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View Full Version : Police: SC woman kills dog because it chewed Bible



Roger Perry
01-25-2011, 01:02 PM
COLUMBIA, S.C. — Authorities have charged a South Carolina woman with felony animal cruelty, saying she hanged her nephew's pit bull from a tree with an electrical cord and burned its body because the dog chewed on her Bible.
Animal control officers said Monday that 65-year-old Miriam Smith told them she killed a female dog named Diamond because it was a "devil dog" and she worried it could harm neighborhood children. Authorities said bond wasn't immediately set for Smith, who remains jailed in Spartanburg County after her weekend arrest.
Officials said she didn't have an attorney yet.
She faces 180 days to five years in prison if convicted.
Authorities say the remains of the dog were found under a pile of grass with part of an electrical cord around its neck.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/41240379/ns/us_news/

ducknwork
01-26-2011, 07:19 AM
I don't agree with her methods, but one less pit bull isn't a bad thing...

Ken Bora
01-26-2011, 07:41 AM
Such a sad thing to say.
I think one more dog torturing, bible thumping,
Close minded idiot, behind bars…….
Isn’t a bad thing.

A devil dog, gosh this world is just too full of stupid people.






.

ducknwork
01-26-2011, 08:54 AM
I think one more dog torturing, bible thumping,
Close minded idiot, behind bars…….
Isn’t a bad thing.[/FONT]






.


Yep, that's not bad either.

Blackstone
01-26-2011, 11:01 AM
I don't agree with her methods, but one less pit bull isn't a bad thing...

There's nothing wrong with pit bulls as a breed. There are just bad owners and bad breeders.

david gibson
01-26-2011, 11:39 AM
There's nothing wrong with pit bulls as a breed. There are just bad owners and bad breeders.

I don't think it is quite that black and white. You may find this study interesting:

http://www.dogbitelaw.com/Dog%20Attacks%201982%20to%202006%20Clifton.pdf

Although there are certainly very nice pit bulls that are very calm, the data does show that there are inherent problems with the breed. Certainly bad owners and bad breeders add to the problem, but if you look at the facts the number of serious dog attacks causing death or permanent disfigurement are overwhelmingly in the camp of pit bulls, rottweilers, and presa canarios, and of the three pit bulls are responsible for another disproportionate share. These breeds are able to cause much more harm. If a collie, poodle, or other breed has a bad moment they snap and bite, but don't maul. The potential damage from a pit bull is off the scale. And when you take the population of the breed into account - something less than 1% of all dogs, the numbers scream even louder.

Again, there are bad breeders and owners, but looking at the numbers it is difficult to argue that all these very serious attacks are the result of the owner/breeder. In fact, the author found that in 2/3 of the cases, the death or disfigurement of the human was the first time the dog ever showed an aggressive attitude, so it is not just dogs bred to be mean or to fight.

The "its the owners, not the breed" mentality is shared by many, but it is only fueled by emotion, there are no facts to back it up whereas the facts in the link tell a pretty convincing story. I know several pit bulls and I really like the dogs, but as I told my sister in law, with grandchildren around, why on earth would you take this risk based on the data? Children poke and grab ears and pull tail, its what kids do, and that is a bad combination with certain breeds.

ducknwork
01-26-2011, 12:17 PM
There's nothing wrong with pit bulls as a breed. There are just bad owners and bad breeders.

You can train a beagle to retrieve and it can do a good job...but one day, a rabbit is going to run past it and instincts are going to take over...

What are pit bulls instincts telling it to do?

Ken Bora
01-27-2011, 08:58 AM
...What are pit bulls instincts telling it to do?


Um.....
Chase Cows ?? :rolleyes:

been bitten by more bunny hounds than I can shake a stick at.

Chris Atkinson
01-27-2011, 10:45 AM
I don't agree with her methods, but one less pit bull isn't a bad thing...

DNW,

Maybe one day you may change your mind.

I think at one point I may have felt that way, to a certain extent.

I disagree with your statement and think that when we express ourselves painting with such a broad brush, it reflects poorly.

Chris

ducknwork
01-27-2011, 11:42 AM
DNW,

Maybe one day you may change your mind.

I think at one point I may have felt that way, to a certain extent.

I disagree with your statement and think that when we express ourselves painting with such a broad brush, it reflects poorly.

Chris

I will keep the rest of my opinions on the subject to myself...we are all entitled to our own opinion, but I know that if you are doing any posting on POTUS, it's not a good sign...so I'll shutup.

Chris Atkinson
01-27-2011, 11:45 AM
I will keep the rest of my opinions on the subject to myself...we are all entitled to our own opinion, but I know that if you are doing any posting on POTUS, it's not a good sign...so I'll shutup.

We are entitled to our own opinion. If you actually train, handle, or spend time around some pits, you may relax your position a little bit.

Just for the fun of it, I went ahead and read the original post in this thread, but replaced the word pit with black labrador. If you want, feel free to read the whole thread and put the word lab in there. See how the story makes you feel.

Frankly, I hope they pursue this woman to the fullest extent of the law. (which probably isn't much since it's "just a dog" and a pit at that)

ducknwork
01-27-2011, 11:52 AM
We are entitled to our own opinion. If you actually train, handle, or spend time around some pits, you may relax your position a little bit.

Just for the fun of it, I went ahead and read the original post in this thread, but replaced the word pit with black labrador. If you want, feel free to read the whole thread and put the word lab in there. See how the story makes you feel.

Frankly, I hope they pursue this woman to the fullest extent of the law. (which probably isn't much since it's "just a dog" and a pit at that)

My lab is yellow, so....

Just kidding!!

I never said that I agreed with what she did. I think it is absolutely horrendous. At the same time, it just doesn't break my heart to see one less pit bull in the world. I don't see any use for the breed and think they are far too dangerous for people to own, especially those who do not care for their animals (training, containment, etc) the way they should. I have yet to hear of a case where a black lab mauled a 3 year old to death. I don't think I need to google the same phrase but replace 'lab' with 'pit'.

Let me know if I need to pipe down...just your presence in POTUS gives me the impression that my posts were reported...

And Ken, you may have been bitten by a beagle, but when is the last time one mauled someone to death?

Chris Atkinson
01-27-2011, 12:01 PM
It's true I don't come to POTUS much.

Nobody reported your post.

I just came to really change my opinion on pits in the last year, so these sorts of comments catch my eye.

ducknwork
01-27-2011, 12:06 PM
It's true I don't come to POTUS much.

Nobody reported your post.

I just came to really change my opinion on pits in the last year, so these sorts of comments catch my eye.

Understood.:D

Marvin S
01-27-2011, 01:11 PM
It's true I don't come to POTUS much.

Nobody reported your post.

I just came to really change my opinion on pits in the last year, so these sorts of comments catch my eye.

Having owned & helped my wife run a large boarding kennel for 20 years I have reached this fact filled conclusion: There are few bad dogs but there are many owners that should be locked up!!!!!!!!

Pits are not a big problem , but all to often are owned by some one not playing with a full deck. At the kennel our biggest issue was with the Rottweiler owners, some pathetically poorly cared for & ill mannered dogs. Most were told to make other arrangements for their next outing, we did not want to deal with their issues. You could recognize the dogs that would be an issue as soon as the owner stepped out of their vehicle :o.

But a long time OB trainer told me, watch the Samoyeds, Chows, & Saints, they'll take you without a show of emotion.

With the resources today anyone who abuses any animal deserves prosecution to the full extent of the law. Unfortunately for the taxpayers, but for many of them, jail is a better set of living conditions than they ever created for themselves. Possibly the best punishment would be for those who abuse dogs to receive the same treatment themselves!!!!

When I was in college & as it was small we got a lot of attention, the English Department took it upon themselves to get me to upgrade the quality of books I read, for which I will be forever grateful. The Head of the Dept loaned me an irreplaceable classic, which my pet proceeded to chew the corner off of. When I presented the evidence to him, his only comment "I hope you digested as much of the book as the dog".

Eric Johnson
01-27-2011, 01:23 PM
The Merritt Clifton study has largely been dis-credited. Partially because he has no credible source for the numbers since the CDC stopped classifying bites by breed. He's simply using newspaper reports as I recall.

There was a case in Ohio (Tellings v. Toledo) over the Toledo ban of "pit bulls." The ruling by the judge summarized all the evidence presented including vet and anatomy experts. Their testimony was that there was no physiological different between a PB and the jaw of other dogs. Further, the "pressure" studies that claim X pounds per square inch were discredited as there's simply no way to effectively measure jaw pressure.

Upon appeal, it was over-turned but not on the evidence. The Ohio Supreme Ct ruled as a matter of something else. The Toledo attorney reportedly stole evidence between the cases so that the plaintiff couldn't use it in the arguments the second time.

Eric

mjh345
01-27-2011, 01:30 PM
But a long time OB trainer told me, watch the Samoyeds, Chows, & Saints, they'll take you without a show of emotion.

".Add the "cuddly Disney" Dalmation to this list

M&K's Retrievers
01-27-2011, 01:48 PM
....

The Head of the Dept loaned me an irreplaceable classic, which my pet proceeded to chew the corner off of. When I presented the evidence to him, his only comment "I hope you digested as much of the book as the dog".

Did you feed him the Cliff Notes as a snack?:p:D

Chris Atkinson
01-27-2011, 03:18 PM
Having owned & helped my wife run a large boarding kennel for 20 years I have reached this fact filled conclusion: There are few bad dogs but there are many owners that should be locked up!!!!!!!!

Pits are not a big problem , but all to often are owned by some one not playing with a full deck. At the kennel our biggest issue was with the Rottweiler owners, some pathetically poorly cared for & ill mannered dogs. Most were told to make other arrangements for their next outing, we did not want to deal with their issues. You could recognize the dogs that would be an issue as soon as the owner stepped out of their vehicle :o.

But a long time OB trainer told me, watch the Samoyeds, Chows, & Saints, they'll take you without a show of emotion.

With the resources today anyone who abuses any animal deserves prosecution to the full extent of the law. Unfortunately for the taxpayers, but for many of them, jail is a better set of living conditions than they ever created for themselves. Possibly the best punishment would be for those who abuse dogs to receive the same treatment themselves!!!!

When I was in college & as it was small we got a lot of attention, the English Department took it upon themselves to get me to upgrade the quality of books I read, for which I will be forever grateful. The Head of the Dept loaned me an irreplaceable classic, which my pet proceeded to chew the corner off of. When I presented the evidence to him, his only comment "I hope you digested as much of the book as the dog".

Marvin, it is stuff like this that makes life's memories so valuable.

Thanks for sharing this! I loved it.

Chris

Al VanHoey
01-27-2011, 03:56 PM
I just came to really change my opinion on pits in the last year, so these sorts of comments catch my eye.

Me too! I have a pit that I rescued about a year and a half ago. He gets along great with my other dogs and has even been known to snuggle with my daughter's cat. I have never seen any sign of aggression towards other animals or people (no matter what the age). He is one of the most affectionate dogs that I have ever been around. I would never seek out a pit puppy, but I would definitely give an adult pit a fair shake. The few pits that I have been around have been wonderful pets!

charly_t
01-27-2011, 07:00 PM
The dogs that I have seen who were "mean" that I had personal experience with were Pointers, Chows and German Shepherds. And one Hound Shepherd mix. I have never had any experience with Pits. My thoughts are that some of the bad things are inherited but some are more the owner's fault. I think that is true of most breeds. As I have said before we raised and bred Chihuahuas for 20 plus years and what I have just said holds true for that breed. We tried to pick our breeding stock always from mild mannered chihuahuas. Puppy buyers have a lot to do with how a dog turns out. We have had people show up out of the blue with their grown chihuahua that they had bought from another breeder. They wanted us to tell them what was wrong with their adult chihuahua who would bite even the owner and their own family. Most were spoiled rotten but some just inherited a lot of bad traits. Some of course were both. I must confess that we did sell one chi who grew up to bite the man of the house when he attempted to spank one of the children in the family. Now, I have to brag on the few pointers that we owned........never had one who bit anyone.

Marvin S
01-27-2011, 10:37 PM
Marvin, it is stuff like this that makes life's memories so valuable. Chris

Isn't that the truth? This was SD's premier Engineering school. 400 students started the year, 200 survived. Of our original 200 beanie wearers only 50 were in school the 3rd year. I went to a country school in SD, both of my classmates also became Engineers, one of which was a PHD in Geological Engineering. They were also better students than I, as witnessed by their GP.

But it is life's memories that mean a lot. I took my wife with me to our 55th HS reunion, all 12 of us were still alive at the time. Our little school had 75 students my senior year, & I was the guy who made sure there was no bullying, played a little sports & generally bedeviled the teachers. Also didn't date any of the locals, which kept the pressure off. As my wife said "It's like a family reunion, no cliques, no phoniness, & everyone is genuinely friendly". She had gone to a 2K size HS with 600 in her graduating class. Still miss the genuineness of the people back there, just hard to make ends meet in that environment.

depittydawg
01-28-2011, 01:21 AM
There's nothing wrong with pit bulls as a breed. There are just bad owners and bad breeders.

While what this woman did is totally wrong, and I hope she is punished to the full extent of the law, Pitbulls are an extremely dangerous breed of dog.
Last summer a friend of mine was on his bike with his Lab in tow on leash. As they approached the neighborhood park, his lab was attacked by 3 pitbulls who had escaped their yard on the corner house next to the park. Randy, being a pretty big guy was able to fight off the three pitbulls before his dog was killed. The Pit's did do several hundred dollars and many stitches of damage to the lab, and no doubt would have killed him if left alone.
What is wrong with the Pti Bull breed is that they have been bred to kill. And it has been proven so many times it's not even worth repeating anymore. Is it the dog's fault? Of course not. These dogs were bred to kill. And they are good at it. Just as just about any lab is capable of retrieving a thrown object, I'm afraid most Pitbulls retain the instinct to kill. There is a place in this world for Pit Bulls. I've heard they are good on Boar and Bear. But really, a family pet and guardian is no place for a Pit Bull.

dnf777
01-28-2011, 06:04 AM
While what this woman did is totally wrong, and I hope she is punished to the full extent of the law, Pitbulls are an extremely dangerous breed of dog.
Last summer a friend of mine was on his bike with his Lab in tow on leash. As they approached the neighborhood park, his lab was attacked by 3 pitbulls who had escaped their yard on the corner house next to the park. Randy, being a pretty big guy was able to fight off the three pitbulls before his dog was killed. The Pit's did do several hundred dollars and many stitches of damage to the lab, and no doubt would have killed him if left alone.
What is wrong with the Pti Bull breed is that they have been bred to kill. And it has been proven so many times it's not even worth repeating anymore. Is it the dog's fault? Of course not. These dogs were bred to kill. And they are good at it. Just as just about any lab is capable of retrieving a thrown object, I'm afraid most Pitbulls retain the instinct to kill. There is a place in this world for Pit Bulls. I've heard they are good on Boar and Bear. But really, a family pet and guardian is no place for a Pit Bull.

Well said.
I compare breaking to attacking.
Both situations a dog has been trained and conditioned to refrain from exercising their instincts. We all have seen even the best labs break on the line. When a pit-bull "breaks".....well, we hear about it on the news.

Blackstone
01-28-2011, 09:45 AM
I don't think it is quite that black and white. You may find this study interesting:

http://www.dogbitelaw.com/Dog%20Attacks%201982%20to%202006%20Clifton.pdf

Although there are certainly very nice pit bulls that are very calm, the data does show that there are inherent problems with the breed. Certainly bad owners and bad breeders add to the problem, but if you look at the facts the number of serious dog attacks causing death or permanent disfigurement are overwhelmingly in the camp of pit bulls, rottweilers, and presa canarios, and of the three pit bulls are responsible for another disproportionate share. These breeds are able to cause much more harm. If a collie, poodle, or other breed has a bad moment they snap and bite, but don't maul. The potential damage from a pit bull is off the scale. And when you take the population of the breed into account - something less than 1% of all dogs, the numbers scream even louder.

Again, there are bad breeders and owners, but looking at the numbers it is difficult to argue that all these very serious attacks are the result of the owner/breeder. In fact, the author found that in 2/3 of the cases, the death or disfigurement of the human was the first time the dog ever showed an aggressive attitude, so it is not just dogs bred to be mean or to fight.

The "its the owners, not the breed" mentality is shared by many, but it is only fueled by emotion, there are no facts to back it up whereas the facts in the link tell a pretty convincing story. I know several pit bulls and I really like the dogs, but as I told my sister in law, with grandchildren around, why on earth would you take this risk based on the data? Children poke and grab ears and pull tail, its what kids do, and that is a bad combination with certain breeds.

You are correct. Nothing is black and white. However, that does not mean there are “inherent problems with the breed.” Even the article you cite does not take several factors into consideration, like where the majority of these dogs came from, how they were bred, and how they were raised.

Good breeders breed for temperament as well as ability. From what I have seen, the vast majority of pit bulls are inner-city type dogs either bred to fight or from fighting stock. A large number of the people that own them are looking for a “tough” dog for protection or for a dog that will give them a tough image. Most of these people are not going to a reputable breeder to buy a well bred dog. They get them from some backyard breeder that has no breeding plan or any idea how to breed. Or, they get the pup from someone that is breeding dogs to fight, has more puppies than they can sell, and gives some of them away just to get rid of them. These breeders are not breeding with the dog’s temperament in mind. These dogs may have been bred from pit bull stock, but they are eccentrically mutts.

Also, every breed is not suitable for everyone. You have to understand the characteristics of the breed you own. I used to own and breed Chow Chows. I love them. I would have to say they are my favorite breed. However, it is not a breed I would recommend to everyone. Even though you don’t see that many of them, they are always high on the dog biting list. Yet, mine never bit me or anyone else. That is because I understood the breed and understood the personalities my dogs. I knew they had to be socialized much better than most breeds. I understood the triggers that could cause them to feel the need to bite, and kept them out of those situations. That is all part of being a responsible owner. That being said, I would trust a child around a well bred pit bull before I would trust it around a well bred Chow Chow.

I find it interesting that the argument against pit bulls is very similar the rationale used against hand guns by the anti-gun crowd. They say hand guns are dangerous, and should be banned. They are dangerous when in the hands of criminals, those that don’t understand how to safely handle them, those that don’t respect them, and of course, the terminally stupid. But, what is our first response to those critics, “It’s not the gun. It’s the person with the gun.” The same is true for pit bulls and some other dog breeds. Not everyone should own one.

Blackstone
01-28-2011, 09:47 AM
You can train a beagle to retrieve and it can do a good job...but one day, a rabbit is going to run past it and instincts are going to take over...

What are pit bulls instincts telling it to do?

It's not telling them to attack and kill people. That is not what the breed was bred to do.

Blackstone
01-28-2011, 09:56 AM
Having owned & helped my wife run a large boarding kennel for 20 years I have reached this fact filled conclusion: There are few bad dogs but there are many owners that should be locked up!!!!!!!!

Pits are not a big problem , but all to often are owned by some one not playing with a full deck. At the kennel our biggest issue was with the Rottweiler owners, some pathetically poorly cared for & ill mannered dogs. Most were told to make other arrangements for their next outing, we did not want to deal with their issues. You could recognize the dogs that would be an issue as soon as the owner stepped out of their vehicle :o.

But a long time OB trainer told me, watch the Samoyeds, Chows, & Saints, they'll take you without a show of emotion.

With the resources today anyone who abuses any animal deserves prosecution to the full extent of the law. Unfortunately for the taxpayers, but for many of them, jail is a better set of living conditions than they ever created for themselves. Possibly the best punishment would be for those who abuse dogs to receive the same treatment themselves!!!!

When I was in college & as it was small we got a lot of attention, the English Department took it upon themselves to get me to upgrade the quality of books I read, for which I will be forever grateful. The Head of the Dept loaned me an irreplaceable classic, which my pet proceeded to chew the corner off of. When I presented the evidence to him, his only comment "I hope you digested as much of the book as the dog".

Marvin,

I agree. It is usually the owner. Of course, there are always going to be some dogs that are mentally unstable, but those are the exception rather than the rule.

I do have to disagree with your trainer friend. Like I said, I used to own and raise Chows. They are a very quiet, stoic breed. However, there are always signs when they are agitated over a situation, and likely to bite. You just have to know what you are looking for and be able to recognize them when they present themselves. I have to assume Samoyeds & Saints are similar.

luvmylabs23139
01-28-2011, 11:56 AM
However, there are always signs when they are agitated over a situation, and likely to bite. You just have to know what you are looking for and be able to recognize them when they present themselves.

No matter what breed you are talking about anyone that knows how to read dogs should be able to recognize the warnings.
Unfortunately most people do not know how to read a dog and base their actions toward a dog strictly based upon the dog's breed.
As a member of a really old AKC ob club I teach a class that while not beginner level tends to be full of JQ public rather than club members.
If a person has their dog in my level (3rd one not counting puppy) they are making a decent attempt to train their dog.
The biggest issues I see are:
1. Spoiled little dogs.
2. Owners that are nervous because their dog has warned another off, most likely justified and the owner is nervous and that stresses the dog.
3. Owners that think they can show up once a week to class and have a great well mannered dog.

Besides just "bad" owners there are also alot of owners that while they have good intentions they will not see nor admit their dog's issues or shortcomings. Huge issue with small dog owners. Just ask my old lady Shadow who got charged by a Terrorist small dog the other day at the club from the other ring.

road kill
01-28-2011, 12:26 PM
I had a GR that was incredibly possesive.
Dude bit me once when I pulled a rooster out of his mouth.

Those GR's are mean dogs!!!:evil:



Just saiyn'...........


RK

Jason Glavich
01-28-2011, 12:36 PM
I used to have a pamphlet that was picked up in a packet somewhere call "All dogs bite...Because they don't have hands" It had alot of good info about dog behavior and the signs of a dog about to bite and also explaining that dogs bite for more reasons then anger. I have worked with some pits, I do not mind them, I have been chased by a few as well. But I do not wanna say the whole breed is bad, I have been bit by several dogs never once by a pit though. Mine are min pin, collie, GR, and a little fluffy dog.

luvmylabs23139
01-28-2011, 12:50 PM
I'll take the majority of Pits over the majority of Toys anyday. I've been bitten twice in my life. The biters were a Sheltie and a taco bell dog (can't spell that one) Both bites were without warning and with no threat to the dog.

charly_t
01-28-2011, 01:15 PM
I'll take the majority of Pits over the majority of Toys anyday. I've been bitten twice in my life. The biters were a Sheltie and a taco bell dog (can't spell that one) Both bites were without warning and with no threat to the dog.

Yep, just like a nasty little chihuahua :-)

If the people who developed a breed were as careful with their foundation stock for small dogs as they have been with larger breeds we might not be
having so many problems with our toy breeds......however.......we can never control those owners who refuse to teach the dog some manners ( so to speak ). Everyone recognized that a large dog can do a lot of damage but people in general didn't admit that a small dog has the same needs as far as
picking breeding stock. Spoiled dogs are spoiled dogs makes no difference if the owner is a little old lady or a macho type guy. There are many ways to spoil a good dog. With chihuahuas, as mentioned with another breed in this thread, a person should socialize that puppy ( from day one ).

Blackstone
01-28-2011, 02:13 PM
While what this woman did is totally wrong, and I hope she is punished to the full extent of the law, Pitbulls are an extremely dangerous breed of dog.
Last summer a friend of mine was on his bike with his Lab in tow on leash. As they approached the neighborhood park, his lab was attacked by 3 pitbulls who had escaped their yard on the corner house next to the park. Randy, being a pretty big guy was able to fight off the three pitbulls before his dog was killed. The Pit's did do several hundred dollars and many stitches of damage to the lab, and no doubt would have killed him if left alone.
What is wrong with the Pti Bull breed is that they have been bred to kill. And it has been proven so many times it's not even worth repeating anymore. Is it the dog's fault? Of course not. These dogs were bred to kill. And they are good at it. Just as just about any lab is capable of retrieving a thrown object, I'm afraid most Pitbulls retain the instinct to kill. There is a place in this world for Pit Bulls. I've heard they are good on Boar and Bear. But really, a family pet and guardian is no place for a Pit Bull.

You are not correct. The Pit Bull was bred to fight and for bull baiting. That is far different than being bred to kill. A well bred Pit Bull is not normally aggressive toward people. However, many do retain the instinct to fight, and if you allow them to start fighting, they enjoy it, just like your lab enjoys hunting and retrieving. If you keep them from fighting, they don’t miss it.

They do make good guard dogs because they are extremely loyal, and they have a natural protective instinct.

I am sorry about your friends encounter, but it could easily have happened with a pack of non-pit bulls. All it takes is for one dog in the pack to act aggressive, and a lot of times the other pack members will join in.

Blackstone
01-28-2011, 02:19 PM
No matter what breed you are talking about anyone that knows how to read dogs should be able to recognize the warnings.
Unfortunately most people do not know how to read a dog and base their actions toward a dog strictly based upon the dog's breed.
As a member of a really old AKC ob club I teach a class that while not beginner level tends to be full of JQ public rather than club members.
If a person has their dog in my level (3rd one not counting puppy) they are making a decent attempt to train their dog.
The biggest issues I see are:
1. Spoiled little dogs.
2. Owners that are nervous because their dog has warned another off, most likely justified and the owner is nervous and that stresses the dog.
3. Owners that think they can show up once a week to class and have a great well mannered dog.

Besides just "bad" owners there are also alot of owners that while they have good intentions they will not see nor admit their dog's issues or shortcomings. Huge issue with small dog owners. Just ask my old lady Shadow who got charged by a Terrorist small dog the other day at the club from the other ring.

I owned one Chow that rarely barked or growled, but I could tell by his posture and the look on his face when he was ready to bite. His body would stiffen and he seemed to stand taller. He would also have a very intense look in his eyes. That posture was usually directed toward strangers he didn't trust.

road kill
01-28-2011, 02:21 PM
I owned one Chow that rarely barked or growled, but I could tell by his posture and the look on his face when he was ready to bite. His body would stiffen and he seemed to stand taller. He would also have a very intense look in his eyes. That posture was usually directed toward strangers he didn't trust.

WHAT??:shock:


RK

Blackstone
01-28-2011, 02:31 PM
WHAT??:shock:


RK

What can I say, I love that breed. They have a very regal attitude, and are somewhat aloof. I really believe they think they're better than most people are. :p They are also one of the cleanest dogs you will ever own. If I didn't have birddogs, I would have one now. Although, it is hard to find a good one now. The show breeders have really messed them up. They have made the too small and stubby looking. They're no longer athletic. They're more like bull dogs with an Afro now.

Rob Paye
01-28-2011, 03:42 PM
I had a GR that was incredibly possesive.
Dude bit me once when I pulled a rooster out of his mouth.

Those GR's are mean dogs!!!:evil:



Just saiyn'...........


RK

You should just be happy he picked it up !!! I'm sorry, but I couldn't help myself.

paul young
01-28-2011, 04:08 PM
the scariest dog i ever saw was an Akita. he was in a really well fenced area, thankfully. i'm sure he gladly would have torn my throat out given a chance.-Paul

Marvin S
01-28-2011, 05:32 PM
the scariest dog i ever saw was an Akita. he was in a really well fenced area, thankfully. i'm sure he gladly would have torn my throat out given a chance.-Paul

Had we kept the kennel (located on a main thorofare) we had decided on an Akita to be our house dog. We had several in the kennel & they were regal dogs. One Japanese product I would have bought!