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luvmylabs23139
07-20-2010, 09:02 AM
OK, we can agree or disagree about smoking but why just smokers?
How can I think that an RN that is obese is a good example and leading a healthy lifesyle.
Who is in better shape, the smoker that swims at least 5 miles a week or the person that weighs well whatever based on their height. A 300lb nurse telling me to quit smoking would be laughed at by me. If the floor shakes when you are walking on it you are walking disaster!

badbullgator
07-20-2010, 09:29 AM
OK, we can agree or disagree about smoking but why just smokers?
How can I think that an RN that is obese is a good example and leading a healthy lifesyle.
Who is in better shape, the smoker that swims at least 5 miles a week or the person that weighs well whatever based on their height. A 300lb nurse telling me to quit smoking would be laughed at by me. If the floor shakes when you are walking on it you are walking disaster!


Yes but her being fat only affects you if she falls on you. I think the smoking thing has much to do with smoking on the hospital campus, you know second hand smoke and all. I see your point though and I am against any restrictions of this kind, but at the same time I don't like people smoking around me so I have no problem with smoking not being allowed on private property. Remember this has a lot of aspects to it, not limited to but including health insurance rates that the hospital gets for its workers. If nobody on their policy smokes I am sure they get a better rate. They also look good in the public eyes because smokers are few theses days and the enemy of the non-smoker. Fat peole are everywhere. Slipery slope and all

luvmylabs23139
07-20-2010, 09:39 AM
They are not saying you can't smoke here but rather are saying you can't have a job here of you smoke, huge difference.
If I'm a patient I wouldn't know if my nurse or doctor smoked but I damn well would know if they were obese.

Blackstone
07-20-2010, 10:09 AM
OK, we can agree or disagree about smoking but why just smokers?
How can I think that an RN that is obese is a good example and leading a healthy lifesyle.
Who is in better shape, the smoker that swims at least 5 miles a week or the person that weighs well whatever based on their height. A 300lb nurse telling me to quit smoking would be laughed at by me. If the floor shakes when you are walking on it you are walking disaster!

Neither one is a very healthy lifestyle to be sure. Even swimming 5 miles per day isn't going to keep you from getting lung cancer or emphysema from smoking, so I don’t really think one is better for you than the other.

However, I read a study that said companies can save about $10,000 per year per employee if that employee doesn’t smoke. This was based on healthcare and disability costs, and loss of work time due to smoke breaks.

Blackstone
07-20-2010, 10:18 AM
They are not saying you can't smoke here but rather are saying you can't have a job here of you smoke, huge difference.
If I'm a patient I wouldn't know if my nurse or doctor smoked but I damn well would know if they were obese.

Smokers often think other people can't tell they smoke becuase they don't smell it. Most times a non-smoker can tell someone smokes because they can smell it in their hair, clothes & skin. And, if you get in a smoker's car, you can usually smell the smoke that gets in the upholstery and see the film on the windows.

I dated a woman that smoked once. She never smoked around me, but I could still tell she smoked.

badbullgator
07-20-2010, 10:23 AM
They are not saying you can't smoke here but rather are saying you can't have a job here of you smoke, huge difference.
If I'm a patient I wouldn't know if my nurse or doctor smoked but I damn well would know if they were obese.

I understand that and I agree with you. What you do on your own time is your business. That said see Blackstones comments about insurance above. The same is very true of drugs and alcohol. I really don't care what you do to yourself on your own time but the insurance companies do.
The big catch here is you are free to do what you want for the most part. If you want to work at that hospital or any place else that has these restrictions they you have to play by their rules, however, you are free to smoke, drink, do drugs, or whatever if you would rather do them over get a job at a place like this. I am sure there are other hospitals that do not have this restriction.

luvmylabs23139
07-20-2010, 10:31 AM
I understand that and I agree with you. What you do on your own time is your business. That said see Blackstones comments about insurance above. The same is very true of drugs and alcohol. I really don't care what you do to yourself on your own time but the insurance companies do.
The big catch here is you are free to do what you want for the most part. If you want to work at that hospital or any place else that has these restrictions they you have to play by their rules, however, you are free to smoke, drink, do drugs, or whatever if you would rather do them over get a job at a place like this. I am sure there are other hospitals that do not have this restriction.


Where do you draw the line though? I would not want any nurse or doctor telling me anything about what I do if I can just look at them and know that they do not lead a healthy lifestyle.
BY the way don;t you think that this is discrimination against smokers?
Remember smoking is legal. HOw about the one that drinks? Try and draw the line between a social drinker and an acoholic. If someone is a bit tipsy on the job it can kill a patient.

luvmylabs23139
07-20-2010, 10:36 AM
Neither one is a very healthy lifestyle to be sure. Even swimming 5 miles per day isn't going to keep you from getting lung cancer or emphysema from smoking, so I don’t really think one is better for you than the other.

However, I read a study that said companies can save about $10,000 per year per employee if that employee doesn’t smoke. This was based on healthcare and disability costs, and loss of work time due to smoke breaks.

I'd like to see an honest study that shows the cost of insuring the obese. It is well known that obesity is a main contributing factor to heart disease, diabetes, loss of work time due to eating (food breaks), disability costs etc.

ducknwork
07-20-2010, 10:40 AM
If I'm a patient I wouldn't know if my nurse or doctor smoked but I damn well would know if they were obese.

You obviously haven't been around people that smoke like the people I work around. I can smell their breath from more than a few feet away. One guy used my phone for a couple minutes the other day and after he got done, I had to spray it down with simple green because it absolutely reeked of cigarettes.

badbullgator
07-20-2010, 11:00 AM
Where do you draw the line though? I would not want any nurse or doctor telling me anything about what I do if I can just look at them and know that they do not lead a healthy lifestyle.
BY the way don;t you think that this is discrimination against smokers?
Remember smoking is legal. HOw about the one that drinks? Try and draw the line between a social drinker and an acoholic. If someone is a bit tipsy on the job it can kill a patient.

A licensed practitioner would lose their license, or at least be disciplined, if they were intoxicated. It is called impaired practitioner and there is not legal cutoff. Any level is considered impaired. Different ball of wax. You are missing the point, yes smoking is legal as is drinking (provided you meet the laws set forth, age, driving…) but neither are a right. You may do them but you do not have an inhalable right to do them. The hospital is a PRIVATE entity and can make up their own rules as long as they are within the law. They cannot discriminate on race, nationality, disability, age….and other issues set forth by law, but they can and do discriminate against smokers, drug users, and various other issues not covered by anti-discrimination laws. The difference is that you cannot pick your race, age, or nationality. You can choose to smoke, drink, or do drugs. If you make the decision to smoke you are also making the decision to not be employed by this and many other PRIVATE companies. Nobody is taking a freedom away form you. You are free to decide. As far as the example of overweight goes, not all fat people are fat because they consume 60000 calories a day some are medical issues and addiction. You could argue addiction with smoking, alcohol, and drugs, but you do not have to do any of those to live. You must eat to live.
Now if you want to go another route we can talk about guns at work. Here in Florida and in several other state it is law that a person who can legally possess a gun may have that gun in their vehicle on private employers property, however, the employers can NOT allow you to bring the gun inside with you. In this case you have the right to own a gun and have it on/in YOUR property (car/truck) but not on Private property.

badbullgator
07-20-2010, 11:01 AM
I'd like to see an honest study that shows the cost of insuring the obese. It is well known that obesity is a main contributing factor to heart disease, diabetes, loss of work time due to eating (food breaks), disability costs etc.


There are MANY. Google is your friend. No arguement here from anybody. Again you must eat to live. Not so with smoking, alcohol, or drugs and that is a huge difference

Cody Covey
07-20-2010, 12:45 PM
Its not often people won't go back to a business just because someone is fat. It does happen often that people won't go back to businesses where the staff reaks of smoke I would imagine its the same or worse at a hospital. Not to mention people that are allergic to smoke probably won't liek to have to be sniffing you while you are taking blood etc.

badbullgator
07-20-2010, 12:56 PM
Its not often people won't go back to a business just because someone is fat. It does happen often that people won't go back to businesses where the staff reaks of smoke I would imagine its the same or worse at a hospital. Not to mention people that are allergic to smoke probably won't liek to have to be sniffing you while you are taking blood etc.


Well that depends

http://www.wesh.com/news/24283882/detail.html

Not staff, but still funny, stupid or stoned...maybe all of the above

Cody Covey
07-20-2010, 01:08 PM
definitely all of the above haha

BonMallari
07-20-2010, 03:41 PM
Its not often people won't go back to a business just because someone is fat. It does happen often that people won't go back to businesses where the staff reeks of smoke I would imagine its the same or worse at a hospital. Not to mention people that are allergic to smoke probably won't like to have to be sniffing you while you are taking blood etc.

Bingo...thats why many finer dining restaurant are also adopting the policy of not hiring smokers....they also have a valid argument that employees go and have a smoke and then come back and handle/serve your food....not a pleasant thought ;)

sinner
07-20-2010, 10:24 PM
They are not saying you can't smoke here but rather are saying you can't have a job here of you smoke, huge difference.
If I'm a patient I wouldn't know if my nurse or doctor smoked but I damn well would know if they were obese.

Take you dog in with you! Your smeller must need hospital care.

Steve Hester
07-20-2010, 11:16 PM
Bingo...thats why many finer dining restaurant are also adopting the policy of not hiring smokers....they also have a valid argument that employees go and have a smoke and then come back and handle/serve your food....not a pleasant thought ;)

That's the most rediculous thing I've ever heard of. I would be much more concerned about whether someone didn't wash their hands after going to the bathroom then preparing food, than someone who smoked a cigarette on a break. You can put up all the signs you want that say "employess must wash their hands before returning to work", but that sure as hell doesn't mean they do it. Or how about some non-smoking slob who picks his nose and then handles your food. If you are in the food business, you know there are MUCH worse unsanitary things that go on in commercial food preparation than God forbid, someone smokes a cigarette on their break.:rolleyes:

Clay Rogers
07-21-2010, 01:34 AM
I'd like to see an honest study that shows the cost of insuring the obese. It is well known that obesity is a main contributing factor to heart disease, diabetes, loss of work time due to eating (food breaks), disability costs etc.

I work as an RN in level one trauma ER in greenville nc. We lose more time to nurses sneaking out to smoke than we do nurses sneaking out to eat. Most smokers leave the floor on average 5 times a shift for at least 15 minutes. That equals 1 hour and 15 minutes just to smoke. We are typically too busy to get the normal 30 minute lunch break so if you get 10 minutes your lucky. And the smokers usually take the whole 30 minutes so they can chain smoke. So the average smoker takes 1 hour and 45 minutes to smoke per shift. Big difference there. Also, smoking tends to exacerbate asthma and COPD pt's who are already having trouble breathing. Might be one of the reasons hospitals don't want nurses to smoke. Because lets face it, and sorry if this hurts, but smokers stink, especially the ones that try to cover it up with some high smelling perfume or colonge. It is a proven fact that second hand smoke causes cancer. So when you smoke, you are potentially hurting someone other than yourself. If I eat 20 cheeseburgers a day, the only person I'm hurting is myself. And one more thing, more of my acute MI pt's are skinny men that smoke, most are in good shape, exercise daily and smoke a pack a day or more. And I am sure that your nurse or doctor won't care what you say to them about being fat or obese. Because they know, that you will need them before they need you.