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Thread: Field Trial Dog Life

  1. #21
    Senior Member blackasmollases's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by john fallon View Post
    Life "on the truck" is a hard life for dogs.
    To arrive at this, I wouldn't compare it to the life of a common house pet, I'd compare it to life with the accompanying 24/7 interaction of the dogs of a retired two or three dog A list amature who trains and campaigns their own uncommon house pets all year............

    Were I selling a litter, I would factor this into my decisions about placement

    john


    I'm. Very new to all this but I believe it is harder on the owner than the dog. After numerous visits and seeing the dog jump in the truck like it was the best place in the world. And then almost jump through the collar when it was his turn, makes me realize I'm doing the right thing. Every dog is different though.
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  2. #22
    Senior Member John Robinson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pcarpenter View Post
    If Coach Saban was the most successful Pop Warner coach of all time and his players loved him and went on to lead happy, productive lives is that of less value than running a successful business (ie, coaching a Top 10 Div 1 sport)?

    I certainly agree, FT bred dogs are not for a normal family. However, your comment about "bragging rights ... generating more money" kind of makes my point. To some this is a business first.

    I respect your opinion (honestly). I'm new here and to Field Trials. I honestly want to know what people think and to gain more insight.
    I am a hard core field trailer, have two all age dogs right now, I train hard and run a lot of trials, but my dogs live in the house, sleep on the bed and are hunted every year from October to January. My dogs through their competitive life spend months at a time with a pro, especially during the winter when I cant train or run them up here in Montana. Many amateurs I know train year around, travel from trial to trial with their travel trailer and dogs like a nomad, I think the dogs they own believe they died and went to heaven, the get to work every day doing what they love and they get to live with mom and dad.

    I think breeders want the best for their dogs, but they want the dog to be trained and campaigned by a serious amateur, someone with knowledge and resources to give the dog a great life and a good shot at being successful in the field trial game. That doesn't mean they want their pups to go live on a pro truck their whole life.

    John

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by john fallon View Post
    Life "on the truck" is a hard life for dogs
    This was my point. I think most of you missed the question I asked. Who has a better life, a dog from FT stock that is trained, lives with a family and swims/runs/retrieves every day (ie, what they want to do) or a FT dog that competes in high stakes. I'm honestly curious.

    I'm not making a statement about any breeder's decision where he places his pups. That's his/her perogative. I simply stated SOME want their dogs to compete to further their Kennel (ie, build their business). I've had two FT dogs that lived with the family and hunted with me - high powered dogs that got plenty of exercise, attention and love. These dogs didn't get the breeder any bragging rights but they were happy pups that lived great lives
    Last edited by pcarpenter; 09-09-2013 at 10:51 AM.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Scott Adams's Avatar
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    IMO dogs that spend a few months of the year with a pro are having an acceptable quality of life, that may result in an exceptional quality of life for the handler/owner & dog, later in the year. I think the dogs on Pro trucks are happy. Their performance would be the greatest measure. The dog that doesn't go to a pro, but enjoys the same quality FT training & career, while being a part of the family, is to me, the best life of all.
    The worst life is the one that gets left in a back yard kennel until hunting season, and then goes wild.
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  5. #25
    Senior Member Russ's Avatar
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    Field trial oriented breeders are breeding for field trial success. Trialers tend to be goal oriented. Their number one goal in breeding is producing competitive field trial dogs, not putting a dog in the very happiest home possible.

    In the past we have had dogs on pro trucks and they seemed very happy. They bonded with the pro, loved their work and socialized with other dogs in their small airing groups. The dogs with good pros run with their tails up and enjoy their lives.

    Like John, our dogs run all age stakes and live in the house. The working dogs spend most of their time sleeping when not working. A field trial training schedule keeps them tired out but they still get excited about getting out to train five or six days a week.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Moose Mtn's Avatar
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    I will add a little perspective to the quality of life theory.

    My Young dog, Star, is in training in Texas... (a long way from Colorado) with the breeder of her litter. We have owned high drive dogs before, and know how to work and use them so that they are happy.

    We got star as an 8week old pup and had her thru 6.5 months. She was doing great at our little puppy school.. waiting to be sent on her name, and doing some pretty long weater and land retrieves. at 6.5 months, we hauled her back to Texas.

    My little princess who slept on my side of the bed, and had to be woken up each morning, telling her to GET OUT OF BED!

    When we delivered her to the trainer, it was heartbreaking.. she was MY girl, and I fell apart leaving her... poor Star.. she would miss her bed, and her trips to the barn, and out to the lakes for her play time.

    We waited 3 months before we scheduled a visit. She was happy as a clam to see us.. Genuinley knew who we were.

    But she had changed... The trainer let her stay with us in bed during our visit... but instead of wanting to cuddle each morning... she knew it was time to go to work.. She beat us awake, and was looking out the window as if to say "Lets go! Another day of School YEA!"

    We have visited a few times, and she definitley LOVES us.. but the trainer is her BEST FRIEND and mentor. She lives to get on that dang dog truck each morning.

    While it initially burst my bubble that she wanted to go find Dan, instead of cuddling with me.. The realization that she is truly happy in her training life makes it alright with me.

    No she does not have a couch, and she acts like all the other crazy fools barking and acting out in a kennel... but she is in her element...

    So Where I am going with all of this... Is that I dont think, in the mind of a good student in training... that the kennel/training lifestyle is all that awful!
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  7. #27
    Senior Member firehouselabs's Avatar
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    If you don't open the door fast enough, my dog will jump onto the dog trailer. When people say "lives on the truck", really- how many dogs truly LIVE in the truck, only taken out to air and train? All the pros that I know kennel the dogs starting at 6pm where they can stretch, relax, eat and drink, and sleep until they are aired and put on the truck at @ 6:00am. That's twelve hours NOT on a truck right there. Add the time when they are staked out, UNDER the truck or trailer, airing, roading, or training, they spend less time ON the truck then I do sitting in the office.
    At least they are doing it for fun!!!!
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  8. #28
    Senior Member DoubleHaul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by firehouselabs View Post
    If you don't open the door fast enough, my dog will jump onto the dog trailer. When people say "lives on the truck", really- how many dogs truly LIVE in the truck, only taken out to air and train? All the pros that I know kennel the dogs starting at 6pm where they can stretch, relax, eat and drink, and sleep until they are aired and put on the truck at @ 6:00am. That's twelve hours NOT on a truck right there. Add the time when they are staked out, UNDER the truck or trailer, airing, roading, or training, they spend less time ON the truck then I do sitting in the office.
    At least they are doing it for fun!!!!
    I have one that as long as it is not too hot would prefer to spend his day in the dog truck. He will bug you until you put him in his hole and then stay there all day, much happier than in the house, until he decides it is about time for dinner.

  9. #29
    Senior Member BBnumber1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pcarpenter View Post
    This was my point. I think most of you missed the question I asked. Who has a better life, a dog from FT stock that is trained, lives with a family and swims/runs/retrieves every day (ie, what they want to do) or a FT dog that competes in high stakes. I'm honestly curious.
    I think that there is a fundamental flaw in your question. This is not an either/or situation.

    There are dogs that are never trained, and are left in the back yard, with little family interaction.

    There are dogs that are trained minimally, lives with a family and are ignored most of the time except during hunting season.

    There are dogs that are trained, live with a family and swim/run/retrieve every day AND compete in trials or hunt tests.

    There are dogs that spend a few months or years with a pro and then come home to a family, and are trained and trial/tested from then on by the amatuer

    There are dogs that spend half the year with a pro, and half a year at home with a family, running trials or hunt tests both with the pro and with the amatuer.

    There are dogs with pros, that spend half a year on the truck, and half a year with a kennel every night, because the pro travels south/north.

    There are dogs with pros, that just train and run trials/tests, and never see an "owner", just the pro trainer.

    This does not even go into the wide range of treatment/interaction that a dog can receive whether it is with a pro, or with an amatuer trainer or with a family.

    I think there is no way to really answer your question of which has the best life, because there is too large a spectrum of circumstances. I think that at least some breeders ask a multitude of questions, trying to make sure that their dogs end up in the kind of home they want their dogs to be in. Some are more concerned about 'Performance homes' some are more interested in 'Active homes', some in 'caring homes'
    Last edited by BBnumber1; 09-09-2013 at 05:23 PM.
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  10. #30
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    Well stated BBnumber1.

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