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Thread: My Dogs First Hunt

  1. #1

    Default My Dogs First Hunt

    Fellas,

    I have gotten invited to a dove hunt on opening day, I know its going to be hot and may put a toll on my dog. I have been working him alot in the evenings to get him ready for duck season and opening day for dove will be his first hunt, but we are going to start the shoot in mid day. Do you guys have any advice on keeping my boy cool? I plan on bring and bowl and lots of water and find a shady spot for us.

  2. #2
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    Leave him home : )

  3. #3
    Senior Member bjoiner's Avatar
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    I don't ever take my dogs to opening day. It's just way too hot and not worth the risk.

    I have seen people bring a big bag of ice for the dog to lay on.
    Bubba Joiner

    HRCH UH Ridgewood's Georgia Dawg (500 point club)
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    Hope She's A Duk Dawg

  4. #4

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    Thanks for the advice

    As much as I would love to show him off, the last thing I want to do is hurt him. The guy that owns the farm invited me and told me to bring my dog that he has heard all about. This same guy has a MH and said that his dog was going to be with him too.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Tom. P.'s Avatar
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    I will never take my dog on another dove hunt unless there's a pond really close.Last year it was hot as always when dive hunting. I took a five gallon jug of water and that wasn't enough. Trying to cool him off was just to hard. Then when he got cooled off the heat of the day was like a sauna for him
    So never again. Did I mention the mouthful of feathers a dog gets with a dove? So he's hot and a mouthful of feathers making it harder to breathe = a disaster for your dog.
    You asked for advice and as hard as it is not to hunt your pup think twice before you do.
    I ended up carrying my dog to the truck kicking myself all the way.
    We got him cooled off and he was fine but I learned a value able lesson that day.

  6. #6
    Senior Member roseberry's Avatar
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    take him and leave him in the truck until you lack two or three birds for your limit. get him out later when it is cooler, less frantic and you are willing to control the situation. shoot and allow him to pick up the last of your limit and hunt up a few your buddies couldn't find.
    john mccallie

  7. #7
    Senior Member David McCracken's Avatar
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    I take a camo umbrella and a 12 volt fan that I run off the battery on my 4-wheeler. If you don't have a 4-wheeler with you, the umbrella will help a bunch. Let him dig a hole beside your stool to lay in also.
    Try not to send him into real thick cover, like standing sorgum or soy beans where there is no air moving underneath. If it's bright and hot, I usually wait until around 3:30-4:00 to go into the field.
    Carolina American Water Spaniels

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    Senior Member Gary Southall's Avatar
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    Wait and hunt later in the day. Nothing hardly flying at noon anyway.

  9. #9
    Senior Member krazybronco2's Avatar
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    and if you do leave the dog in the truck till later in the afternoon make sure you park in spot that will be shady most of the day with plenty of ventalation and water. also wouldnt hurt to take a few frozen bottles of water(2 liter or half gallon bottles) in the crate/dogbox just to have something cool to lay on or against. a kennel fan pushing air over the frozen bottle should keep your dog cool as long as you change the bottles every couple of hours.

    i do have done this when we have training days in the early summer and dog is panting a little when i pull her out but nothing to bad.
    Last edited by krazybronco2; 08-27-2013 at 02:37 PM.

  10. #10
    Senior Member RookieTrainer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by krazybronco2 View Post
    and if you do leave the dog in the truck till later in the afternoon make sure you park in spot that will be shady most of the day with plenty of ventalation and water. also wouldnt hurt to take a few frozen bottles of water(2 liter or half gallon bottles) in the crate/dogbox just to have something cool to lay on or against. a kennel fan pushing air over the frozen bottle should keep your dog cool as long as you change the bottles every couple of hours.

    i do have done this when we have training days in the early summer and dog is panting a little when i pull her out but nothing to bad.
    Good call on the frozen water bottles.

    Nobody mentioned that if you take the dog it would probably be a good idea to leave your shotgun at home and plan on concentrating on your dog's behavior. Get somebody else to sit with you and shoot, but you work the dog. Outside of some health issue due to the heat, the worst thing you could do would be to let the dog learn that hunting = no rules. If you have a really birdy dog, a tie-out stake might be a really good idea. A lead would probably be good too, as rules sometimes go out the window when you get to a new place and that exciting of an environment.

    Remember, those birds are yours unless and until you decide to release the dog. And he has to come when you call, no matter what. Keep your dog in a situation where he can't do otherwise and you will be miles ahead down the road.

    Now if I could just turn back the clock two years and use all that hard-earned knowledge . . . .
    Steve Wyatt

    HR Belle's Rolling Big Rig "Jimmy"

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