PDA

View Full Version : Shariah Law



Gerry Clinchy
08-16-2010, 10:51 PM
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/38724568/ns/world_news-south_and_central_asia

This article recounts the stoning execution of a young couple for adultery in a Taliban-controlled area of A'stan.

A link within the article describes what such an execution entails & in what countries it is part of their law.

It occurs to me that because this is considered part of a religion, what happens if a Muslim congregation were to attempt to do this in the US. At what point does the Constitution permit secular authorities to interfere with religious practice?

What about female mutilation?

depittydawg
08-16-2010, 11:54 PM
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/38724568/ns/world_news-south_and_central_asia

This article recounts the stoning execution of a young couple for adultery in a Taliban-controlled area of A'stan.

A link within the article describes what such an execution entails & in what countries it is part of their law.

It occurs to me that because this is considered part of a religion, what happens if a Muslim congregation were to attempt to do this in the US. At what point does the Constitution permit secular authorities to interfere with religious practice?

What about female mutilation?

I think you probably know that answer to that before you posed the question. Mormon's are one religion that comes to mind that are restricted in practicing their beliefs when they involve willful disobedience to other laws. I also remember back in the 60's and 70's a few enterprising druggies started up religions that called congestion of LSD or Peyote and other psychedelics a sacrament. I believe they all ended up in prison.

M&K's Retrievers
08-17-2010, 12:33 AM
I think you probably know that answer to that before you posed the question. Mormon's are one religion that comes to mind that are restricted in practicing their beliefs when they involve willful disobedience to other laws. I also remember back in the 60's and 70's a few enterprising druggies started up religions that called congestion of LSD or Peyote and other psychedelics a sacrament. I believe they all ended up in prison.

They went to prison for crowding?

charly_t
08-17-2010, 01:44 AM
They went to prison for crowding?

I think he meant chest congestion .......;) Isn't it wonderful how our school systems teach our children such diverse meanings for words anymore. And diverse spellings. I hope no one is counting my mistakes though. Old lady regards.

M&K's Retrievers
08-17-2010, 01:57 AM
I think he meant chest congestion .......;) Isn't it wonderful how our school systems teach our children such diverse meanings for words anymore. And diverse spellings. I hope no one is counting my mistakes though. Old lady regards.

I think he meant ingestion.

Old fart regards:p

charly_t
08-17-2010, 02:07 AM
I think he meant ingestion.

Old fart regards:p

It's more fun to speculate on meanings where the "children" are concerned :-) I tease my grandkids all the time........Depitty reminds me of one of them ;) but Depitty won't tell his age so I can compare them.

YardleyLabs
08-17-2010, 06:52 AM
Stoning is permitted for a number of crimes in the Old Testament (list follows). As a matter of practice, however, Jews gave up stoning, in particular, and capital punishment in general around 2000 years ago. That was possible because Jews, unlike some modern Christians, do not believe in the Old Testament Bible (Torah) as a literal document fixed across time. It is interpreted and reinterpreted through an on-going judicial like process, particularly in matter concerning biblical law. The Talmud is a compilation encompassing centuries of rabbinical discussions of Jewish law, philosophy and tradition that is studied widely. However, new cases are heard by rabbinical courts looking not to a straightforward set of written dictates, but to a mix or oral and written religious decisions that has evolved in much the same way as English Common Law. Only one country has explicitly defined relationships between the administration of Talmudic or Jewish law and civil law -- Israel. However, within orthodox Jewish communities, there remains a more or less formal Jewish court process that may be invoked. It is parallel to the civil authority of the country and is not recognized outside of Israel. While such a court could theoretically order the execution of an offender by stoning, that would not be tolerated by the civil authority.

Catholics, by contrast, have a much more formal judicial process for administering church (canonical) law. When Catholicism was the official law of many countries, that law took on its own force and was given primacy over the laws of the state. In both Italy and France, for example, divorce was only recognized when granted by the Church as an annulment as recently as the 1960's. In other areas, civil law was simply influenced by Church mandates. Thus, in those same countries birth control and voluntary sterilization (e.g. tubal ligation) were crimes.

Sharia is the Islamic equivalent In its structure it is closer to Talmudic law than to Canonical law. The building blocks are different depending on the sect. It includes the Koran, the oral history of comments attributed to Mohamed (which many believe prohibited all capital punishment), and and then include written and oral commentary by a range of different people over the ages. Only a handful of countries give Sharia law an official position: Iran, Afghanistan, etc. In other countries, Sharia law may be called upon by any Muslim. As with Talmudic or Canonical law, however, this is a process that exists outside of the civil judiciary system and may or may not be condoned in whole or part by civil law. Thus, a Sharia court may order death by stoning. However, the civil authority may well imprison anyone involved in the execution for murder.

Generally, stoning is a way of carrying out a verdict of capital punishment. It is in the same category as execution by hanging, firing squad, electric chair, etc. Very few countries in the world permit capital punishment. The US is one of them. As a country, we execute only about 50-60 people per year. However, we sentence many more than that to death each year. Our reactions to stoning is based on two factors: we object to the method of killing which we consider primitive and inhumane, and we object to some of the crimes (e.g. adultery) for which the penalty is assessed because we do not view them as sufficiently serious. However, I suspect that most on this forum support the death penalty in principle and feel it should be used more frequently. What is interesting, is that most of the world views our own system of capital punishment with almost equal horror and, in most, it is illegal to extradite prisoners to the United States for capital crimes unless the government first agrees that capital punishment will not be invoked.

Biblical cries for which stoning is the indicated punishment (from Wikipedia):



Bestiality (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bestiality) committed by man (Lev. xx. 15; Sanh. vii. 4, 54b; Sifra, Ḳedoshim, x. 1; Mek., Mishpaṭim, 17).
Bestiality committed by woman (Lev. xx. 16: Sanh. vii. 4, 54b; Sifra, Ḳedoshim, x. 3; Mek., Mishpaṭim, 17).
Blasphemy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blasphemy) (Lev. xxiv. 16; Sanh. vii. 4, 43a; Sifra, Emor, xix.).
Criminal conversation with a betrothed virgin (Deut. xxii. 23, 24; Sanh. vii. 4, 66b; Sifre, Deut. 242).
Criminal conversation with one's own daughter-in-law (Lev. xx. 12; Sanh. vii. 4, 53a; Sifra, Ḳedoshim, ix. 13).
Criminal conversation with one's own mother (Lev. xviii. 7, xx. 11; Sanh. vii. 4, 53a; Sifra, Ḳedoshim, ix. 12).
Criminal conversation with one's own stepmother (Lev. xviii. 8, xx. 11; Sanh. vii. 4, 53a; Sifra, Ḳedoshim, ix. 12).
Cursing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cursing) a parent (Lev. xx. 9; Sanh. vii. 4, 66a; Mek., Mishpaṭim, 17; Sifra, Ḳedoshim, ix. 7).
Enticing individuals to idolatry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Idolatry): "Mesit" (Deut. xiii. 712 [A. V. 611]; Sanh. vii. 4, 67a; Sifre, Deut. 90).
Idolatry (Deut. xvii. 27; Sanh. vii. 4, 60b; Sifre, Deut. 149).
Instigating communities to idolatry: "Maddiaḥ" (Deut. xiii. 26 [A. V. 15]; Sanh. vii. 4, 67a; Sifre, Deut. 86).
Necromancy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Necromancy) (Lev. xx. 27; Sanh. vii. 4, 65a; Sifra, Ḳedoshim, xi., end).
Offering one's own children to Molech (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_sacrifice) (Lev. xx. 2; Sanh. vii. 4, 64a; Sifra, Ḳedoshim, viii., parashah 10, beginning).
Pederasty (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pederasty) (Lev. xx. 13; Sanh. vii. 4, 54a; Sifra, Ḳedoshim, ix. 14).
Rebelling (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebellion) against parents (Deut. xxi. 1821; Sanh. vii. 4, 68b; Sifre, Deut. 220).
Shabbath (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shabbath)-breaking (Num. xv. 3236; Sanh. vii. 4; Sifre, Num. 114).
Witchcraft (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Witchcraft) (Ex. xxii. 17 [A. V. 18]; Sanh. vii. 4, 67a; Mek., Mishpaṭim, 17).For those who believe that the Bible as a whole is inerrant across time, should these remain as capital crimes today?

ducknwork
08-17-2010, 07:19 AM
Yardley, you should know this, as it has been said on here before, quite recently actually. The Old Testament is more of a 'history book'. The New Testament is after Jesus came along. When He came, and especially when He died for us, we have a new covenant in Him. The rules of the game changed when He taught us the way to live.




28 One of the scribes, when he came forward and heard them disputing and saw how well he had answered them, asked him, "Which is the first of all the commandments?"
29
Jesus replied, "The first is this: 'Hear, O Israel! The Lord our God is Lord alone!
30
You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, with all your mind, and with all your strength.'
31
The second is this: 'You shall love your neighbor as yourself.' There is no other commandment greater than these."
32
The scribe said to him, "Well said, teacher. You are right in saying, 'He is One and there is no other than he.'
33
And 'to love him with all your heart, with all your understanding, with all your strength, and to love your neighbor as yourself' is worth more than all burnt offerings and sacrifices." 34
And when Jesus saw that (he) answered with understanding, he said to him, "You are not far from the kingdom of God." And no one dared to ask him any more questions.

Gerry Clinchy
08-17-2010, 04:33 PM
In the other link within the article mentions that Koran does not actually mention stoning, so that is something added by the Shariah law.

One might liken that to the Roman Catholic practice, at one time, that said that eating meet on Friday was a mortal sin. As far as I know that it no longer the case. The Church changed it because it was a "custom" rather than part of the Biblical directive. So, it would seem that Shariah Law could also be changed without changing the "word of God" (according to Islam).

The article also mentioned that even thought stoning actually DID appear in the Bible ... but even so Christianity and Judaism seemed not to have a problem abandoning such a barbaric form of punishment. It seems that, generally, (with certainly some aberrant exceptions), Christians and Jews have moved toward the loving image of God v. the wrathful image.


I think that The New Testament influenced Judaism in this respect, just as the wrathful image and legalism of Judaism probably influenced such dark moments of Christianity like The Inquisition and the Salem witch trials.

It is interesting that Jesus was viewed as a great teacher even by Islam, though those teachings seem to have had less effect on the practice of Islam. I think it is worth noting that Jesus is a figure acknowledged by all three religions, if not as God incarnate, as a teacher of some significance.

I believe that there is a cultural difference that makes it harder for the West to accept the extremeness of Shariah Law, based on the evolution mentioned above WRT Christians and Jews. Couched in more secular terms, it is related to the emphasis, perhaps, on each individual as a worthy creation of God v. "law" being most important.

YardleyLabs
08-17-2010, 05:07 PM
In the other link within the article mentions that Koran does not actually mention stoning, so that is something added by the Shariah law.

One might liken that to the Roman Catholic practice, at one time, that said that eating meet on Friday was a mortal sin. As far as I know that it no longer the case. The Church changed it because it was a "custom" rather than part of the Biblical directive. So, it would seem that Shariah Law could also be changed without changing the "word of God" (according to Islam).

The article also mentioned that even thought stoning actually DID appear in the Bible ... but even so Christianity and Judaism seemed not to have a problem abandoning such a barbaric form of punishment. It seems that, generally, (with certainly some aberrant exceptions), Christians and Jews have moved toward the loving image of God v. the wrathful image.


I think that The New Testament influenced Judaism in this respect, just as the wrathful image and legalism of Judaism probably influenced such dark moments of Christianity like The Inquisition and the Salem witch trials.

It is interesting that Jesus was viewed as a great teacher even by Islam, though those teachings seem to have had less effect on the practice of Islam. I think it is worth noting that Jesus is a figure acknowledged by all three religions, if not as God incarnate, as a teacher of some significance.

I believe that there is a cultural difference that makes it harder for the West to accept the extremeness of Shariah Law, based on the evolution mentioned above WRT Christians and Jews. Couched in more secular terms, it is related to the emphasis, perhaps, on each individual as a worthy creation of God v. "law" being most important.
Sharia law, as I noted in an earlier post, is not written in the form of the Talmud or of Canonical law. It includes the Koran, statements attributed to Mohamed before his death (one of which appeared to forbid stoning according to some interpretations), and writings by various religious figures that vary depending on the sect of Islam. Ultimately it is decided not based on written law but based on the decision of a religious court responsible only to itself. In those countries that have adopted Islam as the official religion, more formal judicial and appellate structures have been put in place.

When looking into Obama's comments about a post Ramadan dinner for the Tunisian emissary, I found an interesting anecdote in the Jefferson Encyclopedia:

For his part, the Tunisian was surprised at the social freedom women enjoyed in America and was especially intrigued by several delegations of Native Americans from the western territories then visiting Washington. Mellimelli inquired which prophet the Indians followed: Moses, Jesus Christ or Mohammed. When he was told none of them, that they worshiped “the Great Sprit” alone, he was reported to have pronounced them “vile hereticks.”
Mohamed was explicit that Islam was based on Judaism and Christianity. He viewed Moses and Christ as great prophets, just as he viewed himself as a great prophet. He considered the Bible to be a foundation of Islam and much of the Koran derives from those roots.

Christians began as Jews, and considered themselves to be Jews even after the death of Christ. Within the framework of Judaism, Christians believed Christ to be the Messiah and could not understand those Jews who rejected him.

In the same manner, Mohamed and his followers viewed Christ as a great prophet and Mohamed as a great prophet, but not the Messiah. Rather, Mohamed was simply another great prophet helping to clarify the word of God. A fundamental tenet of the religion from its beginnings in the 7th century, was that, while Jews and Christians were obviously wrong in not accepting Mohamed as the more recent true prophet of God, that their religious beliefs must be respected and that they must be able to practice their religions and not be coerced into becoming Muslim.

Obviously, however, that hint of peace did not last. While Judaism actively discouraged religious conversion and viewed religion as essentially tribal (that is, the Jews were the chosen people of God, and others were welcome to teir own gods and traditions), Christians and Muslims shared an evangelical commitment (that is, a commitment to converting non-believers), and a belief in religious supremacy (that is, a belief that their own religions were universally correct and others must, therefore, be wrong). The movements by European Christians to gain and retain control of the Holy Lands, and the movement of Islam toward Europe following a rapid expansion through the Arab countries and North Africa, guaranteed the collisions that followed.

By the way, the elimination of stoning in Judaism dates to the period when Christ was still living, so it is hard to say whether the egg or the chicken came first.

Gerry Clinchy
08-17-2010, 08:28 PM
That history lesson, Jeff, makes it all the more sad that 3 major religions of the world that have so much in common should end up at such odds with each other in so many places in the world.

Joe S.
08-18-2010, 09:07 AM
That history lesson, Jeff, makes it all the more sad that 3 major religions of the world that have so much in common should end up at such odds with each other in so many places in the world.

When dealing with matters of ego and righteousness, it is easier to fight about what separates us rather than celebrate what joins us.

Not A Sermon Just A Thought Regards,

Joe S.

david gibson
08-18-2010, 09:45 AM
.............

Generally, stoning is a way of carrying out a verdict of capital punishment. It is in the same category as execution by hanging, firing squad, electric chair, etc. Very few countries in the world permit capital punishment. The US is one of them. As a country, we execute only about 50-60 people per year. However, we sentence many more than that to death each year. Our reactions to stoning is based on two factors: we object to the method of killing which we consider primitive and inhumane, and we object to some of the crimes (e.g. adultery) for which the penalty is assessed because we do not view them as sufficiently serious. However, I suspect that most on this forum support the death penalty in principle and feel it should be used more frequently. What is interesting, is that most of the world views our own system of capital punishment with almost equal horror and, in most, it is illegal to extradite prisoners to the United States for capital crimes unless the government first agrees that capital punishment will not be invoked.

.........

you are omitting one very major point (no surprise) - there is often no trial at all and no appeal process, and the punishment is often carried out immediately as it was this week with the young couple this week in A-stan by rounding up passers-by.

comparing this to our system of capital punishment is beneath all but only you.

oh - care to delve in to the merits of sharia law as it relates to rape and the rights a woman has there? try comparing that to our system.

you are one america-hating liberal piece of work.

YardleyLabs
08-18-2010, 09:56 AM
you are omitting one very major point (no surprise) - there is often no trial at all and no appeal process, and the punishment is often carried out immediately as it was this week with the young couple this week in A-stan by rounding up passers-by.

comparing this to our system of capital punishment is beneath all but only you.

oh - care to delve in to the merits of sharia law as it relates to rape and the rights a woman has there? try comparing that to our system.

you are one america-hating liberal piece of work.
The Afghanistan couple was killed by the Taliban, an illegal terrorist organization, not by any recognized judicial structure or process. Your analogy is equivalent to calling a mob lynching of a rape suspect an example of American justice.

"you are one america-hating liberal piece of work" -- I see you came back from your river trip no smarter than you left.

david gibson
08-18-2010, 10:02 AM
The Afghanistan couple was killed by the Taliban, an illegal terrorist organization, not by any recognized judicial structure or process. Your analogy is equivalent to calling a mob lynching of a rape suspect an example of American justice.

"you are one america-hating liberal piece of work" -- I see you came back from your river trip no smarter than you left.


oh yeah and like that goes on everyday here in america so you defend your comparison of sharia law to our system.????:confused: sharia law is carried out far far far more often than "mob lynching" in america. seen the recent cover of Time?

care to compare the stats of "mob lynchings" for rape that have occurred here to the female circumcision, stonings, lashes, cutting off noses and hands, etc in the third world arabic cesspool?

your typical bs

and i didnt take a river trip. pay attention. you cant even get that part right.

YardleyLabs
08-18-2010, 10:07 AM
oh yeah and like that goes on everyday here in america so you defend your comparison of sharia law to our system.????:confused: sharia law is carried out far far far more often than "mob lynching" in america. seen the recent cover of Time?

care to compare the stats of "mob lynchings" for rape that have occurred here to the female circumcision, stonings, lashes, cutting off noses and hands, etc in the third world arabic cesspool?

your typical bs

and i didnt take a river trip. pay attention. you cant even get that part right.

Lynching is not at all common in America, although it used to be a little more common than anyone would like to admit. Stoning is not at all common in the Muslim world and is completely illegal in most Muslim countries.

As to your vacation, I thought I was paying attention, but really couldn't care less.


i will be out on an extended sojourn - 50% work and 50% play - Ruidoso NM, the Columbia River along the OR/WA border (any border crossing issues there just let me know - i bring expert advise! ) then Post Falls ID area and finally 5 days in Glacier NP to close out the period. maybe you will get lucky and i mite get aten by a grizzle bar! lord knows i will be looking for them, i love them critters........

carry on guys, i will have intermittent internet access but first comes my geology and photo business, any time left over will be spent straightening out the folks stricken by pedophilia and bestiality.......lord please keep that to a minimum......

david gibson
08-18-2010, 10:10 AM
Lynching is not at all common in America, although it used to be a little more common than anyone would like to admit. Stoning is not at all common in the Muslim world and is completely illegal in most Muslim countries.

As to your vacation, I thought I was paying attention, but really couldn't care less.

glad you took the time to search my post. i am 300 yds from the columbia river as i type. i am working. i am not tubing down the river with a mai-tai (too gay for me, but i am sure you would enjoy it)

pay closer attention next time. look for clues like "rafting", "fishing" - that would be a "river trip".

road kill
08-18-2010, 12:48 PM
The Afghanistan couple was killed by the Taliban, an illegal terrorist organization, not by any recognized judicial structure or process. Your analogy is equivalent to calling a mob lynching of a rape suspect an example of American justice.

"you are one america-hating liberal piece of work" -- I see you came back from your river trip no smarter than you left.

Really......where are they "illegal?"
And what does that mean anyway, based on your position on "illegal" aliens in the USA??



RK

YardleyLabs
08-18-2010, 01:00 PM
[quote=YardleyLabs;662588]Lynching is not at all common in America, although it used to be a little more common than anyone would like to admit. Stoning is not at all common in the Muslim world and is completely illegal in most Muslim countries.


I don't think that's true. Stoning is still legal in Iran, Nigeria, Pakistan, Sudan, and the United Arab Emirates. It was supposed to be outlawed in Iran, but the law was never removed from the books, so they're still free to have at it.
And some think it's more common then you think, as many local community stoning sentences are carried out and not reported.
Walt
It seems to me that every time there is a death sentence involving stoning that it ends up being publicized pretty widely. Nations everywhere protest, and in many, if not most cases a way is found to commute the sentence. The big exception historically was Saudi Arabia. Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International both make an effort to track such executions.

Based on data from Amnesty International, the top 10 countries for executions (this excludes such extra judicial killings as the genocide in Sudan) in 2009 were:

Countries by Rank - most recent data (2009)

China: 470 executions
Iran: 317 executions
Saudi Arabia: 143 executions
Pakistan: 135 executions
Congo, Democratic Republic of the: 100 executions
Egypt: 48 executions
United States: 42 executions
Iraq: 33 executions
Taiwan: 32 executions
Vietnam: 25 executionsIf data are considered based on executions per million population, none of the top ten remain in the top ten except for Iran. Most, including the united States, remain in the top 20. (Source: http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/cri_exe-crime-executions)


The United States is in an interesting position since the number of people sentenced to death each year is about three times the number executed. Accordingly, the number awaiting execution on death row continues to grow.

YardleyLabs
08-18-2010, 02:14 PM
[quote=YardleyLabs;662698][quote=walt8@cox.net;662671]
It seems to me that every time there is a death sentence involving stoning that it ends up being publicized pretty widely. Nations everywhere protest, and in many, if not most cases a way is found to commute the sentence.


Yeah, but Jeff, it seemed to you that most illegal aliens in this country were here on expired visa's. :) Here's a happy face, just to keep things civil.
Walt
Actually the information concerning the number of illegals resident in the country comes from surveys done by the Pew Foundation.
"Nearly half the twelve million people illegally in the country didn't cross the desert or pay a smuggler. According to the Pew Hispanic Center, they crossed legally at a port of entry just like this one at Douglas, Arizona." Source: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5485917

Similar estimates have been produced by the INS but they are older.

road kill
08-18-2010, 02:27 PM
[quote=walt8@cox.net;662718][quote=YardleyLabs;662698]
Actually the information concerning the number of illegals resident in the country comes from surveys done by the Pew Foundation.
"Nearly half the twelve million people illegally in the country didn't cross the desert or pay a smuggler. According to the Pew Hispanic Center, they crossed legally at a port of entry just like this one at Douglas, Arizona." Source: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5485917

Similar estimates have been produced by the INS but they are older.


Really??

"Illegal Aliens are not immigrants!

About 60% of the illegal alien population are "undocumented aliens," who are commonly known as "unlawful border crossers," or more properly known as "illegal aliens."

About 40% of the U.S. illegal alien population are "documented aliens," who are commonly known as "visa overstayers."

The visa overstayers hold non-immigrant visas such as the H-1B skilled foreign worker visa.

Therefore, it is not possible for the holder of an expired non-immigrant visa to become an "immigrant" as a result of staying beyond the visa duration.

If you don't believe that visa overstayers were issued "non-immigrant visas" see this http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.eb1d4c2a3e5b9ac89243c6a7543f6d1a/?vgnextoid=92f23e4d77d73210VgnVCM100000082ca60aRCR D&vgnextchannel=92f23e4d77d73210VgnVCM100000082ca60a RCRD page."


RK

troy schwab
08-18-2010, 02:56 PM
[quote=walt8@cox.net;662718][quote=YardleyLabs;662698]
Actually the information concerning the number of illegals resident in the country comes from surveys done by the Pew Foundation.
"Nearly half the twelve million people illegally in the country didn't cross the desert or pay a smuggler. According to the Pew Hispanic Center, they crossed legally at a port of entry just like this one at Douglas, Arizona." Source: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5485917

Similar estimates have been produced by the INS but they are older.

That is one of the funniest references I have ever seen...... Seriously, Jeff? Did the 12 million illegals provide them with this information? Really, because if the Pew foundation knows of illegal immigrants living in the US, they would be guilty of obstruction of justice, or something similar, I believe....... What a crock! Either way its 12 million too many........ JMO

troy schwab
08-18-2010, 03:03 PM
[quote=walt8@cox.net;662671]
It seems to me that every time there is a death sentence involving stoning that it ends up being publicized pretty widely. Nations everywhere protest, and in many, if not most cases a way is found to commute the sentence. The big exception historically was Saudi Arabia. Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International both make an effort to track such executions.

Based on data from Amnesty International, the top 10 countries for executions (this excludes such extra judicial killings as the genocide in Sudan) in 2009 were:

Countries by Rank - most recent data (2009)

China: 470 executions
Iran: 317 executions
Saudi Arabia: 143 executions
Pakistan: 135 executions
Congo, Democratic Republic of the: 100 executions
Egypt: 48 executions
United States: 42 executions
Iraq: 33 executions
Taiwan: 32 executions
Vietnam: 25 executionsIf data are considered based on executions per million population, none of the top ten remain in the top ten except for Iran. Most, including the united States, remain in the top 20. (Source: http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/cri_exe-crime-executions)


The United States is in an interesting position since the number of people sentenced to death each year is about three times the number executed. Accordingly, the number awaiting execution on death row continues to grow.

Jeff, seriously...... your data source are losing all credibility......... Do you think they issue permits for stoning or something....... These are documented government executions...... so your "taliban" executions are not included..... Stoning occurs waaaay more often than your bleeding heart will ever admit. Im pretty sure each tribe doesnt send a quarterly newsletter to the government telling them who they stoned..... These numbers are crap, like a lot of your arguements lately. Sorry bud.

ducknwork
08-18-2010, 03:21 PM
[quote=walt8@cox.net;662671]
It seems to me that every time there is a death sentence involving stoning that it ends up being publicized pretty widely.

Just curious...

If there was a stoning sentence that wasn't publicized, you wouldn't know about it would you? That being said, you can't really say every time...




On a side note, didn't we have a thread a while back about most of you guys wanting to legalize getting stoned? I even remember a few of you saying that it was not possible to get stoned to death! :confused:

road kill
08-18-2010, 03:24 PM
[QUOTE=YardleyLabs;662698]

Just curious...

If there was a stoning sentence that wasn't publicized, you wouldn't know about it would you? That being said, you can't really say every time...




On a side note, didn't we have a thread a while back about most of you guys wanting to legalize getting stoned? I even remember a few of you saying that it was not possible to get stoned to death! :confused:

But obviously they are still trying!!
Legal or not.......




RK