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Buzz
06-02-2010, 02:57 PM
I keep hearing that we have to stop buying oil from those who hate us.

Does the oil pumped out of the gulf and Alaska get sold in America?

Franco
06-02-2010, 09:33 PM
There are numerous major refineries within 200 miles of the well leaking sweet crude. They are located from north of New Orleans all the way past Baton Rouge on the river.

The huge sea going tankers from the middle east pump out thier crude into pipelines at Port Fourchon (foo-chon) for refineries.

So, I can't imagine any production in the gulf not going to La. or Tx. refineries.

I'll have to reaserch but, I've heard that China has purchased some deep water leases from the Cubans.

david gibson
06-03-2010, 06:10 AM
There are numerous major refineries within 200 miles of the well leaking sweet crude. They are located from north of New Orleans all the way past Baton Rouge on the river.

The huge sea going tankers from the middle east pump out thier crude into pipelines at Port Fourchon (foo-chon) for refineries.

So, I can't imagine any production in the gulf not going to La. or Tx. refineries.

I'll have to reaserch but, I've heard that China has purchased some deep water leases from the Cubans.


correctamundo. i am a former merchant marine on exxon tankers and my dad retired as a 2nd officer on same. neither of us can remember anything other than refined product going overseas, or any reason for that, though at times i do recall taking crude up to the east coast to refineries in jersey.

WRL
06-03-2010, 08:04 AM
I keep hearing that we have to stop buying oil from those who hate us.

Does the oil pumped out of the gulf and Alaska get sold in America?

Most Alaskan crude is shipped overseas.

WRL

david gibson
06-03-2010, 09:30 AM
Most Alaskan crude is shipped overseas.

WRL

are you sure? googling around i found these comments:

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>.
Shipping Destinations

Under provisions of the Trans Alaska Pipeline Authorization Act, North Slope crude may not be
exported from the United States, its territories or possessions; exceptions (of which there have been none to the date of this printing), such as crude trades with other countries which might work to the ultimate benefit of the U.S., must be approved by the President, with the concurrence of the
Congress.
When the Trans Alaska Pipeline was constructed it was illegal to ship any of the oil from Alaska to other countries. Then durring the Clinton Administration when oil was $8 a barrel, that law was changed. For 2 years Alyeska Pipeline Terminal shipped to Japan and South Korea a total of 5 times. They decided that this was not cost effective and now they no longer ship there. This was years ago. Now all the oil goes to refineries in Washington State, California and Hawaii. It provides most of the fuel in the Northwestern States. None of it leaves the country. I have this information because I live in Valdez, Alaska. Where the end of the Trans Alaska Pipeline is located and the oil is shipped from. I recieve my information from locals including family members who work at the Alyeska Pipeline Terminal (some of who are managers).

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
this is dated 2005:


As a reaction to oil price and supply concerns, questions about the export of crude
oil produced on Alaska’s North Slope are often directed at Members of Congress. The
export of this oil had been prohibited by the 1973 law allowing the construction of the
pipeline system now transporting oil to the ice-free, southern Alaska port of Valdez. But
following a period of depressed oil prices, legislation was enacted in 1995 permitting
export. Relatively small amounts — never more than 7% — of Alaskan crude were sold
to Korea, Japan, China, and some other countries. These exports stopped by 2000.
Currently, no crude is exported from the West Coast.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

The United States does export about one million barrels per day of oil and oil
products; almost none of this is crude oil. The amount of exports is significant enough
to cause concern among those fearful that the country is exporting oil in a time of high
prices when that oil is needed at home. But 14% of this petroleum is traded with Canada,
23% with Mexico, and 13% is petroleum coke.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>.

YardleyLabs
06-03-2010, 10:22 AM
are you sure? googling around i found these comments:

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>.
Shipping Destinations

Under provisions of the Trans Alaska Pipeline Authorization Act, North Slope crude may not be
exported from the United States, its territories or possessions; exceptions (of which there have been none to the date of this printing), such as crude trades with other countries which might work to the ultimate benefit of the U.S., must be approved by the President, with the concurrence of the
Congress.
When the Trans Alaska Pipeline was constructed it was illegal to ship any of the oil from Alaska to other countries. Then durring the Clinton Administration when oil was $8 a barrel, that law was changed. For 2 years Alyeska Pipeline Terminal shipped to Japan and South Korea a total of 5 times. They decided that this was not cost effective and now they no longer ship there. This was years ago. Now all the oil goes to refineries in Washington State, California and Hawaii. It provides most of the fuel in the Northwestern States. None of it leaves the country. I have this information because I live in Valdez, Alaska. Where the end of the Trans Alaska Pipeline is located and the oil is shipped from. I recieve my information from locals including family members who work at the Alyeska Pipeline Terminal (some of who are managers).

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
this is dated 2005:


As a reaction to oil price and supply concerns, questions about the export of crude
oil produced on Alaska’s North Slope are often directed at Members of Congress. The
export of this oil had been prohibited by the 1973 law allowing the construction of the
pipeline system now transporting oil to the ice-free, southern Alaska port of Valdez. But
following a period of depressed oil prices, legislation was enacted in 1995 permitting
export. Relatively small amounts — never more than 7% — of Alaskan crude were sold
to Korea, Japan, China, and some other countries. These exports stopped by 2000.
Currently, no crude is exported from the West Coast.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

The United States does export about one million barrels per day of oil and oil
products; almost none of this is crude oil. The amount of exports is significant enough
to cause concern among those fearful that the country is exporting oil in a time of high
prices when that oil is needed at home. But 14% of this petroleum is traded with Canada,
23% with Mexico, and 13% is petroleum coke.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>.
Actually, according to current export statistics, a very small amount of Alaskan crude is exported to areas of Canada near the pipeline. However, these exports are dwarfed by the amount of Canadian crude that the US imports from Canada.

WRL
06-04-2010, 05:43 PM
are you sure? googling around i found these comments:

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>.
Shipping Destinations

Under provisions of the Trans Alaska Pipeline Authorization Act, North Slope crude may not be
exported from the United States, its territories or possessions; exceptions (of which there have been none to the date of this printing), such as crude trades with other countries which might work to the ultimate benefit of the U.S., must be approved by the President, with the concurrence of the
Congress.
When the Trans Alaska Pipeline was constructed it was illegal to ship any of the oil from Alaska to other countries. Then durring the Clinton Administration when oil was $8 a barrel, that law was changed. For 2 years Alyeska Pipeline Terminal shipped to Japan and South Korea a total of 5 times. They decided that this was not cost effective and now they no longer ship there. This was years ago. Now all the oil goes to refineries in Washington State, California and Hawaii. It provides most of the fuel in the Northwestern States. None of it leaves the country. I have this information because I live in Valdez, Alaska. Where the end of the Trans Alaska Pipeline is located and the oil is shipped from. I recieve my information from locals including family members who work at the Alyeska Pipeline Terminal (some of who are managers).

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
this is dated 2005:


As a reaction to oil price and supply concerns, questions about the export of crude
oil produced on Alaska’s North Slope are often directed at Members of Congress. The
export of this oil had been prohibited by the 1973 law allowing the construction of the
pipeline system now transporting oil to the ice-free, southern Alaska port of Valdez. But
following a period of depressed oil prices, legislation was enacted in 1995 permitting
export. Relatively small amounts — never more than 7% — of Alaskan crude were sold
to Korea, Japan, China, and some other countries. These exports stopped by 2000.
Currently, no crude is exported from the West Coast.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

The United States does export about one million barrels per day of oil and oil
products; almost none of this is crude oil. The amount of exports is significant enough
to cause concern among those fearful that the country is exporting oil in a time of high
prices when that oil is needed at home. But 14% of this petroleum is traded with Canada,
23% with Mexico, and 13% is petroleum coke.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>.

Sure its possible they have changed their procedures but when I worked up there, a lot of it was exported.

But that was a few years ago.

WRL