PDA

View Full Version : Shirley Sherrod and Me



Buzz
07-26-2010, 09:43 AM
I was surprised to find out that it was a lie that Van Jones signed a truther petition. I should not have been, given the source of the information.


By VAN JONES
Published: July 24, 2010


I UNDERSTAND how Shirley Sherrod, the Agriculture Department official who was forced to resign last week, must have felt.
Related

Times Topic: Shirley Sherrod
Last year I, too, resigned from an administration job, after I uttered some ill-chosen words about the Republican Party and was accused — falsely — of signing my name to a petition being passed around by 9/11 conspiracy theorists. Partisan Web sites and pundits pounced, and I, too, saw my name go from obscurity to national infamy within hours.

Our situations aren’t exactly the same. Ms. Sherrod’s comments, in which she, a black woman, appeared to admit to racial discrimination against a white couple, were taken far out of context, while I truly did use a vulgarity.

But the way we were treated is strikingly similar, and it reveals a lot about the venal nature of Washington politics in the Internet era. In my case, the media rushed to judgment so quickly that I was never able to make clear that the group put my name on its Web site without my permission. The group finally admitted that it never had my signature, but by then it was too late.

Fortunately, Ms. Sherrod has been offered a new job. But our stories offer cautionary tales to anyone interested in taking a job in national politics.

Life inside the Beltway has become a combination of speed chess and Mortal Kombat: one wrong move can mean political death. In the era of YouTube, Twitter and 24-hour cable news, nobody is safe. Even the lowliest staff member knows that an errant comment could wind up online, making her name synonymous with scandal.

The result is that people at all levels of government are becoming overly cautious, unwilling to venture new opinions or even live regular lives for fear of seeing even the most innocuous comment or photograph used against them, all while trying to protect and improve the country.

The victims aren’t just government employees — the public as well is hurt. The imperative to immediately and constantly churn out news on even the most minor bit of controversy leads news organizations, and partisans posing as news organizations, to cross the line from responsible reporting to dangerous rumor-mongering.

This is exactly what happened to Ms. Sherrod. Andrew Breitbart, a prominent Internet conservative, promoted a misleadingly edited video of her speech; within hours, news outlets of all stripes were promoting it as truth. The White House and N.A.A.C.P. both overreacted, then back-pedaled with egg on their faces. But they are victims, too. The only real winners were Mr. Breitbart and his colleagues, whose Web hits probably numbered in the millions.

Anyone with a laptop and a flip camera can engineer a fake info-virus and inject it into the body politic. Those with cable TV shows and axes to grind can concoct their own realities. The high standards and wise judgments of people like Walter Cronkite once acted as our national immune system, zapping scandal-mongers and quashing wild rumors. As a step toward further democratizing America, we shrunk those old gatekeepers — and ended up weakening democracy’s defenses. Rapidly developing communication technologies did the rest.

The only solution is for Americans to adjust our culture over time to our new media technologies. The information system gives us more data than ever before, faster than ever before. But we don’t yet have the wisdom in place to help us deal with it.

In time, we will. The worst of the partisans will get their comeuppance and become cautionary tales for others. Public leaders will learn to be more transparent. We will teach our children not to rush to judgment. Technology will evolve to better expose fakers.

But the big breakthrough will come not when we are better able to spot the lies. It will come when we are better able to handle the truth about people. We are complex beings; no one is all good or all bad. And people do evolve into better people over their lives — just look at Senator Robert Byrd, who died this month and who entered politics as a segregationist and left as a statesman.

We have to understand that no one can be defined by a single photograph, open-mike gaffe or sound bite. Not even our greatest leaders could have survived if they had to be taken to task for every poorly conceived utterance or youthful demonstration of immature political views. When it comes to politics in the age of Facebook, the killer app to stop the “gotcha” bullies won’t be a technological one — it will be a wiser, more forgiving culture.

Van Jones, a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress and a visiting fellow at Princeton, was the White House special adviser for environmental jobs in 2009.

M&K's Retrievers
07-26-2010, 09:59 AM
I was surprised to find out that it was a lie that Van Jones signed a truther petition. I should not have been, given the source of the information.

What group admitted that he didn't sign the petition?

Hew
07-26-2010, 11:27 AM
Oh gosh. Where to start, where to start?

I know. How 'bout Buzz' comment:



I was surprised to find out that it was a lie that Van Jones signed a truther petition. I should not have been, given the source of the information.


Are you impugning sources? Gee, don't you often lecture us not to shoot the messenger? Or just not shoot your mesengers?

As for Van Jones's self-serving crap...

His name was on that truther petition (one of 99 supposedly prominent people) sine 2004. It took him 5 years to discover that? BS. Moreover, if the media supposedly lied or was negligent in their fact checking then you might want to air your gripes to the Obama Administration. When the Jones contraversy erupted the Administration's position was not that he didn't sign it, but that he didn't thoroughly read it before signing it. So who was the liar...the Obama Admin. or Jones?



He did not explain how his name came to be on the petition. An administration source said Jones says he did not carefully review the language in the petition before agreeing to add his name.* http://blogs.abcnews.com/politicalpunch/2009/09/controversial-obama-administration-official-denies-being-part-of-911-truther-movement-apologizes-for.html


I particularly chuckled at Jones' crocodile tears about partisanship; coming from the guy who called the Congressional GOP "arseholes."

That guy is a POS. That he's trying to rehabilitate himself by equating his situation to Sherrod's (the same way a bowling ball is like a pear) is par for the course with that serious arsehole. Sorry, for the partisanship, Van.

luvmylabs23139
07-26-2010, 12:08 PM
Van Jones (an admitted comunist) has never denied that the signature was his. He has only claimed that he didn't realize what he signed.