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View Full Version : Education ... is there any way to fix this?



Gerry Clinchy
01-19-2013, 03:09 PM
http://townhall.com/columnists/marygrabar/2013/01/19/common-core-orwellian-lessons-in-florida-n1490561/page/full/

When Race To The Top funding was accepted by states (45 now get that money), it came with strings attached. And the SAT tests are catering to the curricula of the program.

And who is behind this stuff? "Educators" (I use the term loosely) like Bill Ayres and Arne Duncan ... who did such a stellar job with Chicago's school system. NOT! When the context of an EPA regulation is put on a par with The Gettysburg Address, we are in deep doo-doo.


But the mandate to replace literature in English classes with “informational texts”—with only half the time allotted to literature, and reduced to only 30 percent by the last two years of high school—caught the attention of even the liberal media (http://frontpagemag.com/2012/mary-grabar/common-core-phasing-western-culture-out-of-education/). They became alarmed that favorites like To Kill a Mockingbird and Catcher in the Rye are to be replaced by such things as EPA directives.

Uncle Bill
01-19-2013, 07:27 PM
Only one way...eliminate the Cabinet level department of education. Send all the responsibility back to the individual states, and on to the individual school districts and their elected officials to get involved in their local programs, and stop sucking up to the fed and their one-size-fits-all programs that ALWAYS come with strings attached. It's time for the parents to get involved again...for a School board electee to take responsibility for more than just the crossing guards, and parking lot congestion.

So little of the entire budget of a particular school is managed by the local parents, it's astounding. What is mandated and controlled by someone other than the board of education for your individual school district is mind boggling. Time to get all that control back, and start requiring the parents of the kids being taught to become involved beyond just dropping them off and picking them up...and for those that don't do that, I'm for eliminating the school busses also.

People have got to understand it's time to become responsible Americans again. Stop handing off those responsibilities to the "other" person. Ot's all part of taking our nation back from the socialistic direction it's been heading for far too long.

UB

sick lids
01-19-2013, 08:12 PM
Funny seeing this here I know a teacher that if I said that she leans way to the left would be a little of an understatement. She always complains how the government is interfering with how she teaches and that she seems to spend more time testing than teaching. So I asked her why she keeps voting for these ya hoos and her mouth dropped with disbelief. Four years later its still Bushe's fault. I have a feeling obummer will fix it for HER in the next four.

Schmersal
01-19-2013, 08:57 PM
So eliminating school transportation for good responsible students of hard working responsible two income families that have no other way of getting their children to school in the morning is going to help our failing educational system. In my belief I think the government at the federal, state and local level should be more responsible for their actions and held more accountable. And the biggest problem with this country and its educational system and its government is that people just don't care anymore weather it be teachers, parents, school officials or even government officials. Our family votes for every tax levy that our school board puts on the ballot and are happy to do so because we know it will make things better for our children and the community, and will continue to after our children are out of school. This is more than a parent/teacher/teachers union/school board/government issue, it is a continuous degradation of morality, ethics, and economics in the U.S.A. Americans just don't care about the foundation of respect, compassion, and humanity any more and I am sorry to say that greed, self promotion and political correctness have taken their place. Our educational system in the last report I seen doesn't even rank in the top 20 of the world, that is unforgivable we owe our children and the children of all Americans more than that. I don't know how we can fix the issues facing our educational system or country for that matter but I think a good starting point would be to teach our children the golden rule and get adults to live by it. Just my .02 cents.

Brad Turner
01-19-2013, 09:04 PM
So eliminating school transportation for good responsible students of hard working responsible two income families that have no other way of getting their children to school in the morning is going to help our failing educational system. In my belief I think the government at the federal, state and local level should be more responsible for their actions and held more accountable. And the biggest problem with this country and its educational system and its government is that people just don't care anymore weather it be teachers, parents, school officials or even government officials. Our family votes for every tax levy that our school board puts on the ballot and are happy to do so because we know it will make things better for our children and the community, and will continue to after our children are out of school. This is more than a parent/teacher/teachers union/school board/government issue, it is a continuous degradation of morality, ethics, and economics in the U.S.A. Americans just don't care about the foundation of respect, compassion, and humanity any more and I am sorry to say that greed, self promotion and political correctness have taken their place. Our educational system in the last report I seen doesn't even rank in the top 20 of the world, that is unforgivable we owe our children and the children of all Americans more than that. I don't know how we can fix the issues facing our educational system or country for that matter but I think a good starting point would be to teach our children the golden rule and get adults to live by it. Just my .02 cents.
The only problem with this statement, is that many other countries don't educate ALL their children as we do here in the U.S.

Marvin S
01-19-2013, 10:05 PM
http://townhall.com/columnists/marygrabar/2013/01/19/common-core-orwellian-lessons-in-florida-n1490561/page/full/

When Race To The Top funding was accepted by states (45 now get that money), it came with strings attached. And the SAT tests are catering to the curricula of the program.

And who is behind this stuff? "Educators" (I use the term loosely) like Bill Ayres and Arne Duncan ... who did such a stellar job with Chicago's school system. NOT! When the context of an EPA regulation is put on a par with The Gettysburg Address, we are in deep doo-doo.

I am the product of testing - 6th in a class of 11, but in the top 10 of about 15,000 students statewide taking the Iowa test my senior year in HS. Needless to say that led to many offers, mostly by liberal arts colleges up to & including full rides. One school offered a 15K scholarship, 10K GIA & would have still cost 15K more in 1950. Had I wanted to go to MIT I could have, never heard of the school :). Did have an offer to play BasketBall at Baylor which I would have taken had I known the school was challenging academically.

Until we allow charter schools nationwide, eliminate the DoE at the national level & emphasize STEM monetarily, which would include making aid for worthless degrees very hard to get. I have a GS with a degree in Architecture who will have to go back to school to get an Engineering degree to be employable.

I've studied the school thing seriously, as long as we rely on the politicians & the unions to guide the fix, it ain't gonna happen :eek:.


Only one way...eliminate the Cabinet level department of education. Send all the responsibility back to the individual states, and on to the individual school districts and their elected officials to get involved in their local programs, and stop sucking up to the fed and their one-size-fits-all programs that ALWAYS come with strings attached. It's time for the parents to get involved again...for a School board electee to take responsibility for more than just the crossing guards, and parking lot congestion.

So little of the entire budget of a particular school is managed by the local parents, it's astounding. What is mandated and controlled by someone other than the board of education for your individual school district is mind boggling. Time to get all that control back, and start requiring the parents of the kids being taught to become involved beyond just dropping them off and picking them up...and for those that don't do that, I'm for eliminating the school busses also.

People have got to understand it's time to become responsible Americans again. Stop handing off those responsibilities to the "other" person. Ot's all part of taking our nation back from the socialistic direction it's been heading for far too long.

UB

UB, I respect your opinion, but there are a lot of kids who would not be in school if it were a parental requirement to get them there :(, but true. & at a higher cost to the public!!!!!


So eliminating school transportation for good responsible students of hard working responsible two income families that have no other way of getting their children to school in the morning is going to help our failing educational system. In my belief I think the government at the federal, state and local level should be more responsible for their actions and held more accountable. And the biggest problem with this country and its educational system and its government is that people just don't care anymore weather it be teachers, parents, school officials or even government officials. Our family votes for every tax levy that our school board puts on the ballot and are happy to do so because we know it will make things better for our children and the community, and will continue to after our children are out of school. This is more than a parent/teacher/teachers union/school board/government issue, it is a continuous degradation of morality, ethics, and economics in the U.S.A. Americans just don't care about the foundation of respect, compassion, and humanity any more and I am sorry to say that greed, self promotion and political correctness have taken their place. Our educational system in the last report I seen doesn't even rank in the top 20 of the world, that is unforgivable we owe our children and the children of all Americans more than that. I don't know how we can fix the issues facing our educational system or country for that matter but I think a good starting point would be to teach our children the golden rule and get adults to live by it. Just my .02 cents.

I bet no one picked you 1st when choosing teams for the spelling bee :-P. I think it's wonderful that you like to see money wasted & a blind loyalty to whatever the school administration wants will do just that. Prior to being appointed & elected twice to the School Board I followed that same loyalty, after serving that changed & I have never voted for a levy since. I'm fairly good with numbers & balance sheets so will tell you I know what I am talking about without even looking at your budget.

Schmersal
01-19-2013, 10:58 PM
I bet no one picked you 1st when choosing teams for the spelling bee :-P. I think it's wonderful that you like to see money wasted & a blind loyalty to whatever the school administration wants will do just that. Prior to being appointed & elected twice to the School Board I followed that same loyalty, after serving that changed & I have never voted for a levy since. I'm fairly good with numbers & balance sheets so will tell you I know what I am talking about without even looking at your budget.[/QUOTE]


I didn't get picked first for any thing but I turned out ok ;) (that was before everything had to be fair so nobody got their feelings hurt), and its not a blind loyalty but I know what they have done for my children. If I were as close to the situation as you have been I might have a different opinion but for now being involved in my boys education and helping the school system any way I can including voting for levies is the best I can do!

luvalab
01-20-2013, 12:40 AM
First, yes, I'm a teacher--private parochial, but believe me, we see it all, too.

Second, yes, the Common Core is about money. Big money. And like in most professions, the big money isn't always going to the most deserving circles.

All that aside--if anyone really thinks that the Common Core curriculum demands that English classes reduce their attention to literature and the classics, they are mistaken, for sure. That is simply not what the Common Core documents state. The suggested percentages are ACROSS THE SCHOOL CURRICULUM. I know that in reality a lot of the reading and writing in school falls on the English departments while other departments stick to overheads and lectures and synopses, and so the fear coming from English teachers is real in a sense--but that's not the fault of the Common Core as it's written.

What Common Core DOES do is ask that English classes teach and support non-fiction and primary source reading (which we should be doing anyway), drop most of the "young adult" category as the waste of time crap that it is (which we should be doing anyway), and require classes other than English to actually read (which we should be doing anyway).

Surely no one believes that an EPA document is equal in greatness and importance to the Gettysburg Address--but if most citizens could actually read, comprehend, analyze, and argue with or about EPA documents, we'd all be better off in the long run. The Gettysburg Address is short--there's no reason NOT to read it, every year, more than once--even if contemporary modern documents are included in the curriculum.

I'm not a fan of the Common Core because there's big money being made re-inventing the wheel and putting shiny hub-caps on it. I am also borderline furious that there will be high-stakes testing attached to it that has not been developed beyond "It's going to be super-challenging and all on computers," because everyone was so eager to get the (money) ball rolling--which is ass-backward. But what's new?

Common Core itself is fairly demanding and, really, what good teachers and schools are already doing and will continue to do. It's also a reality (for now), and I'd rather throw my shoulder out fighting other windmills. Or handling dogs, as the case may be.

But will Common Core make bad teachers and schools good? Heh. It might light a fire under a few butts here and there. Or not. It might tighten some curricula up here and there, if implemented wisely. Or not.

Just my opinions.

HPL
01-20-2013, 01:13 AM
I bet no one picked you 1st when choosing teams for the spelling bee :-P. I think it's wonderful that you like to see money wasted & a blind loyalty to whatever the school administration wants will do just that. Prior to being appointed & elected twice to the School Board I followed that same loyalty, after serving that changed & I have never voted for a levy since. I'm fairly good with numbers & balance sheets so will tell you I know what I am talking about without even looking at your budget.

I didn't get picked first for any thing but I turned out ok ;) (that was before everything had to be fair so nobody got their feelings hurt), and its not a blind loyalty but I know what they have done for my children. If I were as close to the situation as you have been I might have a different opinion but for now being involved in my boys education and helping the school system any way I can including voting for levies is the best I can do![/QUOTE]

I think that I'm going to have to go with Marvin here. There is about as much evidence that increasing spending improves education as there is that assault weapon bans reduce crime. Increased spending simply doesn't correlate with better success in learning.

However, no one has addressed the real issue the author of the article brings up which is the way that the left has infiltrated the education departments of our universities (both major and minor) filling our grade schools and secondary schools with liberal ideologue teachers, who pass on the left wing mind set to their students in a self reinforcing feedback loop.

luvalab
01-20-2013, 09:24 AM
...

However, no one has addressed the real issue the author of the article brings up which is the way that the left has infiltrated the education departments of our universities (both major and minor) filling our grade schools and secondary schools with liberal ideologue teachers, who pass on the left wing mind set to their students in a self reinforcing feedback loop.

Okay, I'll address it, sort of...

Common Core as an example is not a strong one, as the curriculum allows teachers to choose whatever texts they want, as long as the skills are taught. Further, although it points out some right-rankling examples, it is also so heavy on the classics and primary documents from the founding fathers and earlier, that I think it can be very balanced.

Now, if the TEACHERS are unbalanced, well... They are either good teachers that teach effectively and challenge students to refute them should their bias annoy--or bad, lazy teachers.

I really don't think left and right is as big a problem as overburdened, burned out, sidetracked by silliness, or just bad.

again--my overpriced two cents.

Gerry Clinchy
01-20-2013, 10:04 AM
Greta, there is no question that reading comprehension is crucial to students becoming informed voters.

If I were being strictly pragmatic, I would say that our real educational problem is with the worst-performing schools. Most of those schools are ones in inner cities. Here in PA, our largest cities have the worst schools: Philadelphia, Harrisburg, Pittsburgh. Here in my local area, the worst-performing school district is in one of our cities, which draws no students outside the city limits, mostly lower-income population. The other two cities consolidated their districts with adjacent suburban townships, so have a more diverse population spanning both high-income and low-income.

The large cities first mentioned have a very serious problem with violence in their schools. I'd say the best way to have the best impact on our educational situation is to improve the performance of the lowest-performing schools; starting with making them safe for the students (and teachers). All the school systems in our area (which is about 700 square miles), probably accounts for fewer students than the city of Philadelphia, all by itself.

In schools like those, they cannot draw enough of the best teachers because teaching there is downright dangerous. And, in those circumstances, even the best teacher would have a hard time. I'm guessing that if the kids in those schools can read at 3rd grade level, that is probably the latest age when teachers were able to control the students enough to teach them.

Maybe the real solution is to examine the schools that perform well, and then apply the precepts to the worst-performing schools in urban settings. That would impact the largest numbers of students who need the improvements most.

Ayres' program for the Chicago school system (which Obama was involved with in administering the funds for) turned out a dismal failure. It did nothing to improve the academic performance of the students. If Arne Duncan is a follower of Ayres, we have a problem right there. Even that Chicago teachers' union president (that we saw on YouTube video) made fun of Arne Duncan as someone capable of running a school system.

Brad Turner
01-20-2013, 12:25 PM
Until we make parents responsible for their children, we will not achieve the national success we seek.

luvalab
01-20-2013, 02:04 PM
Greta, there is no question that reading comprehension is crucial to students becoming informed voters.

If I were being strictly pragmatic, I would say that our real educational problem is with the worst-performing schools. Most of those schools are ones in inner cities. Here in PA, our largest cities have the worst schools: Philadelphia, Harrisburg, Pittsburgh. Here in my local area, the worst-performing school district is in one of our cities, which draws no students outside the city limits, mostly lower-income population. The other two cities consolidated their districts with adjacent suburban townships, so have a more diverse population spanning both high-income and low-income.

The large cities first mentioned have a very serious problem with violence in their schools. I'd say the best way to have the best impact on our educational situation is to improve the performance of the lowest-performing schools; starting with making them safe for the students (and teachers). All the school systems in our area (which is about 700 square miles), probably accounts for fewer students than the city of Philadelphia, all by itself.

In schools like those, they cannot draw enough of the best teachers because teaching there is downright dangerous. And, in those circumstances, even the best teacher would have a hard time. I'm guessing that if the kids in those schools can read at 3rd grade level, that is probably the latest age when teachers were able to control the students enough to teach them.

Maybe the real solution is to examine the schools that perform well, and then apply the precepts to the worst-performing schools in urban settings. That would impact the largest numbers of students who need the improvements most.

Ayres' program for the Chicago school system (which Obama was involved with in administering the funds for) turned out a dismal failure. It did nothing to improve the academic performance of the students. If Arne Duncan is a follower of Ayres, we have a problem right there. Even that Chicago teachers' union president (that we saw on YouTube video) made fun of Arne Duncan as someone capable of running a school system.

I don't disagree with you, Gerry.

I think so much of the problem comes from external factors... And as usual, I'm split between a "right" solution (local control) or a "left" solution (swoop in and fix it all). Trying to do some version of both seems to have led to a vortex of misery. I just don't know.

huntinman
01-20-2013, 02:33 PM
Until we make parents responsible for their children, we will not achieve the national success we seek.

Now that's a novel concept... Short, concise and to the point. I like it.

BonMallari
01-20-2013, 02:53 PM
I along with many on here were a product of the public school system....but the public school systems of today are NOTHING like those of the 60-70's, and I think two major reasons are the parents of today expect the school system to raise their kids, and the inclusion of groups like the ACLU into the disciplinary actions of the school

When I was jr/sr HS we answered to two people...the boys VP or our athletic coaches...the boys VP was usually a sick sadistic jerk who probably got off on paddling young boys...but our athletic coaches demanded and got our respect, becaise for many of us they decided if we got to play on game day...They were are male role models, our second dad's and they put the fear of god in our heads...they were also able to use corporal punishment (something I never experienced nor in favor of) but the threat of its use was enough of a deterrent..

Today's student has no fear of repercussions for their acting up in class, NONE whatsoever..detention, big *deal, but when many of us went to school, you screwed up in class, there was hell to pay later...

The other thing I can not fathom is the elimination of after school activities, besides sports,band,and other wholesome activities, what else did kids of yesteryear do...Nowadays those kids hang out at the malls and get into trouble. We throw money at many problems geared toward minorities only to see them drop out before finishing school, whereas kids that actually finish school could have benefitted from having some financial help are forced to enter the work force at an early age because their parents could not afford to give them the college experience

We waste so much money in education toward feel good programs that reap nothing at all, its criminal

Julie R.
01-20-2013, 02:55 PM
Throwing money at education and adding layers of administrative bureaucracy has done nothing to improve the quality of education in this country. All it's done is promote a dumbing-down of education to the lowest common denominator which benefits no child. And I agree with Brad Turner 100%:


Until we make parents responsible for their children, we will not achieve the national success we seek.

Sadly, it's not possible to regulate who breeds.

huntinman
01-20-2013, 02:56 PM
I along with many on here were a product of the public school system....but the public school systems of today are NOTHING like those of the 60-70's, and I think two major reasons are the parents of today expect the school system to raise their kids, and the inclusion of groups like the ACLU into the disciplinary actions of the school

When I was jr/sr HS we answered to two people...the boys VP or our athletic coaches...the boys VP was usually a sick sadistic jerk who probably got off on paddling young boys...but our athletic coaches demanded and got our respect, becaise for many of us they decided if we got to play on game day...They were are male role models, our second dad's and they put the fear of god in our heads...they were also able to use corporal punishment (something I never experienced nor in favor of) but the threat of its use was enough of a deterrent..

Today's student has no fear of repercussions for their acting up in class, NONE whatsoever..detention, big *deal, but when many of us went to school, you screwed up in class, there was hell to pay later...

The other thing I can not fathom is the elimination of after school activities, besides sports,band,and other wholesome activities, what else did kids of yesteryear do...Nowadays those kids hang out at the malls and get into trouble. We throw money at many problems geared toward minorities only to see them drop out before finishing school, whereas kids that actually finish school could have benefitted from having some financial help are forced to enter the work force at an early age because their parents could not afford to give them the college experience

We waste so much money in education toward feel good programs that reap nothing at all, its criminal

Slam dunk... Right on the money Bon. I'm 54 and have the same memories of my Jr high and high school coaches.

Our football coaches even made us cut our hair if we showed up for practice on the first day with long hair.... Long hair = no play. Strict disciplinarians. We won three straight state championships in HS.

Marvin S
01-20-2013, 05:50 PM
Until we allow charter schools nationwide, eliminate the DoE at the national level & emphasize STEM monetarily, which would include making aid for worthless degrees very hard to get.

I've studied the school thing seriously, as long as we rely on the politicians & the unions to guide the fix, it ain't gonna happen :eek:.




Greta, there is no question that reading comprehension is crucial to students becoming informed voters.

Gerry - please see the top quote - recently I read in a responsible publication this: "The US is the most literate nation in the world, what we do not have is the comprehension level to utilize that skill". You normally attain those skills in the analytical atmosphere.


I along with many on here were a product of the public school system....but the public school systems of today are NOTHING like those of the 60-70's, and I think two major reasons are the parents of today expect the school system to raise their kids, and the inclusion of groups like the ACLU into the disciplinary actions of the school

Today's student has no fear of repercussions for their acting up in class, NONE whatsoever..detention, big *deal, but when many of us went to school, you screwed up in class, there was hell to pay later...

The other thing I can not fathom is the elimination of after school activities, besides sports,band,and other wholesome activities, what else did kids of yesteryear do...Nowadays those kids hang out at the malls and get into trouble. We throw money at many problems geared toward minorities only to see them drop out before finishing school, whereas kids that actually finish school could have benefitted from having some financial help are forced to enter the work force at an early age because their parents could not afford to give them the college experience

I did my schooling in the 30's-40's with higher ed in the 50"s. My time on the SB was the late 70's but have Gkids going now, so still am involved. But teachers/coaches are no different today than they were then. They enjoy their status over the kids & in many cases abuse it. As I told my sons, if the teachers think you are something special I will be concerned. My experience is they are able to promote the losers because they in general are unable to recognize the winners. Ever wonder why the skill positions in sports in general are occupied by the children of public employees? I asked our Super that one time - got the answer that told me I was right.

The reason the ACLU got involved was someone in the school system did something truly stupid, when you do that you lose. But a kid can still receive corporal punishment under very strict guidelines. With the proliferation of "degreed" folks in the system wouldn't you think someone would be smart enough to outsmart the wiseacre in the class :confused:. When a kid acts up it is in general because they are bored.

As for kids hanging out, if that it happening the parents relinquished their responsibilities long before the kids were teenagers. If any of you think things are different today than they were in the old days you have another think coming - the Flapper era was not about responsibliity. The nation was lucky enough to have the Great Depression to right the ship.

There are more pressures on child rearing than those created through the stupidity of the educational bureaucracy. I worked for wages from the time I was 9 years old.


Throwing money at education and adding layers of administrative bureaucracy has done nothing to improve the quality of education in this country. All it's done is promote a dumbing-down of education to the lowest common denominator which benefits no child.

Sadly, it's not possible to regulate who breeds.

When I grew up we had country schools in the center of every 4 x 4 set of sections, taught by HS grads who generally chosen for their skills but educated at the most for 30 weeks in normal schools. We had a County Superintendent who would show about twice a year. There was not extra pay for every duty.

In our little school there would be from 17 to 25 kids (all grades) taught in open concept. The teacher stoked the fire, made sure there was a bucket of water for drinking & washing, communal dipper & washpan :) & taught us well. Myself & my two class mates from the 6th grade all went on to Engineering degrees, Mining, Civil & a PHD in Geological Engineering after a stint in Venezuela as a geologist. Both he & his sister died of cancer before they reached 60 which today I find ??????.

We have paid more into these systems & received less for years. That's why I say charter schools, an emphasis on STEM & a de-emphasis of feel good degrees will right the ship to some degree.

There is no sane way to regulate who breeds (wasn't that Adolf's thing?) but proper lawmaking can place the carrot in a position that it requires accomplishment to attain it :cool:.

BonMallari
01-20-2013, 06:14 PM
Slam dunk... Right on the money Bon. I'm 54 and have the same memories of my Jr high and high school coaches.

Our football coaches even made us cut our hair if we showed up for practice on the first day with long hair.... Long hair = no play. Strict disciplinarians. We won three straight state championships in HS.

Hair cuts were the first ritual of the fall, separated the jocks from the rest of the student body....many of my coaches doubled as my shop teachers, history teachers, so there was no such thing as messing around in class..the other teachers had no problem reporting you to your coach if you acted up in class...

heck even gym class went a long way into building us into young men, guys like me that were soft mama's boys learned to grow a pair and actually became an athlete....I credit my coaches with being the biggest influence in shaping me to be a young man, they taught me to be gracious in defeat and humble when we won, back on a time where we actually shook hands with our opponents, not just some fist bump or fake slap high five

Thomas D
01-20-2013, 07:14 PM
An editorial regarding SOME educators in the school systems.

http://econfaculty.gmu.edu/wew/articles/13/DishonestEducators.htm

Brad Turner
01-20-2013, 07:37 PM
Throwing money at education and adding layers of administrative bureaucracy has done nothing to improve the quality of education in this country. All it's done is promote a dumbing-down of education to the lowest common denominator which benefits no child. And I agree with Brad Turner 100%:



Sadly, it's not possible to regulate who breeds.

No, but we could tie welfare, food stamps, etc. to things like attendance and/or performance.

road kill
01-20-2013, 07:37 PM
All makes for nice reading.
Here are some facts boys and girls.
The public school systems in the cities of America are some of the most wasteful over spending in all of government.
The cost per pupil is staggering versus the rest of the states educational spending in those states with the larger cities with large urban populations.
That genie will not be put back into the bottle.

The "Monarchy" that is created in these cities is not going to be removed.
And who supports this "Monarchy??

Sorry, just the cold hard facts!!!

Buzz
01-20-2013, 08:00 PM
Until we make parents responsible for their children, we will not achieve the national success we seek.

This is the key here. A big part of the reason I am glad I'm not a teacher. I see too many pointing the finger at them. I see too many making excuses for their kids. More need to look in the mirror.

sick lids
01-20-2013, 09:59 PM
The public school systems in the cities of America are some of the most wasteful over spending in all of government.


I got invited to a MPS luncheon to discuss small business hiring needs. From the time I walked in to the time I left all I could think of was if these people were working for me I'd stop at a gas station at the end of the day and ask them to get me a soda. Then drive off as soon as they closed the door. I wouldn't doubt that there was 3 people in the system for every teacher spending the day drinking Starbucks and milking the clock. And the lunch was ridiculously over done show boat style. Reminded me of drug reps buying a whole facility lunch for a few minutes of a Dr.'s ear.:confused: