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huntinman
04-28-2011, 12:16 PM
We are in three wars and have troops spread all over the world and all Obama can think of is cutting their funds. Reminds me of Carter.

Push for Pentagon cuts tops Panetta's agenda

By DONNA CASSATA
Associated Press



WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Barack Obama's choice of expert budget-cutter Leon Panetta to lead the Defense Department is a clear signal that the White House perceives the nation's deficit crisis, not the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, as its toughest challenge.

After winning the presidency in November 2008, Obama asked Robert Gates to remain defense secretary as the administration struggled to bring clarity to the fog of two wars. In tapping Panetta to replace Gates, Obama is turning to a Washington insider and veteran of budget fights as the administration wrestles with reining in an estimated $1.6 trillion deficit.

A military budget that has doubled since the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks faces certain cuts amid the clamor from fiscal-minded lawmakers, emboldened tea partyers and an electorate insistent on Washington changing its spending habits. The prospect of the United States drawing down the number of troops in Iraq and Afghanistan pumps up the volume in the call for cuts.

Congress and the White House have moved to trim defense spending with the budget for the current fiscal year set at $513 billion, $18.1 billion less than the administration proposed.

In outlining his deficit-reduction plan, Obama called for slashing another $400 billion from defense over the next 12 years. The president's bipartisan fiscal commission recommended Pentagon cuts of $1 trillion over a decade.

Enter Panetta, an eight-term congressman, former chairman of the House Budget Committee, one-time head of the Office of Management and Budget, White House chief of staff for President Bill Clinton and current CIA director.

"People are looking at the military budget in much sterner terms," said former Rep. Bill Frenzel, R-Minn., who worked closely with Panetta on the Budget Committee. "They're digging deeper than the president to settle the fiscal crisis. Defense has to give more. ... This will make Leon's job extremely difficult and very sensitive."

If confirmed by the Senate, the 72-year-old Panetta will face a chockablock agenda - Pentagon spending, two wars and the ongoing U.S. military operation in Libya, certification that the military is ready to deal with openly gay members in its ranks, and the selection of a new chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Gates told senior staff that he had recommended Panetta to Obama six months ago. A senior administration official, speaking on condition of anonymity in advance of the formal White House announcement, said Panetta was initially reluctant to leave the CIA for the Pentagon but eventually relented and decided he couldn't refuse the president.

"His approach to problems is very pragmatic," said former Rep. Lee Hamilton, D-Ind., who served with Panetta in the House and worked with him on the Iraq Study Group in 2006. "He's not hung up on ego or ideology. He doesn't die on his sword if others disagree with him."

Widely respected by Republicans and Democrats, Panetta is described by former colleagues as open and fair, willing to make concessions, and experienced in resolving disputes. He was a major player in the 1990 budget talks.

Panetta is the consummate multitasker, picked by Clinton to oversee OMB after his four years as Budget chairman, then asked to bring order to a Clinton White House as chief of staff. His experience with Hillary Rodham Clinton when she was first lady will serve him well as he works closely with the secretary of state.

Panetta is a Republican-turned-Democrat who once worked in the Nixon administration, quitting amid dissent over the president's civil rights policies. The Monterey-born, piano-playing Panetta often felt the pull of the California peninsula and the walnut farm in the Carmel Valley once owned by his father. When he served in the House, he returned home every weekend, often riding a tractor under cloudless skies.

He and his wife, Sylvia, established the Panetta Institute for Public Policy in Monterey in 1997.

Obama selected him for CIA director, an appointment that prompted some grumbling in Congress and national security circles that he lacked the background and experience. But Panetta has received good marks, and his constant presence in National Security Council meetings should ease the transition for a defense secretary dealing with Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya.

The budget is a near-term issue as the congressional committees overseeing the Pentagon begin crafting a blueprint in May. In his last budget request, Gates sought $553 billion for the budget year that begins Oct. 1, plus $118 billion in war costs. The Pentagon is certain to face congressional efforts to cut spending.

"We're in a build-down. The game is over. This is all downside," said Gordon Adams, who worked with Panetta at OMB.

As OMB chief, Panetta calculated how much money each agency and department would get. Todd Harrison of the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessment sees him as a potential advocate for the Pentagon.

"I think having him on the DOD side of the budget battle now will be a real asset to DOD. He knows how OMB works, knows the inner workings of the budget process at the White House. So I think he will be better equipped to negotiate DOD's top line budget than any of the other candidates" who were considered, Harrison said.

Harrison said it is "kind of an unknown" what Panetta's views are on some of the major budget decisions that he'll face at the Pentagon. "It remains to be seen how he's going to favor people, force structure, modernization" or weapons programs, Harrison said of Panetta, who served as a first lieutenant in the Army from 1964-66.

---

Associated Press writers Anne Gearan and Pauline Jelinek contributed to this report.

Roger Perry
04-28-2011, 12:29 PM
We are in three wars and have troops spread all over the world and all Obama can think of is cutting their funds. Reminds me of Carter.

Push for Pentagon cuts tops Panetta's agenda

By DONNA CASSATA
Associated Press



WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Barack Obama's choice of expert budget-cutter Leon Panetta to lead the Defense Department is a clear signal that the White House perceives the nation's deficit crisis, not the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, as its toughest challenge.

After winning the presidency in November 2008, Obama asked Robert Gates to remain defense secretary as the administration struggled to bring clarity to the fog of two wars. In tapping Panetta to replace Gates, Obama is turning to a Washington insider and veteran of budget fights as the administration wrestles with reining in an estimated $1.6 trillion deficit.

A military budget that has doubled since the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks faces certain cuts amid the clamor from fiscal-minded lawmakers, emboldened tea partyers and an electorate insistent on Washington changing its spending habits. The prospect of the United States drawing down the number of troops in Iraq and Afghanistan pumps up the volume in the call for cuts.

Congress and the White House have moved to trim defense spending with the budget for the current fiscal year set at $513 billion, $18.1 billion less than the administration proposed.

In outlining his deficit-reduction plan, Obama called for slashing another $400 billion from defense over the next 12 years. The president's bipartisan fiscal commission recommended Pentagon cuts of $1 trillion over a decade.

Enter Panetta, an eight-term congressman, former chairman of the House Budget Committee, one-time head of the Office of Management and Budget, White House chief of staff for President Bill Clinton and current CIA director.

"People are looking at the military budget in much sterner terms," said former Rep. Bill Frenzel, R-Minn., who worked closely with Panetta on the Budget Committee. "They're digging deeper than the president to settle the fiscal crisis. Defense has to give more. ... This will make Leon's job extremely difficult and very sensitive."

If confirmed by the Senate, the 72-year-old Panetta will face a chockablock agenda - Pentagon spending, two wars and the ongoing U.S. military operation in Libya, certification that the military is ready to deal with openly gay members in its ranks, and the selection of a new chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Gates told senior staff that he had recommended Panetta to Obama six months ago. A senior administration official, speaking on condition of anonymity in advance of the formal White House announcement, said Panetta was initially reluctant to leave the CIA for the Pentagon but eventually relented and decided he couldn't refuse the president.

"His approach to problems is very pragmatic," said former Rep. Lee Hamilton, D-Ind., who served with Panetta in the House and worked with him on the Iraq Study Group in 2006. "He's not hung up on ego or ideology. He doesn't die on his sword if others disagree with him."

Widely respected by Republicans and Democrats, Panetta is described by former colleagues as open and fair, willing to make concessions, and experienced in resolving disputes. He was a major player in the 1990 budget talks.

Panetta is the consummate multitasker, picked by Clinton to oversee OMB after his four years as Budget chairman, then asked to bring order to a Clinton White House as chief of staff. His experience with Hillary Rodham Clinton when she was first lady will serve him well as he works closely with the secretary of state.

Panetta is a Republican-turned-Democrat who once worked in the Nixon administration, quitting amid dissent over the president's civil rights policies. The Monterey-born, piano-playing Panetta often felt the pull of the California peninsula and the walnut farm in the Carmel Valley once owned by his father. When he served in the House, he returned home every weekend, often riding a tractor under cloudless skies.

He and his wife, Sylvia, established the Panetta Institute for Public Policy in Monterey in 1997.

Obama selected him for CIA director, an appointment that prompted some grumbling in Congress and national security circles that he lacked the background and experience. But Panetta has received good marks, and his constant presence in National Security Council meetings should ease the transition for a defense secretary dealing with Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya.

The budget is a near-term issue as the congressional committees overseeing the Pentagon begin crafting a blueprint in May. In his last budget request, Gates sought $553 billion for the budget year that begins Oct. 1, plus $118 billion in war costs. The Pentagon is certain to face congressional efforts to cut spending.

"We're in a build-down. The game is over. This is all downside," said Gordon Adams, who worked with Panetta at OMB.

As OMB chief, Panetta calculated how much money each agency and department would get. Todd Harrison of the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessment sees him as a potential advocate for the Pentagon.

"I think having him on the DOD side of the budget battle now will be a real asset to DOD. He knows how OMB works, knows the inner workings of the budget process at the White House. So I think he will be better equipped to negotiate DOD's top line budget than any of the other candidates" who were considered, Harrison said.

Harrison said it is "kind of an unknown" what Panetta's views are on some of the major budget decisions that he'll face at the Pentagon. "It remains to be seen how he's going to favor people, force structure, modernization" or weapons programs, Harrison said of Panetta, who served as a first lieutenant in the Army from 1964-66.

---

Associated Press writers Anne Gearan and Pauline Jelinek contributed to this report.

You and the other righties here are b!tch!ng about the Deficit. Military spending has doubled since 09/11/2001 and needs to be reigned in as defence is one of the major spending factors. Ady you are claiming 3 wars--- how about 2 wars that your genius started and did not get us out of before he left office and one military operation.;-)

troy schwab
04-28-2011, 12:57 PM
We are in three wars and have troops spread all over the world and all Obama can think of is cutting their funds. Reminds me of Carter.

Push for Pentagon cuts tops Panetta's agenda

By DONNA CASSATA
Associated Press



WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Barack Obama's choice of expert budget-cutter Leon Panetta to lead the Defense Department is a clear signal that the White House perceives the nation's deficit crisis, not the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, as its toughest challenge.

After winning the presidency in November 2008, Obama asked Robert Gates to remain defense secretary as the administration struggled to bring clarity to the fog of two wars. In tapping Panetta to replace Gates, Obama is turning to a Washington insider and veteran of budget fights as the administration wrestles with reining in an estimated $1.6 trillion deficit.

A military budget that has doubled since the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks faces certain cuts amid the clamor from fiscal-minded lawmakers, emboldened tea partyers and an electorate insistent on Washington changing its spending habits. The prospect of the United States drawing down the number of troops in Iraq and Afghanistan pumps up the volume in the call for cuts.

Congress and the White House have moved to trim defense spending with the budget for the current fiscal year set at $513 billion, $18.1 billion less than the administration proposed.

In outlining his deficit-reduction plan, Obama called for slashing another $400 billion from defense over the next 12 years. The president's bipartisan fiscal commission recommended Pentagon cuts of $1 trillion over a decade.

Enter Panetta, an eight-term congressman, former chairman of the House Budget Committee, one-time head of the Office of Management and Budget, White House chief of staff for President Bill Clinton and current CIA director.

"People are looking at the military budget in much sterner terms," said former Rep. Bill Frenzel, R-Minn., who worked closely with Panetta on the Budget Committee. "They're digging deeper than the president to settle the fiscal crisis. Defense has to give more. ... This will make Leon's job extremely difficult and very sensitive."

If confirmed by the Senate, the 72-year-old Panetta will face a chockablock agenda - Pentagon spending, two wars and the ongoing U.S. military operation in Libya, certification that the military is ready to deal with openly gay members in its ranks, and the selection of a new chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Gates told senior staff that he had recommended Panetta to Obama six months ago. A senior administration official, speaking on condition of anonymity in advance of the formal White House announcement, said Panetta was initially reluctant to leave the CIA for the Pentagon but eventually relented and decided he couldn't refuse the president.

"His approach to problems is very pragmatic," said former Rep. Lee Hamilton, D-Ind., who served with Panetta in the House and worked with him on the Iraq Study Group in 2006. "He's not hung up on ego or ideology. He doesn't die on his sword if others disagree with him."

Widely respected by Republicans and Democrats, Panetta is described by former colleagues as open and fair, willing to make concessions, and experienced in resolving disputes. He was a major player in the 1990 budget talks.

Panetta is the consummate multitasker, picked by Clinton to oversee OMB after his four years as Budget chairman, then asked to bring order to a Clinton White House as chief of staff. His experience with Hillary Rodham Clinton when she was first lady will serve him well as he works closely with the secretary of state.

Panetta is a Republican-turned-Democrat who once worked in the Nixon administration, quitting amid dissent over the president's civil rights policies. The Monterey-born, piano-playing Panetta often felt the pull of the California peninsula and the walnut farm in the Carmel Valley once owned by his father. When he served in the House, he returned home every weekend, often riding a tractor under cloudless skies.
He and his wife, Sylvia, established the Panetta Institute for Public Policy in Monterey in 1997.

Obama selected him for CIA director, an appointment that prompted some grumbling in Congress and national security circles that he lacked the background and experience. But Panetta has received good marks, and his constant presence in National Security Council meetings should ease the transition for a defense secretary dealing with Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya.

The budget is a near-term issue as the congressional committees overseeing the Pentagon begin crafting a blueprint in May. In his last budget request, Gates sought $553 billion for the budget year that begins Oct. 1, plus $118 billion in war costs. The Pentagon is certain to face congressional efforts to cut spending.

"We're in a build-down. The game is over. This is all downside," said Gordon Adams, who worked with Panetta at OMB.

As OMB chief, Panetta calculated how much money each agency and department would get. Todd Harrison of the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessment sees him as a potential advocate for the Pentagon.

"I think having him on the DOD side of the budget battle now will be a real asset to DOD. He knows how OMB works, knows the inner workings of the budget process at the White House. So I think he will be better equipped to negotiate DOD's top line budget than any of the other candidates" who were considered, Harrison said.

Harrison said it is "kind of an unknown" what Panetta's views are on some of the major budget decisions that he'll face at the Pentagon. "It remains to be seen how he's going to favor people, force structure, modernization" or weapons programs, Harrison said of Panetta, who served as a first lieutenant in the Army from 1964-66.

---

Associated Press writers Anne Gearan and Pauline Jelinek contributed to this report.

Im sure that didnt cost the taxpayers anything..... frivolous spending regards........

duckheads
04-28-2011, 01:19 PM
You and the other righties here are b!tch!ng about the Deficit. Military spending has doubled since 09/11/2001 and needs to be reigned in as defence is one of the major spending factors. Ady you are claiming 3 wars--- how about 2 wars that your genius started and did not get us out of before he left office and one military operation.;-)

and YOUR genius has tripled that deficit in just two years! YOUR genius has also gotten us into another war with no defined mission or plan.

At least most of us "righties" willingly admit we are conservative, unlike yourself who is so blinded by his liberal beliefs yets still claims to be an independant.

Roger Perry
04-28-2011, 02:57 PM
and YOUR genius has tripled that deficit in just two years! YOUR genius has also gotten us into another war with no defined mission or plan.

At least most of us "righties" willingly admit we are conservative, unlike yourself who is so blinded by his liberal beliefs yets still claims to be an independant.

Only Congress can declare war and we are in 2 not three. Libya is a military conflect which we have limited involvment in. Obama included the price of the 2 wars in the deficit something the last president did not do.

M&K's Retrievers
04-28-2011, 03:07 PM
Only Congress can declare war and we are in 2 not three. Libya is a military conflect which we have limited involvment in. Obama included the price of the 2 wars in the deficit something the last president did not do.

War is war whether declared or not.

road kill
04-28-2011, 03:12 PM
War is war whether declared or not.

Anyone who has ever been in a "fire fight" understands that when the bullets are flyin' semantics don't count.:cool:

People died in the Libyan "conflict."

It's as horrible as any other situation in history where people lost their lives.
I do note we have become bored with Libya and moved on to Oprah.......



RK

troy schwab
04-28-2011, 03:18 PM
Only Congress can declare war and we are in 2 not three. Libya is a military conflect which we have limited involvment in. Obama included the price of the 2 wars in the deficit something the last president did not do.

That friggin hilarious right there....... check out the numbers of american sorties, patriot missiles, and drone flights versus foreign contribution. The numbers may surprise you....... like 95% of all military action has been with american servicemen and american goods. And who do you think heads up NATO????? Do some research....... before you state something so obviously twisted.......

Roger Perry
04-28-2011, 03:47 PM
That friggin hilarious right there....... check out the numbers of american sorties, patriot missiles, and drone flights versus foreign contribution. The numbers may surprise you....... like 95% of all military action has been with american servicemen and american goods. And who do you think heads up NATO????? Do some research....... before you state something so obviously twisted.......

Actually it is the Secretary General that heads up NATO

The NATO Secretary General

http://www.nato.int/nato_static/assets/pictures/2009_08_090803a-arrivalnewsg/20090803_090803a-005_rdax_270x180.jpg
The Secretary General is the Alliance’s top international civil servant. This person is responsible for steering the process of consultation and decision-making in the Alliance and ensuring that decisions are implemented.
The Secretary General is also NATO’s chief spokesperson and the head of the Organization’s International Staff.
The post is currently held by Anders Fogh Rasmussen, former Prime Minister of Denmark, who took up his responsibilities on 1 August 2009.
The function of Secretary General is filled by a senior statesman with high-level political experience in the government of one of the member countries. The person is nominated by member governments for an initial period of four years, which can be extended by mutual consent.

Maybe you need to do some research before posting.;-)

troy schwab
04-28-2011, 03:53 PM
American Supreme Commander

Max Boot, Senior Fellow for National Security Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, also pointed out that the person in charge of the whole mission is an American, Adm. James Stavridis of the U.S. Navy.

CNN’s Lawrence said Stavridis “is the NATO Supreme Allied Commander, Europe. So even the Canadian general who is running ‘Operation Unified Protector’ ultimately reports up to the American Admiral Stavridis.”

Lines of Authority

So how does Adm. Stavridis' office explain allied vs. American command? Col. Greg Julian, Chief of Public Affairs for Allied Command Operations, told CNN that in a NATO mission there are "always at least two distinct chains of command: a national command and a multinational chain of command."

He explained foreign officers might have "operational control,” "tactical control," or support responsibilities. But American commanders retain direct control over U.S. troops. And Col. Julian said, "As Commander and Chief, the president always retains and cannot relinquish national command authority over U.S. forces."

Kimmitt broke it down further: “A foreign officer can direct U.S. forces to conduct missions and operations but doesn't take command of these units." He added that "coalition forces must follow the orders of their home countries ahead of the orders of the coalition." He also noted that "this is not unique to the U.S."




KEEP RESEARCHING ROG!!!!! A tiitle is just that...... a title.......... nothing more.

huntinman
04-28-2011, 03:58 PM
Do you guys hear some annoying sound coming out of Forida? Sounds real whiny? Not me:cool:

Losthwy
04-28-2011, 04:37 PM
Since 1945, defense spending has risen in wartime and fallen as conflicts end. Dwight Eisenhower reduced national defense outlays by 28 percent from their 1953 Korean War peak. Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford went even further, cutting 37 percent from the defense budget after the Vietnam-era high in 1968. And President George H.W. Bush had cut 14 percent compared with the 1989 Cold War budget by the time he left office.
All these presidents were Republicans. Meanwhile, after adjusting for inflation, the most expensive defense budget in more than 60 years belongs to President Obama, a Democrat.
Of course, Democrats have also found savings at the Pentagon. Clinton extended the post-Cold War drawdown through his 1998 budget, and Obama will probably start post-Iraq and Afghanistan defense cuts soon - potentially with support from new Republican House leaders such as Eric Cantor (Va.) and Paul Ryan (Wis.), who have said that defense will not be exempt from the fiscal axe.
Washington Post Jan. 2011.

Want to balance the budget, but doesn't want to cut defense spending which is a major part of the budget. Good luck with that.
Side Note- One of the growing problems confronting the military today is the rising cost of Healthcare.

huntinman
04-28-2011, 05:31 PM
Since 1945, defense spending has risen in wartime and fallen as conflicts end. Dwight Eisenhower reduced national defense outlays by 28 percent from their 1953 Korean War peak. Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford went even further, cutting 37 percent from the defense budget after the Vietnam-era high in 1968. And President George H.W. Bush had cut 14 percent compared with the 1989 Cold War budget by the time he left office.
All these presidents were Republicans. Meanwhile, after adjusting for inflation, the most expensive defense budget in more than 60 years belongs to President Obama, a Democrat.
Of course, Democrats have also found savings at the Pentagon. Clinton extended the post-Cold War drawdown through his 1998 budget, and Obama will probably start post-Iraq and Afghanistan defense cuts soon - potentially with support from new Republican House leaders such as Eric Cantor (Va.) and Paul Ryan (Wis.), who have said that defense will not be exempt from the fiscal axe.
Washington Post Jan. 2011.

Want to balance the budget, but doesn't want to cut defense spending which is a major part of the budget. Good luck with that.
Side Note- One of the growing problems confronting the military today is the rising cost of Healthcare.

Hate to remind you, but it does not appear that too many conflicts that we are involved in are actually coming to an end. And Obama does not seem to have a strategy for the new ones the he is getting us in. We can't golf our way out of the problems in the middle east. I think it going to involve weapons.

BonMallari
04-28-2011, 05:41 PM
Since 1945, defense spending has risen in wartime and fallen as conflicts end. Dwight Eisenhower reduced national defense outlays by 28 percent from their 1953 Korean War peak. Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford went even further, cutting 37 percent from the defense budget after the Vietnam-era high in 1968. And President George H.W. Bush had cut 14 percent compared with the 1989 Cold War budget by the time he left office.
All these presidents were Republicans. Meanwhile, after adjusting for inflation, the most expensive defense budget in more than 60 years belongs to President Obama, a Democrat.
Of course, Democrats have also found savings at the Pentagon. Clinton extended the post-Cold War drawdown through his 1998 budget, and Obama will probably start post-Iraq and Afghanistan defense cuts soon - potentially with support from new Republican House leaders such as Eric Cantor (Va.) and Paul Ryan (Wis.), who have said that defense will not be exempt from the fiscal axe.
Washington Post Jan. 2011.

Want to balance the budget, but doesn't want to cut defense spending which is a major part of the budget. Good luck with that.
Side Note- One of the growing problems confronting the military today is the rising cost of Healthcare.

We owe every single veteran the best healthcare that is available, there are not enough VA hospitals,it really played a factor when deciding where my folks would live out their days...

Cut the defense budget

like NASA, do we really need space exploration at this current time

quit giving foreign aid, in many cases its propping up corrupt govt's that are extorting the funds

starjack
04-28-2011, 05:53 PM
Since 1945, defense spending has risen in wartime and fallen as conflicts end. Dwight Eisenhower reduced national defense outlays by 28 percent from their 1953 Korean War peak. Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford went even further, cutting 37 percent from the defense budget after the Vietnam-era high in 1968. And President George H.W. Bush had cut 14 percent compared with the 1989 Cold War budget by the time he left office.
All these presidents were Republicans. Meanwhile, after adjusting for inflation, the most expensive defense budget in more than 60 years belongs to President Obama, a Democrat.
Of course, Democrats have also found savings at the Pentagon. Clinton extended the post-Cold War drawdown through his 1998 budget, and Obama will probably start post-Iraq and Afghanistan defense cuts soon - potentially with support from new Republican House leaders such as Eric Cantor (Va.) and Paul Ryan (Wis.), who have said that defense will not be exempt from the fiscal axe.
Washington Post Jan. 2011.

Want to balance the budget, but doesn't want to cut defense spending which is a major part of the budget. Good luck with that.
Side Note- One of the growing problems confronting the military today is the rising cost of Healthcare.

One war i feel we should be getting out but afghanistan we should wipe off the map seeing bin ladin was the driving force behind 9/11. You do remember 9/11? But to cut any healthcare funding for our servicemen would be just wrong.