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BonMallari
03-20-2012, 06:51 PM
4.9 TRILLION in debt in just 3 years in office compared to EIGHT YEARS of GWB 43...

Go ahead and reverse this for all you jr Axelrods / Jarrets spin doctors out there

JDogger
03-20-2012, 11:43 PM
4.9 TRILLION in debt in just 3 years in office compared to EIGHT YEARS of GWB 43...

Go ahead and reverse this for all you jr Axelrods / Jarrets spin doctors out there

Hi Bon,

I'm bored tonight, but I'll not explain the difference between working for tips and national debt and deficit spending.
I write off debt every 60 days or so. Does it hurt? A little, but what I care about more are my sales gains that pay in my net 30 accounts on time.
I have a huge margin. I can take loses. And still meet my margins.
Is my company an exception....not hardly.
We have grown and expanded to two continents in the past couple years.

Debt and deficit spending on the global level are not the phoria you envision.

Your guy....http://www.ontheissues.org/2004/Dick_Cheney_Budget_+_Economy.htm

What more can I say, JD

M&K's Retrievers
03-21-2012, 01:04 AM
Hi Bon,

I'm bored tonight, but I'll not explain the difference between working for tips and national debt and deficit spending.
I write off debt every 60 days or so. Does it hurt? A little, but what I care about more are my sales gains that pay in my net 30 accounts on time.
I have a huge margin. I can take loses. And still meet my margins.
Is my company an exception....not hardly.
We have grown and expanded to two continents in the past couple years.

Debt and deficit spending on the global level are not the phoria you envision.

Your guy....http://www.ontheissues.org/2004/Dick_Cheney_Budget_+_Economy.htm

What more can I say, JD

JD, what were you thinking?

Jason Glavich
03-21-2012, 07:00 AM
Hi Bon,

I'm bored tonight, but I'll not explain the difference between working for tips and national debt and deficit spending.
I write off debt every 60 days or so. Does it hurt? A little, but what I care about more are my sales gains that pay in my net 30 accounts on time.
I have a huge margin. I can take loses. And still meet my margins.
Is my company an exception....not hardly.
We have grown and expanded to two continents in the past couple years.

Debt and deficit spending on the global level are not the phoria you envision.

Your guy....http://www.ontheissues.org/2004/Dick_Cheney_Budget_+_Economy.htm

What more can I say, JD

Quoting an article about Cheney from 2004 does what in this case? Simple numbers game this time. 4.9T in three years. He said and did a lot of stupid things in the past, but then again look at Biden, even a few days ago with his BHOs plan to get OBL was the most audacious in 500 years. VP's say stupid stuff all the time. They also have a past as does Obama, although we can view cheneys past unlike Obama. Most of this articles quotes and votes are from the 90's or 80's. Just think about what BHO was doing during those same times.

At the end of the day 4.9T is still 4.9T and the economy still sucks.


Cheney to Treasury: "Deficits don't matter"
Former Treasury Secretary Paul O'Neill was told "deficits don't matter" when he warned of a looming fiscal crisis.
O'Neill, fired in a shakeup of Bush's economic team in December 2002, raised objections to a new round of tax cuts and said the president balked at his more aggressive plan to combat corporate crime after a string of accounting scandals because of opposition from "the corporate crowd," a key constituency.

O'Neill said he tried to warn Vice President Dick Cheney that growing budget deficits-expected to top $500 billion this fiscal year alone-posed a threat to the economy. Cheney cut him off. "You know, Paul, Reagan proved deficits don't matter," he said, according to excerpts. Cheney continued: "We won the midterms (congressional elections). This is our due." A month later, Cheney told the Treasury secretary he was fired.

The vice president's office had no immediate comment, but John Snow, who replaced O'Neill, insisted that deficits "do matter" to the administration.

Source: [X-ref O'Neill] Adam Entous, Reuters, on AOL News Jan 11, 2004

Tax cuts are crucial to getting recovery underway
The President's tax policy [has] put money back into the pockets of the people who earn it. We think that's been vital to avoiding an even deeper recession. We think it's been crucial, as well, to getting the recovery underway. We've been able to cut rates. We've been able to reform the double-taxation of dividends and improve the treatment of capital gains, significant expensing for small businesses. That's where all the jobs get created. Those reforms are key to long-term economic growth.
Source: Speech at Rep. Jim Gerlach luncheon, Malvern PA Oct 3, 2003

Economy moves forward when Americans have more to invest
When the American people have more to spend, more to save, more to invest, our economy moves forward. And those who need work are more likely to find a job. We expanded the child tax credit from $600 to $1,000. We reduced the marriage penalty. We cut the top rate of taxes on dividends and capital gains. Tax relief is critical to our small businesses. And for the sake of America's entrepreneurs, farmers and ranchers, we are also bringing the death tax to an end.
Source: Remarks at the National Minority Enterprise Conference Sep 30, 2003

Increase domestic energy production without damage to land
Q: What is your energy policy?
CHENEY: We are in trouble because the administration has not addressed these issues. We have the prospects of brownouts in California. We have a potential home heating oil crisis in the Northeast. We’ve got gasoline prices rising. For years, the administration has talked about reducing our dependence on foreign sources of oil, but they haven’t done it. We’ve got the lowest rate of domestic production of oil now in 46 years. Our imports are at an all-time record high. That means we’re more subject to fluctuations in price. We don’t have the refinery capacity. We haven’t built a new refinery in this country for over 10 years. We have a serious, long-term problem of our growing dependence on foreign sources of energy. That will always be the case, but we ought to be able to shift the trend and begin to move it in the right direction. We think we can do it in an environmentally sound manner.

Source: Vice-Presidential debate Oct 5, 2000

In 1980s, US needed limited spending for deficit & Cold War
Defending his votes against social spending, Cheney said he would be able to support more of social spending today, now that the budget deficit has been erased.
Cheney credited Reagan with ending the Cold War, which he said led to the end of deficits. He suggested that Clinton deserves little credit for the good economic times; saying his appointment of Alan Greenspan was his only accomplishment. “I don’t think the economy suddenly turned around when Clinton and Gore arrived in Washington,” he said.

Source: D. Ian Hopper, Associated Press Jul 26, 2000

Supported Balanced Budget Amendment
Where he stands:
opposed the Equal Rights Amendment
anti-abortion rights
supported prayer in schools
supported balanced budget amendment
Source: (X-ref Education) US News & World Report Jul 11, 1999

Investment in defense brings economic growth
Today inflation’s so low we rarely talk about it - some 3%. And our workers are still the most productive in the world. American goods and services are competitive around the globe. The US is now the world’s number one exporter with more than $500 billion in exports expected this year. Our economy depends on the peace and security brought by our investment in defense. That investment was modest, even at its peak, and, I might add, worth every penny.
Source: Speech at Lawrence Technical University Sep 14, 1992

Don’t fund domestic priorities by cutting defense
The defense budget is not a pot of gold. We cannot fix the deficit of fund all of our domestic priorities simply with the response of, take it out of defense. Dismantling our military will not solve our domestic problem, but it will destroy our ability to protect our interest and to shape the direction of world events. To cut defense, we have to do it right, [like] a sweeping restructuring of our armed forces that will reduce defense spending while still preserving the military capabilities we need.
Source: Speech at Lawrence Technical University Sep 14, 1992

Co-sponsored numerous bills for balancing the budget
Cheney co-sponsored the following bills in Congress:
H.J.RES.147 (1984):A joint resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution to require that congressional resolutions setting forth levels of total budget outlays and Federal revenues must be agreed to by two-thirds vote of both Houses of the Congress if the level of outlays exceeds the level of revenues.
H.R.5000 (1984) and H.R.1481 (1986):A bill to authorize the President, on a limited basis, to impound funds made available for the fiscal year when economic conditions necessitate reductions in the Federal deficit.
H.R.3520 (1986):A bill to require a graduated reduction of the Federal budget deficit, to balance the budget, to establish emergency procedures to avoid deficit overages.
H.J.RES.321 (1988):A joint resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution to provide for a balanced budget for the United States Government and for greater accountability in the enactment of tax legislation.
Source: Thomas Register of Congressional Votes Jan 1, 1986

Supported biennial budgeting for deficit reduction
Cheney co-sponsored the following bills in Congress:
H.R.748 (1986):A bill to amend the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 to provide for a two-year (biennial) budgeting cycle, and for other purposes.
H.J.RES.404 (1984):A joint resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States allowing an item veto in appropriations bills.
H.J.RES.243 (1984):A joint resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution relating to Federal budget procedures.
Source: Thomas Register of Congressional Votes Jan 1, 1986