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Thread: What does Pro Training for Hunt Tests Involve and Where to Start?

  1. #11
    Member Cal99's Avatar
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    THANK YOU to everyone who took the time to reply, I really appreciate all your comments and GREAT advice!! I'm gonna make this happen

  2. #12
    Senior Member Socks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cal99 View Post
    Not new to lab owning, but new to the world of hunt tests. This is our third awesome field lab (13 weeks), and finally the time and pedigree is on our side to actually think that maybe we can get her titled. Since we are novices, I am guessing that we would be best to go with a pro trainer, even though my husband hunts and had the other two trained fairly well. Where do we even begin? At what age? What does pro training entail? Will a pro evaluate your dog and give an opinion if it is even feasible to title your dog? Starting my research early so that we can make the right choices. Live in Eastern Michigan, thanks for your help!!!
    If you want PM me and I can give you a couple of names for you start your research.
    Joe Dickerson

    R.I.P. 4xGMPR HRCH Hunters Marsh Jack Daniels Bubba Jazz MH
    Call Name: JD

  3. #13
    Senior Member BJGatley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cal99 View Post
    Not new to lab owning, but new to the world of hunt tests. This is our third awesome field lab (13 weeks), and finally the time and pedigree is on our side to actually think that maybe we can get her titled. Since we are novices, I am guessing that we would be best to go with a pro trainer, even though my husband hunts and had the other two trained fairly well. Where do we even begin? At what age? What does pro training entail? Will a pro evaluate your dog and give an opinion if it is even feasible to title your dog? Starting my research early so that we can make the right choices. Live in Eastern Michigan, thanks for your help!!!
    Bonding is soooo important right now....Spend all of your attention on that. Think in term of baby steps for now and then have your young dog be evaluated by a pro or an experienced amateur.....

  4. #14
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    Great question
    I am a relatively new handler. My wife has been training and handling with a pro handler for the past couple of years. She has amassed a great amount of knowledge and I thought I had learned a lot through watching and helping. I knew nothing. By training with others, going to hunt tests and developing a partnership with my dog, we have had much success as an amateur.
    Regarding using a pro, I have learned more from watching pro handlers at hunt tests than almost anything else. Unfortunately, when I first watched the pros, I really did not have enough training / handling knowledge to understand what their details in handling were. As my Chessie and I have progressed together, I have gained a better appreciation for some particular pros and their methods. For me, the journey through training and partnering with my dog is worth as much as getting titles. The titles are just confirmation that we have met the requirements of passing the standards.
    I do not see dogs as machines being "programmed" to become a master hunter. It takes a partnership between dog and handler to meet the challenge. I see some very good pros getting the titles then returning the dogs to their owners. I cannot help but believe that something is missed between the owner and dog by leaving the training to a pro. Now, going to training seminars and private sessions with pros seem an excellent option. Both handler and dog get the experience and knowledge of the pro but the owner gets to develop the relationship needed to get your wanted titles.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Backwater View Post
    Join a club most areas have clubs with good members which will help you learn. I started from nothing with my first dog two years ago. I used videos, asked everyone and sorted out what I thought would work, and then put my time in. Time will tell but I started with a bitch out of a NFC and FC and she is doing it. I have learned much, and despite my short comings as a trainer, we are 4/4 senior test and should finish up this title this weekend. Then on the MH and hopefully QAA. Unless you have the money to leave the dog on a pro truck and cheer from the sidelines you should learn yourself. I find the training the most rewarding part of this whole game. Good luck
    This times 1000.....I just love spending time with my dog! I've used a trainer where the intersection of my bank account and my time allotment allowed (which isn't very often). Join a local retriever club and spend some time with your husband and the dog and some new friends training and the rewards will be more than you can imagine!

  6. #16
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    90% of the problems I have seen comes from the breeding. A good, well bred dog seems to overcome the trainer, the issues, and everything else. If the intense desire to retrieve before anything else in life is there from the parents, the training becomes fun. I am a new at this, I did the research and bought the best bred dog I could find. I looked at who wins, been at it awhile, and had years of experience in the winning circles of field trials. I spend the money on a very good pup. Now the training has bee easy and fun. I have had very few issues with her and all were corrected through asking and seeking advise of those who know. Force to the pile became an issue of her breaking to the pile! Going has never been a problem. Force breaking was a piece of cake. Blind work is something I look forward to at any hunt test or trial. She loves to go and runs her blinds as hard or harder then marks, kicking dirt in my face when told back. It has been fun.

    Maybe I got lucky?? I don't think so, the entire litter is doing it. I just think many under estimate the genetic part to this game.

    "This ain't Burger King, you don't get it your way"


    Backwater's Ole' Crow Medicine Show SH "Raven" BLF 7/26/11 (NFC FC AFC Hunter's Run Boo Boo x AFC Beat The Rush)
    Backwater's Gun Powder 'N' Lead "Trigger" BLF 6/30/12 ( FC AFC CJ's Mister T x FC Queen Winhelmina of the Netherlands)
    Backwater's Biker Trash "Scooter" BLM 9/6/2013 (FC AFC Nick of Time Lone Ranger x Good Ideas Windy Retreezer QAA)

  7. #17
    Senior Member Buzz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBSpears View Post
    Regarding using a pro, I have learned more from watching pro handlers at hunt tests than almost anything else. Unfortunately, when I first watched the pros, I really did not have enough training / handling knowledge to understand what their details in handling were.

    Have you watched Dave Rorem's Handling DVD?


    Quote Originally Posted by Backwater View Post
    She loves to go and runs her blinds as hard or harder then marks, kicking dirt in my face when told back. It has been fun.


    I have one of those. I find that the dogs that run really hard on blinds are hard to run blinds with. You need to have really good timing with the whistle.
    Last edited by Buzz; 09-04-2013 at 06:02 PM.
    "For everyone to whom much is given, of him shall much be required." -- Luke 12:48

    Raven - Moneybird's Black Magic Marker***
    (Esprit's Power Play x Trumarc's Lean Cuisine)
    Mick - Moneybird's Jumpin' Jack Flash***
    (Clubmead's Road Warrior x Oakdale Whitewater Devil Dog)
    Peerless - Moneybird's Sole Survivor
    (Two River's Lucky Willie x Moneybird's Black Magic Marker)

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buzz View Post
    Have you watched Dave Rorem's Handling DVD?




    I have one of those. I find that the dogs that run really hard on blinds are hard to run blinds with. You need to have really good timing with the whistle.
    I would agree with this. She is so fast that if you are not on top of your game she is past the blind before you know it, however......... I will not ever feed one who doesn't run this way. I know some may not care for this type of dog and I get it, but I want horsepower under the hood. I love the Ranger dog, fast hard driving dogs. I need this because nothing is sweeter in my world then a dog going a hundred miles an hour out 300 yards after completing a triple prior. Heart, drive, guts, as my ol" man used to say to me when watching the Packers. He was crazy about those darn packers!!!

    "This ain't Burger King, you don't get it your way"


    Backwater's Ole' Crow Medicine Show SH "Raven" BLF 7/26/11 (NFC FC AFC Hunter's Run Boo Boo x AFC Beat The Rush)
    Backwater's Gun Powder 'N' Lead "Trigger" BLF 6/30/12 ( FC AFC CJ's Mister T x FC Queen Winhelmina of the Netherlands)
    Backwater's Biker Trash "Scooter" BLM 9/6/2013 (FC AFC Nick of Time Lone Ranger x Good Ideas Windy Retreezer QAA)

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