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View Full Version : farmer and Monsanto and soybean seed



charly_t
02-18-2013, 11:03 PM
http://ideas.time.com/2013/02/18/is-it-a-crime-to-plant-a-seed/

This week this case goes to court.

Dpage
02-19-2013, 06:57 AM
Sad and disgusting on so many levels...including the fact that the Roundup Ready seeds are being used to feed livestock.

Pete
02-19-2013, 08:29 AM
Roughly 40 percent of the food grown now is genetically modified in some way. Most have a "terminator gene" which can be attached to a regular plant through pollination making its seed sterile. Check out the fruit in the grocery store. It doesn't rot like the fruit on my tree's. It shrivels up and dries out instead of getting mushy. My fruit off my trees doesn't last very long,, but I had plums that I forgot about for about 6 months and it was still viable ,,same with the tomatoes which were the first fruit to be experimented on. They last forever and shrivel. That can't be good for people.
The reason is not to feed the masses with food that lasts ,,,it is just the opposite. That crap will cause problems down the road. and it gives Monsanto a monopoly on seed.
That means if you want to grow food you will have to get seed from monsanto,,just to grow food that can eventually kill you.

Can you see the plan coming together now.

achiro
02-19-2013, 08:43 AM
Yep, farmers use to be able to keep seed from this years crop to plant next. That's pretty much a thing of the past. A documentary called Food inc. does a decent job of showing how all of this goes down. Worth a watch if you have the time.

achiro
02-19-2013, 08:44 AM
It seems weird to me that countries like Russia have outlawed GMO's while the US has shown very little interest in even talking about the subject.

mngundog
02-19-2013, 09:47 AM
To add some insight when you buy round-up ready soy beans, you sign a licensing agreement with the seed company saying you will not replant the seeds, or sell them as a seed crop. Every farmer knows about it, this is a farmer that is testing the the patent law, not some poor innocent guy who knew nothing about it.

luvalab
02-19-2013, 10:02 AM
Roughly 40 percent of the food grown now is genetically modified in some way. Most have a "terminator gene" which can be attached to a regular plant through pollination making its seed sterile. Check out the fruit in the grocery store. It doesn't rot like the fruit on my tree's. It shrivels up and dries out instead of getting mushy. My fruit off my trees doesn't last very long,, but I had plums that I forgot about for about 6 months and it was still viable ,,same with the tomatoes which were the first fruit to be experimented on. They last forever and shrivel. That can't be good for people.
The reason is not to feed the masses with food that lasts ,,,it is just the opposite. That crap will cause problems down the road. and it gives Monsanto a monopoly on seed.
That means if you want to grow food you will have to get seed from monsanto,,just to grow food that can eventually kill you.

Can you see the plan coming together now.

I always assumed this was from irradiating the food and killing all the stuff that naturally leads to decay.

(I agree it can't be good, though.)

mjh345
02-19-2013, 10:04 AM
The smart money should be on Monsanto on this case

achiro
02-19-2013, 10:54 AM
The smart money should be on Monsanto on this case
Yes if I were a betting man.

charly_t
02-19-2013, 12:06 PM
To add some insight when you buy round-up ready soy beans, you sign a licensing agreement with the seed company saying you will not replant the seeds, or sell them as a seed crop. Every farmer knows about it, this is a farmer that is testing the the patent law, not some poor innocent guy who knew nothing about it.

Read what the farmer actually says that he did. He did not violate the agreement that he signed.

On another note this is why I still keep some of my Dad's field corn going. Getting too old to keep it up though.

mngundog
02-19-2013, 12:19 PM
Read what the farmer actually says that he did. He did not violate the agreement that he signed.

On another note this is why I still keep some of my Dad's field corn going. Getting too old to keep it up though.
A photo of that farmers field would be worth 1000 words.

duckheads
02-19-2013, 12:28 PM
He went to the local grain elevator and bought the soybeans that are normaly used for feed and other uses not seed. He did not violate his agreement with Monsanto as he didn't save or reuse the seed from his crop.

Comes down to the patent rights of Monsanto and if or when those patent rights end.

HPL
02-19-2013, 01:20 PM
I would think that if one really wanted to get around the regs (without having actually read them) one could plant alternating rows of Monsanto's product and someone else's allowing cross pollination. One might then be able to argue that the resulting seeds no longer had the genetic makeup of the Monsanto product.

BonMallari
02-19-2013, 01:32 PM
Does anybody remember the old ride/exhibit at Disneyland, about the ride to the future presented by Monsanto ?

remember when they were the original producers of "astro turf"

mngundog
02-19-2013, 01:37 PM
I would think that if one really wanted to get around the regs (without having actually read them) one could plant alternating rows of Monsanto's product and someone else's allowing cross pollination. One might then be able to argue that the resulting seeds no longer had the genetic makeup of the Monsanto product.
Don't remember the case but I believe that one has already been attempted about 4-5 years ago, I believe the crop was canola and the farmer lost.