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Eric Johnson
02-22-2011, 11:08 AM
http://cnsnews.com/news/article/two-thirds-wisconsin-public-school-8th-g

http://tinyurl.com/4qoq7wd

Two-Thirds of Wisconsin Public-School 8th Graders Can’t Read Proficiently—Despite Highest Per Pupil Spending in Midwest

Tuesday, February 22, 2011
By Terence P. Jeffrey

(CNSNews.com) - Two-thirds of the eighth graders in Wisconsin public schools cannot read proficiently according to the U.S. Department of Education, despite the fact that Wisconsin spends more per pupil in its public schools than any other state in the Midwest.

In the National Assessment of Educational Progress tests administered by the U.S. Department of Education in 2009—the latest year available—only 32 percent of Wisconsin public-school eighth graders earned a “proficient” rating while another 2 percent earned an “advanced” rating. The other 66 percent of Wisconsin public-school eighth graders earned ratings below “proficient,” including 44 percent who earned a rating of “basic” and 22 percent who earned a rating of “below basic.”

-more-

road kill
02-22-2011, 11:12 AM
http://cnsnews.com/news/article/two-thirds-wisconsin-public-school-8th-g

http://tinyurl.com/4qoq7wd

Two-Thirds of Wisconsin Public-School 8th Graders Can’t Read Proficiently—Despite Highest Per Pupil Spending in Midwest

Tuesday, February 22, 2011
By Terence P. Jeffrey

(CNSNews.com) - Two-thirds of the eighth graders in Wisconsin public schools cannot read proficiently according to the U.S. Department of Education, despite the fact that Wisconsin spends more per pupil in its public schools than any other state in the Midwest.

In the National Assessment of Educational Progress tests administered by the U.S. Department of Education in 2009—the latest year available—only 32 percent of Wisconsin public-school eighth graders earned a “proficient” rating while another 2 percent earned an “advanced” rating. The other 66 percent of Wisconsin public-school eighth graders earned ratings below “proficient,” including 44 percent who earned a rating of “basic” and 22 percent who earned a rating of “below basic.”

-more-


Yeah, but..........


I was trying to post some of these things, but pulled out of the argument.
There are things going on here now that are just off the charts.
Not the least of which is threats of violence.
Supposedly, teachers went back to work, yet there are still 20,000 people protesting.
Who are they?
Where are they from?


RK

sandyg
02-22-2011, 12:24 PM
Yeah, but..........


I was trying to post some of these things, but pulled out of the argument.
There are things going on here now that are just off the charts.
Not the least of which is threats of violence.
Supposedly, teachers went back to work, yet there are still 20,000 people protesting.
Who are they?
Where are they from?


RK

SEIU thugs? ACORN thugs?

road kill
02-22-2011, 12:25 PM
SEIU thugs? ACORN thugs?

They all have pizza though.
Just wonder if that is a union pizza shop????



RK

Matt Weberpal
02-22-2011, 01:44 PM
http://cnsnews.com/news/article/two-thirds-wisconsin-public-school-8th-g

http://tinyurl.com/4qoq7wd

Two-Thirds of Wisconsin Public-School 8th Graders Can’t Read Proficiently—Despite Highest Per Pupil Spending in Midwest

Tuesday, February 22, 2011
By Terence P. Jeffrey

(CNSNews.com) - Two-thirds of the eighth graders in Wisconsin public schools cannot read proficiently according to the U.S. Department of Education, despite the fact that Wisconsin spends more per pupil in its public schools than any other state in the Midwest.

In the National Assessment of Educational Progress tests administered by the U.S. Department of Education in 2009—the latest year available—only 32 percent of Wisconsin public-school eighth graders earned a “proficient” rating while another 2 percent earned an “advanced” rating. The other 66 percent of Wisconsin public-school eighth graders earned ratings below “proficient,” including 44 percent who earned a rating of “basic” and 22 percent who earned a rating of “below basic.”

-more-

Are you sure? Are you sure you're sure?
Timely release of that article.
My sources tell a different story.
Grade 8,
# of students 61,796, min. perf. 5.5% ,basic 10.0% ,proficient 43.6% ,advanced 40.4%

http://data.dpi.state.wi.us/data/StateTestsPerformance.aspx?GraphFile=GEDISA&S4orALL=1&SRegion=1&SCounty=47&SAthleticConf=45&SCESA=05&FULLKEY=09014003````&OrgLevel=st&DN=Antigo&Qquad=performance.aspx

Buzz
02-22-2011, 02:37 PM
More selective BS from the right wingers. Here is the national report on test scores. Every state is summarized on pages 33 & 34.

I see nothing there that would indicate that Wisconsin should be singled out for criticism, except that there is a effort in progress there to bust the unions.


Look for yourself...


http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/pdf/main2009/2010458.pdf

Weberpal78, I think the results you're linking is from a different test, is that a state test?

And I still say, poor reading proficiency is a parent problem more than a school system problem. I wonder how many parents out there shut down the computers and TV machines and have "reading time." No kid becomes proficient or advanced reading only what is assigned at school.

ducknwork
02-22-2011, 03:18 PM
And I still say, poor reading proficiency is a parent problem more than a school system problem. I wonder how many parents out there shut down the computers and TV machines and have "reading time." No kid becomes proficient or advanced reading only what is assigned at school.

So if teachers don't actually make a difference in the proficiency of reading, writing and 'rithmetic, then how is what Walker is trying to do going to keep kids from learning? Does the bill take away kids' parents, too?:confused: And if teachers aren't really the ones that make kids proficient, then why should they be compensated so well? If I am not doing my job well, I risk losing pay/benefits....

Buzz
02-22-2011, 03:21 PM
So if teachers don't actually make a difference in the proficiency of reading, writing and 'rithmetic, then how is what Walker is trying to do going to keep kids from learning? Does the bill take away kids' parents, too?:confused: And if teachers aren't really the ones that make kids proficient, then why should they be compensated so well? If I am not doing my job well, I risk losing pay/benefits....

What was I thinking?

You're right, parents are absolutely off the hook when it comes to their kid's development. Just make sure they get up in the morning and off to school and ya got it dk'd.

You should look at the link I provided. Nationwide, 2% of kids are advanced, 28% are proficient. That's 30% proficient or above. If you look at what I said, I said proficient or advanced. I'm betting that those 30% are reading outside of school, the other 70% not so much.

ducknwork
02-22-2011, 03:24 PM
What was I thinking?

You're right, parents are absolutely off the hook when it comes to their kid's development. Just make sure they get up in the morning and off to school and ya got it dk'd.

Where did I say that parents have no responsibility regarding how well their children learn/develop?

Buzz
02-22-2011, 03:27 PM
Never mind...

ducknwork
02-22-2011, 03:31 PM
Buzz,
I see your edit and I agree 100%. Parents are definitely more important to a child's learning than teachers are. My point is that if teachers don't actually make kids more successful, it would seem that they have less of a leg to stand on when they are begging for more compensation. So how is this bill going to hurt kids? Other than teachers missing all these days of course...

BTW, you brag on your daughter's reading ability sometimes and rightfully so, but now it's my turn...:D My daughter (who turned 4 on Sunday) has been sounding out words and reading simple words for probably 6 months. She also writes well. She handed everyone at her party a hand written thank you note for the presents she received before they walked out the door, and it was legible. No preschool, no teachers. She stays home with my wife. Granted, some of it is natural intelligence, but my wife has a lot to do with it also. I think we are going to have discipline problems in kindergarten because she is going to be bored and she is already a prankster around the house.

Buzz
02-22-2011, 05:11 PM
Buzz,
I see your edit and I agree 100%. Parents are definitely more important to a child's learning than teachers are. My point is that if teachers don't actually make kids more successful, it would seem that they have less of a leg to stand on when they are begging for more compensation. So how is this bill going to hurt kids? Other than teachers missing all these days of course...

BTW, you brag on your daughter's reading ability sometimes and rightfully so, but now it's my turn...:D My daughter (who turned 4 on Sunday) has been sounding out words and reading simple words for probably 6 months. She also writes well. She handed everyone at her party a hand written thank you note for the presents she received before they walked out the door, and it was legible. No preschool, no teachers. She stays home with my wife. Granted, some of it is natural intelligence, but my wife has a lot to do with it also. I think we are going to have discipline problems in kindergarten because she is going to be bored and she is already a prankster around the house.


Glad to hear about your daughter! I can't take any credit for mine. When she was born my wife said she wasn't going back to work because you only get to raise them once. ;-) I think it starts with getting them to love hearing a good story by reading to them when they are young. Liz struggled a little at first, but I think her desire to get access to all those great stories helped get her over the hump. I bet your daughter is going to love kindergarten, after she gets over being separated from your wife.

We did send Liz to pre-school, but it was more to do with wanting to socialize her with other kids than education - she's an only child.

Buzz
02-22-2011, 05:17 PM
Eric,

Just wanted to get your input on what the heck is going on down there in Alabama. I see they are spending almost $1600 less per student than Wisconsin is, but 11% fewer of the kids in Alabama are proficient in reading than in Wisconsin. I couldn't help but notice also that Alabama gets a little more in federal money per student, and that federal dollars account for 9.7% of the per student spending there as opposed to 6.7% in Wisconsin.

Maybe if Wisconsin folks could keep their dollars in Wisconsin instead of shipping them down south, they would have fewer budget woes.

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5299/5468488605_848f6a4e08.jpg

dnf777
02-22-2011, 05:25 PM
http://cnsnews.com/news/article/two-thirds-wisconsin-public-school-8th-g

http://tinyurl.com/4qoq7wd

Two-Thirds of Wisconsin Public-School 8th Graders Can’t Read Proficiently—Despite Highest Per Pupil Spending in Midwest

Tuesday, February 22, 2011
By Terence P. Jeffrey

(CNSNews.com) - Two-thirds of the eighth graders in Wisconsin public schools cannot read proficiently according to the U.S. Department of Education, despite the fact that Wisconsin spends more per pupil in its public schools than any other state in the Midwest.

In the National Assessment of Educational Progress tests administered by the U.S. Department of Education in 2009—the latest year available—only 32 percent of Wisconsin public-school eighth graders earned a “proficient” rating while another 2 percent earned an “advanced” rating. The other 66 percent of Wisconsin public-school eighth graders earned ratings below “proficient,” including 44 percent who earned a rating of “basic” and 22 percent who earned a rating of “below basic.”

-more-

Certainly a lot of charts to sort through if you follow to the prime source. In skimming through about 15 fine-line charts, I notice that Wisconsin students consistently scored above the national averages reported by the agency. The only group that fell slightly below national averages, was Asian/Pacific Islander students.

huntinman
02-22-2011, 06:18 PM
Eric,

Just wanted to get your input on what the heck is going on down there in Alabama. I see they are spending almost $1600 less per student than Wisconsin is, but 11% fewer of the kids in Alabama are proficient in reading than in Wisconsin. I couldn't help but notice also that Alabama gets a little more in federal money per student, and that federal dollars account for 9.7% of the per student spending there as opposed to 6.7% in Wisconsin.

Maybe if Wisconsin folks could keep their dollars in Wisconsin instead of shipping them down south, they would have fewer budget woes.

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5299/5468488605_848f6a4e08.jpg

It's called deomographics Buzz

Eric Johnson
02-22-2011, 06:24 PM
Buzz-

I can't give any good excuse except that a huge proportion of Alabama, read "most anyone who can afford it", sends their kids to private schools. These wouldn't be part of your table. However, I can't give you specific numbers.

For instance, Montgomery has 3 private schools (K-12). At the high school level these 3 represent about 50% of the 4 public high school students. However, in the public school system there is a parallel system called "magnet" schools. These are the cream of the students in public school. The magnet high school is rated in the top ten high schools in the country. It's called LAMP... Lanier Accelerated Magnet Program. Kids there are often taking 2nd year college level courses.

Down the I-65 corridor, Huntsville, Birmingham, Montgomery, and Mobile all have similar cases. These are the population centers. In other parts of the state the school systems are strapped for cash because of woefully low property values. It's really a sad state of affiars.
Eric