive bills that I pay online anyway.

2. The Check. - I rarely write an actual check these days. Even if I send someone a check such as the last time I ordered syrup from Ken, my bank, Ing Direct sent the check for me saving me stamps. Ing also sends all of my payments for bills out via electronic or by physical checks.

3. The Newspaper. - We quit getting this mostly because they were always pro OU Sooners and Negative on the OSU Cowboys even when the Cowboys were doing better. Why pay the competition when you can get the information you want for free online.

4. The Book. - I still get a physical book for my classes, but also will try to find it on Audible.com or get a Kindle version that has text-to-speech enabled. It is nice to listen to text-books while driving or at work so I am not spending time reading at night during family time. The same is true with my online classes that I download to my Zune.

5. The Land Line Telephone. - We need to get rid of this.

6. Music. - Yeah. But it is cool that I can carry 3000 plus songs with me that I download on my Zune subscription along with 50 podcasts on all kinds of topics. I also carry a few weeks worth of lectures from MBA classes on the Zune too.

7. Television. - Since kids and dogs take up so much time, and basically limiting TV to the Disney channel for safe shows, I haven't watched much TV since 2006 when I started Grad school.

7. The "Things" That You Own. We need to get rid of a lot of things, and simplify with a few devices.


8. Privacy. - I am not sure we have it anymore with that Spider thing that the NSA owns, to tracking on electronic devices such as our phones and Kindles. Even our vehicles from Government Motors has the OnStar tracking, and they can even listen in to what you are talking about.

Terry Britton
04-09-2010, 04:20 PM
Here is a good book on the coming changes for the 21st century.

http://www.amazon.com/Nine-Shift-William-Draves/dp/1577220307/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1270846997&sr=8-1

Not all changes will be bad, such as the virtual office. I can now work from home, and am actually more productive at home than at work. There are people who work for HP that work from Australia or South America a month at a time just to experience other parts of the world. This kind of change may mean that I can go north some time for some duck or pheasant hunting without taking so much time off of work.


Here is another good book to read:
http://www.amazon.com/4-Hour-Workweek-Expanded-Updated-Cutting-Edge/dp/0307465357/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1270847900&sr=1-1

Franco
04-09-2010, 04:47 PM
6. Music. This is one of the saddest parts of the change story. The music industry is dying a slow death. Not just because of illegal downloading. It's the lack of innovative new music being given a chance to get to the people who would like to hear it. Greed and corruption is the problem. The record labels and the radio conglomerates simply self-destruction. Over 40% of the music purchased today is "catalog items," meaning traditional music that the public is familiar with. Older established artists. This is also true on the live concert circuit. To explore this fascinating and disturbing topic further, check out the book,
"Appetite for Self-Destruction" by Steve Knopper, and the video documentary, "Before the Music Dies."

7. Television. Revenues to the networks are down dramatically. Not just because of the economy. People are watching TV and movies streamed from their computers. And they're playing games and doing all lots of other things that take up the time that used to be spent watching TV. Prime time shows have degenerated down to lower than the lowest common denominator. Cable rates are skyrocketing and commercials run about every 4 minutes and 30 seconds.
I say good riddance to most of it It's time for the cable companies to be put out of our misery. Let the people choose what they want to watch online and
through Netflix.



I agree that the days of TV's 28 commercial units per hour may soon be over. How many Ginzu Knife, GIECO and Sham-wow commercials can one sit through!?! Other than some movies on HBO, The NFL Channel, History International, Discovery, Military Channel and NCAA and NFL Football, I really don't watch that much TV.

Yes, the corporate broadcast giants have done a lot of harm to broadcast radio. All of thier Corporate Programming Consultants should be taken behind the shed and shot. However, the reason Satellite is failing is the lack of local content. Pandora, an on-line music station with unlimited choices is out-pacing broadcast streaming and will replace satellite radio. Yet, with the near collapse of local newspapers, advertisers still like radio. Now, with many of the big radio companies going kaput(bankrupt), radio is beginning to fall back into the hands of broadcasters and not accountants. Where pioneering of new music and formats was not in the realm of accountant broadcasters, formats targeting 21-39 year old are thriving under indie owners.