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murral stark
11-15-2012, 10:21 PM
Why do some of you among us speak with what I call "Five dollar words"? By throwing out those fancy words, does that make you feel superior to others without the vocabulary you have aquired? Just curious is all.

Larry Thompson1
11-15-2012, 10:26 PM
Why do some of you among us speak with what I call "Five dollar words"? By throwing out those fancy words, does that make you feel superior to others without the vocabulary you have aquired? Just curious is all.

I think people try to use as much of thier vocabulary as possible to give true meaning to thier expressed point of view. Not to sound superior. Just my .02.

roseberry
11-15-2012, 10:30 PM
"five dollar" or "four letter", one needs to communicate effectively with the audience being addressed.

Larry Thompson1
11-15-2012, 10:37 PM
"five dollar" or "four letter", one needs to communicate effectively with the audience being addressed.

Here, here, most elegantly put forth.

BonMallari
11-15-2012, 10:50 PM
probably only two or maybe three guys on here that could use the "five dollar words" effectively and that is probably because of their upbringing and level of education and just plain being witty...trying to use big words when you dont know when to use them or what they mean is laughable...even worse is when you cant spell them correctly

HPL
11-15-2012, 11:10 PM
Here, here, most elegantly put forth.

Better watch out. That turn of phrase sounds a bit upper-crusty!

Having an extensive vocabulary can often allow one to be more precise. Red is a color, but crimson carries more information, as do vermilion and maroon. The same can be true of many other words. "Peregrinations" is more interesting than "travels", and "perambulate" more precise than "walk". There was a time when the ability to write well was actually admired. Personally I have always loved words (call me a logophile if you wish). I actually delight in encountering words with which I am unfamiliar. One of the things I really miss now that I mostly use the built in dictionary on the computer instead of a print dictionary is the opportunity stumble across new words while looking up the spelling or meaning of a word I already know. I read some word one the other day which I thought was very cool, and now I can't remember what it was or where I saw it. Leaves me somewhat peeved. I also admire correct grammar and good construct and detest the opposite.

HPL
11-15-2012, 11:19 PM
probably only two or maybe three guys on here that could use the "five dollar words" effectively and that is probably because of their upbringing and level of education and just plain being witty...trying to use big words when you dont know when to use them or what they mean is laughable...even worse is when you cant spell them correctly

My spelling is really pretty abysmal, so I keep spell check on all the time and also sometimes double check with the dictionary. I think that some of the tendency to stretch (vocabularily speaking) comes from what one reads, and what writers one admires. Ed Zern and Patrick McManus often had a very nice turn of phrase, as did Havilah Babcock. Hemingway was no slouch either.

Having a vocabulary allows one to accuse someone of suffering from logorrhea, which is much more elegant than "diarrhea of the mouth" a particularly unpleasant expression.

BonMallari
11-15-2012, 11:27 PM
I prefer someone say what they mean and mean what they say, unfortunately on these forums that is not always possible....and then there are those whose narrative is nothing but condescending and frankly a waste of time...but as they say Bless their Heart

HPL
11-15-2012, 11:32 PM
Doesn't take big words to be condescending (does makes it easier though ;-) )

Ken Bora
11-15-2012, 11:46 PM
I have said from forever RTF is a group of us standing at the tail gate of the pick up after runnin' our dogs.
I type just as if I was talking to you. I can say for sure I have never typed something I would not say to somebodys face.
Only better thing is here I can spell wrong to add humor now and again. I also very much enjoy words. Again back to grade school spelling and vocab lists. I will both talk, and type in the words my Grandfather and Grandmother used as I lived with them from '68 to '79. I used to think of myself the the worlds youngest depresion era baby. I like words like bill fold and trousers and foot feed (thats a gas pedal kids)

Murral, could you give some examples of these $5 words please?

Ken Bora
11-15-2012, 11:49 PM
I prefer someone say what they mean and mean what they say, unfortunately on these forums that is not always possible....and then there are those whose narrative is nothing but condescending and frankly a waste of time...but as they say Bless their Heart


tru-dat:D

oh, these two are fitty cent words!

get it, fitty cent????
I kill me:cool:

HPL
11-15-2012, 11:54 PM
Ken, I think you might be one of the folks he was talking about (knew I liked you all along). I know what a foot feed is too. Don't know if it was a common saying or not, but one of my buddies used to refer to the old foot starter switch with a rather colorful alliterative term that spoke of a piece of a jackass's anatomy.

BonMallari
11-15-2012, 11:54 PM
I have said from forever RTF is a group of us standing at the tail gate of the pick up after runnin' our dogs.
I type just as if I was talking to you. I can say for sure I have never typed something I would not say to somebodys face.
Only better thing is here I can spell wrong to add humor now and again. I also very much enjoy words. Again back to grade school spelling and vocab lists. I will both talk, and type in the words my Grandfather and Grandmother used as I lived with them from '68 to '79. I used to think of myself the the worlds youngest depresion era baby. I like words like bill fold and trousers and foot feed (thats a gas pedal kids)

Murral, could you give some examples of these $5 words please?



Ken you might be the straightest shooter of them all....You are also one of the few that I would want on my Name that Tune team, because you know lyrics better than I do, and I used to have to know that stuff on a former job (themed night club manager)

HPL
11-16-2012, 12:10 AM
Schadenfreude is a great word (even if i did have to look it up just to be sure I knew what it meant).

Ken Bora
11-16-2012, 12:11 AM
:2c:"Schadenfreude" used recently in a post. Trully a $5 + :2c: word. ;)

W.Strunk regards, JD

Huh? did I miss a thread about the Broadway musical Avenue Q???
I love show tunes. Anyone got a problem with that?!?!

edit, click the vid I love this song - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jvcRQiOraGE&feature=related

JDogger
11-16-2012, 12:24 AM
Huh? did I miss a thread about the Broadway musical Avenue Q???
I love show tunes. Anyone got a problem with that?!?!

Not at all, Ken.

Hugh, when B. Spitzer used it in an earlier post I had to look it up also. I didn't know it's show tune connotations. but I doubt Bill did either. JD

road kill
11-16-2012, 04:32 AM
Why do some of you among us speak with what I call "Five dollar words"? By throwing out those fancy words, does that make you feel superior to others without the vocabulary you have aquired? Just curious is all.
Amazing, I have to answer to you for the vocabulary I have acquired???
The better question might be how you have avoided acquiring a vocabulary................

Like it or not, I say what I mean and mean what I say and every now and then, I spell it correctly!!!:cool:
(not always though)

Ken Bora
11-16-2012, 07:09 AM
........ I didn't know it's show tune connotations. but I doubt Bill did either. JD

were did UB use this expensive word?

MooseGooser
11-16-2012, 07:32 AM
Some of us here just have the nackendicularaty to be proficferiouse with our enouncation of the vocancabulation of our verbage,..

SOME of us dont spell woth a hoot,, but I Imagine most graciously that the problem stems from the subjects attendence (Or lack of) in sub Par Unionisistrical educational facaliyes...

Iwas very fortunate tn my adolecesence that My Father pulled me from such places,, and put me strate to labor placing bricks and applying Mortoer,(French)

It IS very infortunatical,, that some here dont appreciate the colorful use of the spoken word///

Uncle Bill comes to mind... He really needs to polish it up afraction..

Elequintly as usual

Gooser

P,S,

Because of thedirect implimitational application of OBAMA care,, those 5 dollar words are now 20..

Ken Bora
11-16-2012, 07:46 AM
this is a fun link I like to check - http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/

As your body grows bigger Your mind grows flowered It's great to learn Cause knowledge is power!:cool:

Marvin S
11-16-2012, 08:58 AM
The use of words that flow effortlessly through a comment are appropriate, regardless of cost :cool:. I subscribe to certain magazines because of their writers ability to phrase comments correctly - one does not have to read too much to recognize the inability of many writers to make their point due to their lack of vocabulary. & yes I have a large Webster's sitting on a bookshelf next to the computer to check words I am unfamiliar with. I'm reading SI yesterday & there is an article about the owner of the Rams, Nuggets, Avalanche, Arsenal & several other sporting franchises. Though he ranks 92 on the list of wealthy he sounds very much like someone who would post here as a conservative :eek:. The author of the article noted that he was reading the book "The Revence of Geography" by Kaplan, a book that many of our congresscritters should have read before they committed us to the type of campaign we've seen in the ME. I finished the book last week & highly recommend it to those on here with the cognitive ability to recognize it's significance :razz:. I would also recommend the "Bell Curve", it would point out why some don't get it ;-).

JDogger
11-16-2012, 09:09 AM
were did UB use this expensive word?


http://www.retrievertraining.net/forums/showthread.php?91128-Tea-Leaves&p=1033966#post1033966

HPL
11-16-2012, 10:00 AM
The use of words that flow effortlessly through a comment are (IS) appropriate, regardless of cost :cool:. I subscribe to certain magazines because of their writers ability to phrase comments correctly - one does not have to read too much to recognize the inability of many writers to make their point due to their lack of vocabulary. & yes I have a large Webster's sitting on a bookshelf next to the computer to check words I am unfamiliar with. I'm reading SI yesterday & there is an article about the owner of the Rams, Nuggets, Avalanche, Arsenal & several other sporting franchises. Though he ranks 92 on the list of wealthy he sounds very much like someone who would post here as a conservative :eek:. The author of the article noted that he was reading the book "The Revence of Geography" by Kaplan, a book that many of our congresscritters should have read before they committed us to the type of campaign we've seen in the ME. I finished the book last week & highly recommend it to those on here with the cognitive ability to recognize it's significance :razz:. I would also recommend the "Bell Curve", it would point out why some don't get it ;-).


Nicely put (with one small correction, see above in blue and bold). The Bell Curve seems to be a rather controversial tome in some circles and it might only point out why some don't get it to those who do. It took me into my forties to realize that the reason some people do stupid things is because some people (actually somewhat over half the population) are significantly lacking in cognitive ability, and a good 25% or better are dumb as a stick. There really is no use in getting mad at them, no matter how frustrating it is. It's no more their fault than it is mine that I'm not a world class distance runner. The really hard part is keeping in mind that just as there are people who lack my cognitive abilities, there are many, many, many much closer than I to the righthand side of that curve ;-).

HPL
11-16-2012, 10:10 AM
this is a fun link I like to check - http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/

As your body grows bigger Your mind grows flowered It's great to learn Cause knowledge is power!:cool:

Howdy Ken!

Checked out the link and it really brought a smile to my face. First, never seen that word and would never have guessed a correct definition (unless perhaps I had heard it in context) and second, there was a thread the other day in which someone suggested that someone else's post had involved very little thought. Would have been a great opportunity to use THAT word. I think it's a keeper!! Will have to bookmark the site. Thanks!!
You better be careful, the Renaissance Man in you is showing through.

Daniel J Simoens
11-16-2012, 10:13 AM
I could have perdicted this

Paul "Happy" Gilmore
11-16-2012, 10:28 AM
The Bell Curve must be about clicker training if it is controversial on RTF..

Julie R.
11-16-2012, 10:31 AM
I too would like to see examples of what you consider five-dollar words, Murral. Personally, I've always enjoyed learning new words and new context for old ones. Like Ken, I write the same way I talk. If I see an unfamiliar word, I'll look it up. If I like it, I'll find a way to use it. And I appreciate good writers, whether of fiction, news articles and/or internet posts.


Thanks Ken, for that link. And schadenfreude is a good word, too, I'll definitely remember that one. But, I'd really like to learn some $5 words--help me out here, Murral.

murral stark
11-16-2012, 03:10 PM
I too would like to see examples of what you consider five-dollar words, Murral. Personally, I've always enjoyed learning new words and new context for old ones. Like Ken, I write the same way I talk. If I see an unfamiliar word, I'll look it up. If I like it, I'll find a way to use it. And I appreciate good writers, whether of fiction, news articles and/or internet posts.


Thanks Ken, for that link. And schadenfreude is a good word, too, I'll definitely remember that one. But, I'd really like to learn some $5 words--help me out here, Murral.

It's just an expression that my dad used to describe words that he had no idea what they meant. Just stuck with me. The one word I was referencing was that "schadenfreude". Another is bloviating just stuff like that. I was just curious to the reasoning behind the use of words like that.

murral stark
11-16-2012, 03:13 PM
Amazing, I have to answer to you for the vocabulary I have acquired???
The better question might be how you have avoided acquiring a vocabulary................

Like it or not, I say what I mean and mean what I say and every now and then, I spell it correctly!!!:cool:
(not always though)

What's up with that? I was asking a question didn't need someone to try and insult me.

Uncle Bill
11-16-2012, 03:32 PM
My spelling is really pretty abysmal, so I keep spell check on all the time and also sometimes double check with the dictionary. I think that some of the tendency to stretch (vocabularily speaking) comes from what one reads, and what writers one admires. Ed Zern and Patrick McManus often had a very nice turn of phrase, as did Havilah Babcock. Hemingway was no slouch either.

Having a vocabulary allows one to accuse someone of suffering from logorrhea, which is much more elegant than "diarrhea of the mouth" a particularly unpleasant expression.

If you enjoy reading McManus and Babcock, I would think you would also be a student of Buckingham and Gene Hill. My personal favorite and #1 author is Gordon MacQuarrie. His writings will enhance your vocabulary.

UB

PS...one of my favorite 'specialty' words came from a poster to RTF that we haven't seen on board for quite a while, and I miss his jocularity and poignancy in his answers to the ignorant...asshat. Where are you, Hew???

murral stark
11-16-2012, 04:18 PM
Here's another one. pilloried

murral stark
11-16-2012, 07:35 PM
I have said from forever RTF is a group of us standing at the tail gate of the pick up after runnin' our dogs.
I type just as if I was talking to you. I can say for sure I have never typed something I would not say to somebodys face.
Only better thing is here I can spell wrong to add humor now and again. I also very much enjoy words. Again back to grade school spelling and vocab lists. I will both talk, and type in the words my Grandfather and Grandmother used as I lived with them from '68 to '79. I used to think of myself the the worlds youngest depresion era baby. I like words like bill fold and trousers and foot feed (thats a gas pedal kids)

Murral, could you give some examples of these $5 words please?

Here are a few in this post by HPL. Although there was a meaning given for the words.

Having an extensive vocabulary can often allow one to be more precise. Red is a color, but crimson carries more information, as do vermilion and maroon. The same can be true of many other words. "Peregrinations" is more interesting than "travels", and "perambulate" more precise than "walk". There was a time when the ability to write well was actually admired. Personally I have always loved words (call me a logophile if you wish). I actually delight in encountering words with which I am unfamiliar. One of the things I really miss now that I mostly use the built in dictionary on the computer instead of a print dictionary is the opportunity stumble across new words while looking up the spelling or meaning of a word I already know. I read some word one the other day which I thought was very cool, and now I can't remember what it was or where I saw it. Leaves me somewhat peeved. I also admire correct grammar and good construct and detest the opposite

HPL
11-16-2012, 09:42 PM
If you enjoy reading McManus and Babcock, I would think you would also be a student of Buckingham and Gene Hill. My personal favorite and #1 author is Gordon MacQuarrie. His writings will enhance your vocabulary.

UB

PS...one of my favorite 'specialty' words came from a poster to RTF that we haven't seen on board for quite a while, and I miss his jocularity and poignancy in his answers to the ignorant...asshat. Where are you, Hew???

In reply to UB:
Sad to say that I just don't do as much reading as I used to. Seems like the days are just too full. S'pose if I gave up TV & the computer I'd have more time. Sometimes when sitting in the photo blinds I can do some reading, but have to be careful to keep one eye peeled so as not to miss anything special. Last really good thing I read was "Beyond the Wall" by Edward Abbey. I had never read anything by him before, but he has incredible phraseology; here is a snippet from another of his works quoted in Wikipedia: "....crags and pinnacles of naked rock, the dark cores of ancient volcanoes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volcanoes), a vast and silent emptiness smoldering with heat, color, and indecipherable significance, above which floated a small number of pure, clear, hard-edged clouds. For the first time, I felt I was getting close to the West of my deepest imaginings, the place where the tangible and the mythical became the same." Don't know if there are any five dollar words there, but, wow.

I got to know McManus reading Outdoor Life in the barber shop as a kid and later from my own subscription. I stumbled across Babcock's "I Don't Want to Shoot an Elephant" in a used book store, and just loved it. One of my treasured possessions. Have offered to let friends read it under the condition that it doesn't leave my property.
I am sure that I have read Gene Hill as I used to read both Field and Stream and Sports Afield. Will have to see if the library has any of his books (do you have a personal pick?). Just looked on the net to see if I recognized anything and found some great quotes: (about dogs) "I've had good ones and bad of several kinds. Most of the bad ones were my fault and most of the good ones would have been good under any circumstances." Gene Hill, and another one about life: "All we should ever count is hours; never birds, nor length of horn or hits or misses. If we want to do something where we can't lose, then we must accept the proposition that we cannot win. We are not involved in a contest, but a very simple and pure journey that promises each day out will be different, unrepeatable, unrecapturable.‎"

In further reply to Murral:
I read phrases like those above and think "None of those words are new to me. I've used everyone of them at some time or another. How come I never string them together like that?"

I think it is the admiration and even envy one feels when faced with such pure word-craft that influences one to strive, no matter how inadequately, to emulate notable writers. Part of that attempt involves looking for the EXACT word or phrase for the particular situation. That leads to learning and using words that some might consider five dollar or high-faluten. It is usually not an attempt to talk down to or be condescending to others. On the other hand, in a contentious exchange, the use of verbiage can often be an effective tool in making the opponent appear (and feel) outgunned.

murral stark
11-16-2012, 10:00 PM
Nicely written.

Uncle Bill
11-17-2012, 03:58 PM
For HPL...

Happy to hear you enjoy a good 'wordsmith'. So do I. Wish I could qualify, but fall short. Doesn't stop me from recognizing the good stuff, and continuing to emulate those I admire.

To that end, one of the very best was the late Gene Hill. Hilly, as he was affectionately known by his fellow writers, was like wearing an old pair of well-broken-in shoes...just plain comfortable to be with. And when you read his stories, that's how he made you feel. As did Gordon MacQuarrie.

If you don't have any MacQuarrie in your library, go to his families website and order the ODHA trilogy...a compilation of his masterpieces as compiled by his dear friend at Sports Afield, Zack Taylor. You will be enthralled. In his honor and memory, for over 30 years my hunting and fishing facility, fondly referred to as a 'cabin', although in reality was only a mobile home, carried the homemade sign nailed to the outer wall. The ODHA,inc, (the inc stood for incorrigable) was a way of life I gladly accepted.

http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d103/Uncle_Bill22/CabinSigns.jpg


Some of the books by Gene Hill that are included in my library that I especially enjoy reading over many times are: A Listening Walk; A Hunter's Fireside Stories; Outdoor Yarns and Outright Lies....that last one was co-authored with Steve Smith, one of Hilly's closest buddies, and editor of The Retriever Journal which I highly recommend to all that are Retriever lovers and trainers. Every now and then, Steve will include one of Hilly's stories in his mag. The most recent was one of Hilly's classics entitled "ONE". As is the case with many of those Hill stories, this was a big time tear-jerker.

As to my McManus collection, ir was begun as a gift from my eldest son...a set of four McManus soft covers: A fine and Pleasant Misery; They Shoot Canoes, Don't They?;Never Sniff A Gift Fish; The Grasshopper Trap. I later added Real Ponies Don't Go Oink; and Into The Twilight, Endlessly Grousing. That last one was the epitome of how McManus has become one of the finest authors using the double entendre. In that book is a story that is gut-wrenchingly funny, that after reading it several times, it causes me to laugh out loud...Hunting The Wily Avid. It's just outstandingly hilarious.


I hope you can find some of these tomes. They are as enjoyable as anything with which you can entertain yourself.

UB

I had intended to post a picture of my 'cabin' with it's tribute to Gordon MacQuarrie, but can't get into that file. I use it so seldom recently, I don't have the password or user name correct to access that program. That's what happens with getting to the stage in life when I can disremember if I had breakfast. If I get into that file, I'll add that pic then.

HPL
11-17-2012, 06:01 PM
I have "Never Sniff ....." and I think another of McManus's in my library. I'll have to check the public library for some of Gene Hill's.

Ken Bora
11-18-2012, 09:51 AM
were did UB use this expensive word?


http://www.retrievertraining.net/forums/showthread.php?91128-Tea-Leaves&p=1033966#post1033966


Nice Job UB! I mean it, a regular Dennis Miller understudy, you could be.

2tall
11-18-2012, 11:43 AM
Something I learned recently . . . $5.00 words are worthless unless used in a manner to convey their meaning to the "fifty cent" crowd. For instance, I recently used the word "stob" in a sentence. My non southern writer's class all jumped me at once saying that was not a word. They were right, it was a common slang word from my area that referred to the skinny, short stumps of pines that had been cut. The lesson learned was how to use and define the word all in one sentence so that a reader learned something too. This is a skill to be developed. The very best writers open horizons by offering new words and language in such a way that the meaning is clear. My goal now is to use new, more complex words for better description, not to flaunt a vocabulary.

I love this thread!

HPL
11-18-2012, 11:57 AM
Hey Ken!
Subscribed to M-W's "word of the day" the day you mentioned it and have already found three new words that could be used here daily: "ratiocination" (thought) the first word on the day I signed up, "sequacious" (intellectually servile) from the archives, and today's "pertinacious" (resolutely holding on to an opinion, purpose, or design). Unfortunately, the last two are somewhat pejorative (which is what would make them useful here) ;-).

HPL
11-18-2012, 12:07 PM
Something I learned recently . . . $5.00 words are worthless unless used in a manner to convey their meaning to the "fifty cent" crowd. For instance, I recently used the word "stob" in a sentence. My non southern writer's class all jumped me at once saying that was not a word. They were right, it was a common slang word from my area that referred to the skinny, short stumps of pines that had been cut. The lesson learned was how to use and define the word all in one sentence so that a reader learned something too. This is a skill to be developed. The very best writers open horizons by offering new words and language in such a way that the meaning is clear. My goal now is to use new, more complex words for better description, not to flaunt a vocabulary.

I love this thread!


Actually, I checked, and "stob" IS in the Merriam Webster's online dictionary, so it is officially a word!! I believe that I have used it before, and certainly would recognize it in context.

Can you give an example of how you would use that word so that it was defined without actually saying "The hunter cursed at all the stobs (short, thin, pine stumps) that covered the recent clear-cut like the spines on a hedgehog's back and hindered his already challenging stalk."?

2tall
11-18-2012, 12:46 PM
LOL @ HPL! (isnt it funny how easily we learn a new language when we have too;)) Where the heck were you last Thursday? I pulled up all the dictionaries I could get on my IPhone at the time, and could not prove my contention that stob was a real word! Honestly, I was struck dumb to find out not one person in the group had ever heard the word. These are folks with more letters after their names than in mine.

Here is the original sentence, "As she raced through the bramble, thorns and stobs tore at Becky's ankles and ripped her jeans". The suggestion, "thorns and stobs, small sharp stumps of harvested pines, tore at Becky's, etc., etc. I didn't like that much so just added a sentence to the original, ala: "Racing through the bramble, thorns and stobs tore at Becky's ankles and ripped her jeans. The field was covered in these short sharp stumps of harvested pines."

I will see how that flies in class next week. But now I am tempted to go back to the original and tell 'em to look it up in Merriam Webster! But the idea is the same. Learn to convey meaning through use. Now I am going to have to write a sentence using sequacious without being overly servile. Not my style.:cool:

HPL
11-18-2012, 01:08 PM
This IS a fun thread, and even though I suspect that it may have been started with at least a little malicious intent it has turned out to be convivial and pretty informative.

Sequacious is just a mean word, but pertinacious can swing either way. I would not expect anyone using either one to be particularly servile (another somewhat mean word).

2tall
11-18-2012, 01:13 PM
Hey Ken!
Subscribed to M-W's "word of the day" the day you mentioned it and have already found three new words that could be used here daily: "ratiocination" (thought) the first word on the day I signed up, "sequacious" (intellectually servile) from the archives, and today's "pertinacious" (resolutely holding on to an opinion, purpose, or design). Unfortunately, the last two are somewhat pejorative (which is what would make them useful here) ;-).

Not? (sorry have to use more words!)

Uncle Bill
11-18-2012, 01:22 PM
This IS a fun thread, and even though I suspect that it may have been started with at least a little malicious intent it has turned out to be convivial and pretty informative.

Sequacious is just a mean word, but pertinacious can swing either way. I would not expect anyone using either one to be particularly servile (another somewhat mean word).

If you find it amusing to rankle the obtuse among us, HPL, you may want to invest in a couple books by Eugene Ehrlich. Another quick source of 'interesting' words can be found in Bill O'Reilly's tome of "Factor Words"...designed to increase your 'ascerbity'.

UB

HPL
11-18-2012, 01:33 PM
If you find it amusing to rankle the obtuse among us, HPL, you may want to invest in a couple books by Eugene Ehrlich. Another quick source of 'interesting' words can be found in Bill O'Reilly's tome of "Factor Words".

UB

That first sentence is great. Obtuse is a wonderful word. I use it relatively often. I think growing up with a teacher and librarian for a mother, an english teacher (and head of the english dept) for an aunt, and a grandmother that was also a teacher had a lot to do with the development of my vocabulary. Everybody in the family, including my brother and cousins talk this way. In my "formative" years two of our favorite games were Scrabble, and Password. Just couldn't escape it.

hotel4dogs
11-18-2012, 02:24 PM
what a bunch of piffle ;)
My favorite word is defenestration, although I don't get much chance to use it.

HPL
11-18-2012, 02:33 PM
what a bunch of piffle ;)
My favorite word is defenestration, although I don't get much chance to use it.

I like that one too, although I prefer the verb forms as in "Did he jump, or was he defenestrated?" or "You better smile when you say that or I may be forced to defenestrate you!" or even, "Here comes the constabulary, mayhaps it would be advisable to defenestrate the contraband!" . "Piffle"'s pretty good too. ;-)

Uncle Bill
11-18-2012, 02:35 PM
what a bunch of piffle ;)
My favorite word is defenestration, although I don't get much chance to use it.

Thanks for that, Barb. Since the advent of adulthood, I don't have much use for defenestration anymore. As a beer drinking rowdy teen, however, we thought it was kool to litter the ditches in that manner.

One of my favorite stories attributed to the Navy, was during orientation, the Captain stated to the new troops, "Men, from now on you will refer to the left side of this ship as port, and the right side as starboard. If I hear you screw up, I'll throw you out of one of those little round windows."

UB

hotel4dogs
11-18-2012, 02:43 PM
ha ha, violators will be subject to defenestration, love it!

Ken Bora
11-18-2012, 04:40 PM
Hey Ken!
Subscribed to M-W's "word of the day" the day you mentioned it and have already found three new words that could be used here daily: "ratiocination" (thought) the first word on the day I signed up, "sequacious" (intellectually servile) from the archives, and today's "pertinacious" (resolutely holding on to an opinion, purpose, or design). Unfortunately, the last two are somewhat pejorative (which is what would make them useful here) ;-).


todays word "pertinacious" is a good un!
I enjoy the word of the day email.
Murral, sign up for it and you'll be talkin with so many $5 words your work force will be needing a debit card to know what you are telling them to do!!!!! click http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/ scroll to bottom and add email address

Ken Bora
11-18-2012, 04:45 PM
. As a beer drinking rowdy teen, however, we thought it was kool to litter the ditches in that manner.

UB

for my mates and I, mail boxes and road signs were in our ken. ;-)

road kill
11-18-2012, 04:58 PM
Why do some of you among us speak with what I call "Five dollar words"? By throwing out those fancy words, does that make you feel superior to others without the vocabulary you have aquired? Just curious is all.
It is not so much the value of the words as it is the economy of their dispatch!!!!!:cool:

murral stark
11-18-2012, 06:08 PM
todays word "pertinacious" is a good un!
I enjoy the word of the day email.
Murral, sign up for it and you'll be talkin with so many $5 words your work force will be needing a debit card to know what you are telling them to do!!!!! click http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/ scroll to bottom and add email address

The majority of the people that work for me, barely speak english, let alone understand the words that I would learn. Kinda like when they are trying to tell me something in broken english. they get frustrated because they can't tell me what they want to say and I look at them with that "deer in the headlights" look. Luckily, my fellow supervisor is fluent in both languages. I am glad that I finally started a thread that everyone enjoys. It has been some interesting reading to say the least.

JDogger
11-18-2012, 08:44 PM
We talk about the value of words. We may subscribe to MW word-a-day websites. We may endeavor to learn a new word every day and use it in a sentence. What do we really know about the loom of language? The origins of the words we use every day as opposed to those that we use infrequently?
To know the origin of words is to know how men think.
Our language is truly international. The American speech, like the American people, comes from all over the world. Not two percent of our English words first rose in the British Isles.

(Which may dispute the English only argument so favored by many.)

Somewhere in the Near East they seem to have started, in that Garden of Eden of earliest man, brought home by the three restless mingler’s, the soldier, the trader, and the priest.
So we have our modern American language. It includes Greek, Latin, and other Indo-Asian, as well as Germanic, and Celtic words.

G’night, JD

MooseGooser
11-18-2012, 08:58 PM
This IS a fun thread, and even though I suspect that it may have been started with at least a little malicious intent it has turned out to be convivial and pretty informative.

Sequacious is just a mean word, but pertinacious can swing either way. I would not expect anyone using either one to be particularly servile (another somewhat mean word).



I'm Out!!:confused:

See,, Simple words!:):)

Gooser

HPL
11-18-2012, 09:20 PM
We talk about the value of words. We may subscribe to MW word-a-day websites. We may endeavor to learn a new word every day and use it in a sentence. What do we really know about the loom of language? The origins of the words we use every day as opposed to those that we use infrequently?
To know the origin of words is to know how men think.
Our language is truly international. The American speech, like the American people, comes from all over the world. Not two percent of our English words first rose in the British Isles.

(Which may dispute the English only argument so favored by many.)

Somewhere in the Near East they seem to have started, in that Garden of Eden of earliest man, brought home by the three restless mingler’s, the soldier, the trader, and the priest.
So we have our modern American language. It includes Greek, Latin, and other Indo-Asian, as well as Germanic, and Celtic words.

G’night, JD

Although I don't know the origin of any of the words in this sentence, I would bet that many of those with more extensive vocabularies are aware of the roots and origins of many of the words they use. I think that I can often recognize latin and greek origins; not so much middle eastern or germanic. The latin and greek root recognition comes from all the taxonomic stuff in biology. These days, one has to wonder how many "English" words have infiltrated their way back into their tongues of origin since not only do soldiers, traders, and priests pick up words, they must surely leave some behind.

JDogger
11-18-2012, 09:36 PM
Although I don't know the origin of any of the words in this sentence, I would bet that many of those with more extensive vocabularies are aware of the roots and origins of many of the words they use. I think that I can often recognize latin and greek origins; not so much middle eastern or germanic. The latin and greek root recognition comes from all the taxonomic stuff in biology. These days, one has to wonder how many "English" words have infiltrated their way back into their tongues of origin since not only do soldiers, traders, and priests pick up words, they must surely leave some behind.

Really?.... when did you speak last to a phone center in another country?

"Blows my mind regards," JD

HPL
11-18-2012, 09:59 PM
Really?.... when did you speak last to a phone center in another country?

"Blows my mind regards," JD

Not exactly what I meant. Certainly I am aware that English has in many ways become the lingua franca. I was really referring more to words that started out as latin, greek, arabic, etc., were picked up and Anglicized, and may have now wended their way back into either their language of origin or some other language.

JDogger
11-18-2012, 10:34 PM
Not exactly what I meant. Certainly I am aware that English has in many ways become the lingua franca. I was really referring more to words that started out as latin, greek, arabic, etc., were picked up and Anglicized, and may have now wended their way back into either their language of origin or some other language.

Ok... Gotcha...;)

And now the language of the text or the forum post has added another dimension... God help us.

murral stark
11-19-2012, 05:18 PM
I signed up for it. Could turn out to be very interesting. At least now, possibly I will have an idea of what people are saying when they throw out these "5 dollar words". LOL

Ken Bora
11-19-2012, 05:22 PM
we will keep that in mind when we lambast you next ;)

murral stark
11-20-2012, 10:50 PM
we will keep that in mind when we lambast you next ;)

By learning all of these words, I will be much more educated and less likely to give you the opportunity to lambast me.

Ken Bora
11-24-2012, 07:14 AM
Hey Murral, todays word,
obdurate. :D

HPL
11-24-2012, 10:15 AM
Ken, I'll say it again, for the last week or so, it seems like the "Daily Word" has been aimed right at POTUS on RTF!!

Ken Bora
11-26-2012, 04:50 PM
Ken, I'll say it again, for the last week or so, it seems like the "Daily Word" has been aimed right at POTUS on RTF!!

I noted you picked up yahoo in my a.m. RTF sederunt.

Uncle Bill
12-04-2012, 03:29 PM
'Splain dat 'sederunt' thingy, please.

UB

PS I did find my 'cabin' pic referring to Gordon MacQuerrie, and inserted it in that post.

thebigcat
12-04-2012, 04:17 PM
Doesn't take big words to be condescending (does makes it easier though ;-) )

That's for sure!

coachmo
12-05-2012, 12:28 PM
It's obvious that much of the rhetoric on rtf lacks any degree of eloquence for sure.

murral stark
12-05-2012, 05:26 PM
It's obvious that much of the rhetoric on rtf lacks any degree of eloquence for sure.

There are some here that have the vocabulary to tell people to "go get", well you know the rest of the phrase, and some of us that don't have the vocabluary wouldn't even realize what they actually said. It would flow so freely from them that we'd think they were saying something nice.

HPL
12-05-2012, 06:10 PM
It's obvious that much of the rhetoric on rtf lacks any degree of eloquence for sure.


I b'leive I resent that!

coachmo
12-05-2012, 07:55 PM
Jus funing wit ya!