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View Full Version : MILK PRICE and farm bill



luvmylabs23139
01-01-2013, 09:45 AM
OK , so I still can't figure any of this out. Can someone explain this to me?
If some bill that nobody says what it means does not get extended I will now pay $8 for a gallon of milk at the grocery store. But what am I as a federal income tax payer currently paying in taxes for someone elses milk? Other than the 2 weeks around xmas I never even use a quart in a week.
So, have I been paying another bunch of money for more socialism to pay for the milk someone else consumes????
Screwed again!

luvmylabs23139
01-01-2013, 10:00 AM
Let me add that if the gooberment has so much control over the price why can I buy a gallon of milk at Sams for less than a half gallon at any of the 3 major grocery stores within 5 minutes of my house?
I buy milk whenever I go to SAM's because I save money tossing more than half down the drain.

paul young
01-01-2013, 11:44 AM
Let me add that if the gooberment has so much control over the price why can I buy a gallon of milk at Sams for less than a half gallon at any of the 3 major grocery stores within 5 minutes of my house?
I buy milk whenever I go to SAM's because I save money tossing more than half down the drain.

The milk we buy at the store is really a bargain; the average price paid to the farmer nowadays is around $17 per hundred pounds. The dairy farmers have been struggling to make ends meet for years.

One of the farms I hunt on has a sign at the end of the driveway. It reads;

NO FARMS,

NO FOOD;

NO FUTURE!

NOBODY works harder to make a living than a farmer.....-Paul

luvmylabs23139
01-01-2013, 12:02 PM
The milk we buy at the store is really a bargain; the average price paid to the farmer nowadays is around $17 per hundred pounds. The dairy farmers have been struggling to make ends meet for years.

One of the farms I hunt on has a sign at the end of the driveway. It reads;

NO FARMS,

NO FOOD;

NO FUTURE!

NOBODY works harder to make a living than a farmer.....-Paul

So still explain who is paying for milk. The taxpayer who may not be using it or >>>>
Why not let it be fair market?
I pay federal income taxes. Why do I pay federal income taxes so someone who pays nothing and most likey gets a socialist check from me get a deal on milk?

Marvin S
01-01-2013, 01:52 PM
The milk we buy at the store is really a bargain; the average price paid to the farmer nowadays is around $17 per hundred pounds. The dairy farmers have been struggling to make ends meet for years.

One of the farms I hunt on has a sign at the end of the driveway. It reads;

NO FARMS,

NO FOOD;

NO FUTURE!

NOBODY works harder to make a living than a farmer.....-Paul

My son's in that business, one of the few with a degree. He's into the value added part: hard cheese (award winning, even the stuff not up to his standard is good), fresh cheese & ice cream. Labor (WA has the highest Min wage in the US) & transport are killers. The regulators do not like dealing with the little guys, their bosses get more campaign donations from the big guys ;-). 16 hour days are the norm, but that's what he chose, also takes no govt. handouts :cool:. I admire his independence. Though he feeds very little grain his grain has more than doubled in 4 years - ethanol being the driver, which cause farmers to rotate out of small grain into corn more often, creating a shortage of all commodities.

Most of the stores get their produce & fresh stuff from the same wholesaler - they profess to but don't want to deal with the small guys. Makes a good advertising slogan. As a consumer I source what I eat & will pay more for wholesome products where the animals & farming conditions are a priority to the producer. I can tell the difference as I was raised organic but in those days we just called it food :)

$17/cwt will give you about 8 1/2 gallons of whole milk from the farmer. The value added people will skim some cream & manufacture various other commodity like products to make their bottom line presentable but it's a tough business. I have a picture showing a warehouse full of macaroni cheese in a salt mine in MO. Most Cheddar is sold in 100 pound wheels for around $2.00/lb. You do know that if someone advertises bSrt free, that the only one who could verify that is the outfit selling the stuff as there is no test to determine usage or not!

I'm on an auction list - there are manufacturing facilities going under regularly - big & little ones alike.

charly_t
01-01-2013, 02:01 PM
The milk we buy at the store is really a bargain; the average price paid to the farmer nowadays is around $17 per hundred pounds. The dairy farmers have been struggling to make ends meet for years.

One of the farms I hunt on has a sign at the end of the driveway. It reads;

NO FARMS,

NO FOOD;

NO FUTURE!

NOBODY works harder to make a living than a farmer.....-Paul

Thats the truth. I know nothing about farm bills etc. All I know is that while my Mother-in-law was still alive it cost her more to produce the small amount of milk that they ( family members ) used than it would if they had bought it at the stores. The difference was that the milk produced by her cows tasted like milk should !

Government should never try to fix things because they always mess it up. They said on the news that family farms would not be exempt from the estate tax I believe. Try passing it down to family members and you get hit big time. It is not possible to buy a farm now days and start from scratch unless you are wealthy to start with.

charly_t
01-01-2013, 02:22 PM
My son's in that business, one of the few with a degree. He's into the value added part: hard cheese (award winning, even the stuff not up to his standard is good), fresh cheese & ice cream. Labor (WA has the highest Min wage in the US) & transport are killers. The regulators do not like dealing with the little guys, their bosses get more campaign donations from the big guys ;-). 16 hour days are the norm, but that's what he chose, also takes no govt. handouts :cool:. I admire his independence. Though he feeds very little grain his grain has more than doubled in 4 years - ethanol being the driver, which cause farmers to rotate out of small grain into corn more often, creating a shortage of all commodities.

Most of the stores get their produce & fresh stuff from the same wholesaler - they profess to but don't want to deal with the small guys. Makes a good advertising slogan. As a consumer I source what I eat & will pay more for wholesome products where the animals & farming conditions are a priority to the producer. I can tell the difference as I was raised organic but in those days we just called it food :)

$17/cwt will give you about 8 1/2 gallons of whole milk from the farmer. The value added people will skim some cream & manufacture various other commodity like products to make their bottom line presentable but it's a tough business. I have a picture showing a warehouse full of macaroni cheese in a salt mine in MO. Most Cheddar is sold in 100 pound wheels for around $2.00/lb. You do know that if someone advertises bSrt free, that the only one who could verify that is the outfit selling the stuff as there is no test to determine usage or not!

I'm on an auction list - there are manufacturing facilities going under regularly - big & little ones alike.

Well said I'm sorry to say. By the way if your son does a mail order business, please, send his link etc. to me in a private message. Mother used to order cheese and it was fantastic but I no longer have the info for it.

J Connolly
01-01-2013, 03:14 PM
Milk has been subsidized for at least 40 years. The idea is that the subsidies stabilize the market. It seems like it is causing over production and marginal profits. The take home lesson about the farm bill is that only about 20% goes to farmers. The rest to food stamps.

dback
01-01-2013, 03:47 PM
The take home lesson about the farm bill is that only about 20% goes to farmers. The rest to food stamps.

Bingo........easier to sell to general population if you focus on milk prices.......a full 80% of farm bill is food stamps. We're even nice enough to give some to Mexico so the Mexican government can educate their population how to acquire food stamps once they have "immigrated" to the US. Wacky world ain't it?

Dan Storts
01-01-2013, 04:32 PM
Another way of comparing the milk subsidy/farm bill is through real estate taxes. Even if you do not have any kids in school you are subsidizing those who do because the greatest portion of your property taxes go to the schools.

charly_t
01-01-2013, 05:41 PM
Another way of comparing the milk subsidy/farm bill is through real estate taxes. Even if you do not have any kids in school you are subsidizing those who do because the greatest portion of your property taxes go to the schools.

Yep, husband was reading our county tax statement to me a few days back. Most of the money went to schools.

County General ( a little over 10% of total )
4 Mill
School General ( almost half of total, about 46% )
School Building
School Sinking ( a sizable amount also when compared to other things )
Voc Tech
Voc Building

Dan Storts
01-01-2013, 06:32 PM
Foreign countries have bought up a lot of the maga mike producing farms. The expiration of the farm bill would have put the smaller farmers on more of a level playing field. This is because instead of their prices being fixed at a certain dollar per hundred pounds. It would be a little more like corn, wheat and soybeans. Farmers in my area this year made more, on a profit basis per acre, which they was able to turn into farm insurance at 3 to 7 bushel a acre on corn then on acreage they had a average of 150 bushel. It is call farming by mail.

Sabireley
01-02-2013, 06:31 AM
http://www.cato.org/sites/cato.org/files/pubs/pdf/tbb_0707_47.pdf
This is from 2007 and explains how the federal milk subsidies work. CATO is a libertarian think tank.

caryalsobrook
01-02-2013, 07:19 AM
What a clasic example of what can happen when the gov. regulates the market if the name of HELPING. It has so distorted the market for milk that if it suddenly removed influence, the price doubles. Gov. milk policy was initiated in the 1930's when farmers literally poured milk on the ground because of the low price. Today we have futures markets which gives producers a good idea of what they can get for their product and an idea of what their cost will be. A capitalist system that better allocates the means of production and produces products at the best possible price. A system much better than the old style Soviet 5 year programs with central planning. A system run by people that think they are smarter than the market. The fact is THEY ARE NOT SMARTER, and that makes them idiots.

Dan Storts
01-02-2013, 10:00 AM
http://www.cato.org/sites/cato.org/files/pubs/pdf/tbb_0707_47.pdf
This is from 2007 and explains how the federal milk subsidies work. CATO is a libertarian think tank.

Think milk subsidy is crazy and it is nothing in relation to what the sugar beet farmers receive.

swampcollielover
01-02-2013, 10:43 AM
Good discussion points from all, but let's be clear,Government representatives never truly try to help or do good, they only dowhatever they think will get them votes....follow the money back to where it isbeing sent and you will always find the true incentive of our electedofficials, be it Unions, Welfare recipients, etc.

At the heart of any society that is 'failing' or has failed, is corruptGovernments

caryalsobrook
01-02-2013, 11:03 AM
Good discussion points from all, but let's be clear,Government representatives never truly try to help or do good, they only dowhatever they think will get them votes....follow the money back to where it isbeing sent and you will always find the true incentive of our electedofficials, be it Unions, Welfare recipients, etc.

At the heart of any society that is 'failing' or has failed, is corruptGovernments


I could not agree more. The more the gov. does, the more corrupt both the gov. and society becomes.