The RetrieverTraining.Net Forums The Retriever Academy
Total Retriever Training with Mike Lardy
Hawkeye Media Gunners Up Tritronics Gun Dog Broker
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 42

Thread: Field Trial Dog Life Part 2

  1. #11
    Senior Member John Lash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Pittsburgh, Pa.
    Posts
    1,855

    Default

    What everyone else has said. It's the quality. Pros spend a lot of time doing the right thing.

    Dogs sit around a lot between sessions but I think that's part of the learning experience. Too many dogs at home are doing things that are fun to them on their own. At the pros or even when we are training them their fun is training. Waiting between sessions makes the session more important to them, in my opinion. Many times it's a good idea to crate a dog for hours before you go to train. If you come home from work ready to train and the dog has been chasing squirrels or playing with the kids all day your planned force to pile session doesn't have much appeal.

    You can do a lot on your own, but a dog has only so much energy and attention span so if you're doing multiple dogs or you're with a group it's one thing, one dog on your own you're both waiting between sessions. If you're traveling a distance to train it's very hard.

    I agree that a pro can easily do 3-4 times as much as someone can on their own in the same time period.. They are also good at evaluating what a dog needs and where it is and how far it can go in training at the higher levels.
    Last edited by John Lash; 09-11-2013 at 04:00 PM.
    John Lash

    "If you run Field Trials, you learn to swallow your disappointment quickly."

    "Field trials are not a game for good dogs. They're for great dogs with great training." E. Graham

  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Fort Atkinson, WI
    Posts
    264

    Default

    questions to ask yourself
    can you train on very high quality land/water every day
    does this training involve different quality land and water every day
    do you have the help to throw a quad or triple every day
    do you have the expertise to respond immediately to a problem - this means a whistle or nick as needed with precise timing
    do you have a live bird shooter than can ride birds out and give a clean kill
    do you have a bird thrower that can clear the skyline]
    does you bird thrower know how to help a dog

    just saying many things go into the equation
    trog
    trog

  3. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Justin Allen View Post
    How would he know, he wasn't there. Probably aired 3-4 times, on and off the truck a few times, in and out of the kennel, etc. The same things dogs do anywhere. If your heart can't take knowing your dog isint sleeping on the couch all day long then maybe you should buy a mini horse. They are dogs, not children and they are very adaptable. I have a dog that has spent a total of about 9 months with a pro. If he could talk he would say its much more fun over there in Georgia. I get trained 5 days a week, 3 times a day and sleep the rest of the time. At my house he sleeps more and trains less.

    Is that what he would say? Maybe it is. Maybe it isn't. You sure as hell can't read his mind. Do mini-horses sleep on couches?

    I'm not against sending a dog to a pro. I'm sending my dog to one. Work on your reading comp rather than making wise a$$ comments

  4. #14
    Senior Member BonMallari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    LV/CenTex/Idaho
    Posts
    12,062

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GW10 View Post
    I started thinking about my question last night and had only read up to about post 30 on the original thread. After reading the rest of the thread I can see how some may take this as stirring the pot. That really is not my intention. I have a four month old pup from a FT breeding that I am considering sending to a trainer vs training myself. I have trained multiple dogs but not to FT levels and I know that I would be potentially holding him back. With three kids and a wife, he is a family member and gets way too much attention.

    I am sincerely curious as to how much time daily a trainer spends with each dog
    .
    here was the timeline when I spent a couple of days throwing birds for a well respected pro earlier this spring...pro had a full truck/trailer with about 15-20 dogs, 2 assistants and 3+/- owners attending..typical Mon/Tues schedule with a Fri-Sun trial ahead

    7-8 am: asst. aired dogs, any females in heat were aired elsewhere

    8am sharp : set up being done ,gunners given instructions, blanks,chairs and birds set up

    8:30 - land triple thrown, assistants or owners continually bring dogs to the line, older AA dogs first, younger dogs last, only stop to rebird or bring in one of the owners to run their dog

    10:30- change location

    11:00 - water triple with/blind- same rotation AA dogs first

    no break for lunch, eat out in the field or on the go . We usually finished about 2:30-3 and called it a day,where dogs were aired again and fed. Same type of schedule the following day except flyers shot,Dogs given Wed off and then flyers shot again with blind work on Thurs

    a pro with a smaller truck may get more setups done depending on if they have the luxury of an assistant, a quad, and or clients attending..YMMV
    All my Exes live in Texas

    Quote Originally Posted by lanse brown View Post
    A few things that I learned still ring true. "Lanse when you get a gift, say thank you and walk away. When you get a screwing walk away. You are going to get a lot more screwings than gifts"

  5. #15
    Senior Member Brent McDowell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Arlington, TN
    Posts
    299

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by John Lash View Post
    What everyone else has said. It's the quality. Pros spend a lot of time doing the right thing.

    Dogs sit around a lot between sessions but I think that's part of the learning experience. Too many dogs at home are doing things that are fun to them on their own. At the pros or even when we are training them their fun is training. Waiting between sessions makes the session more important to them, in my opinion. Many times it's a good idea to crate a dog for hours before you go to train. If you come home from work ready to train and the dog has been chasing squirrels or playing with the kids all day your planned force to pile session doesn't have much appeal.

    You can do a lot on your own, but a dog has only so much energy and attention span so if you're doing multiple dogs or you're with a group it's one thing, one dog on your own you're both waiting between sessions. If you're traveling a distance to train it's very hard.

    I agree that a pro can easily do 3-4 times as much as someone can on their own in the same time period.. They are also good at evaluating what a dog needs and where it is and how far it can go in training at the higher levels.
    Very well said! X2!
    Brent McDowell

    "To be the best, you gotta beat the best - WOOOOOO!!!"

    Jake's Pintail Hunter - Jake
    HR April's Yellow Daisy JH - Daisy
    Knob Creek's Rough Rider*** - Rex
    Knob Creek's Straight Outta Compton - Cali

    www.knobcreekretrievers.com
    www.facebook.com/knobcreekretrievers

  6. #16
    Senior Member duk4me's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    NE Texas
    Posts
    2,877

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pcarpenter View Post
    Is that what he would say? Maybe it is. Maybe it isn't. You sure as hell can't read his mind. Do mini-horses sleep on couches?

    I'm not against sending a dog to a pro. I'm sending my dog to one. Work on your reading comp rather than making wise a$$ comments
    Yes, yes they do sleep on couches.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    I have learned I need these dogs much more than they need me. Tim Bockmon

  7. #17
    Senior Member polmaise's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Stirling Scotland
    Posts
    716

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GW10 View Post
    The Field Trial Dog Life thread got me thinking and raised a question. I have never used a trainer / pro but my question is....how much time (daily) do pros spend with each dog on their truck in training? I am just curious how that time spent correlates with the time I spend on daily training with my dog.

    Thanks

    GW

    Sometimes they learn a lot doing nothing?...

    One Shooter One Spaniel One Retriever

  8. #18
    Senior Member RookieTrainer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    West Central AL
    Posts
    1,108

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pcarpenter View Post
    What did your dog do for the other 23.5 hrs each day?
    Aired, rode around, got used to being around several dogs (basically a perpetual test environment), ran setups, including flyers that I cannot do with any regularity, lounged around on the chain gang, and got some really good training in much cooler weather than we were having here. Had he stayed here, there probably would have been several mornings where we struggled to get anything done because of the heat. Plus I don't have any water I can get to during the week, and he was in the water a majority of his days up north during the summer.

    Other than futzing around with me at night, he didn't miss much. He already stays in a crate during the day while my wife and I work, so that was no real big change for him. It was probably much harder on my wife and I missing him than it was on him. I did it because I love the dog and I wanted him to have the chance to be as successful as his talent and makeup would allow him to be. YMMV.

    BTW, I know Justin and he probably could come pretty close to reading my mind. And he's a pretty good dog trainer to boot.
    Steve Wyatt

    HR Belle's Rolling Big Rig "Jimmy"

  9. #19
    Senior Member John Lash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Pittsburgh, Pa.
    Posts
    1,855

    Default

    Another thing you "get for free" using a Pro. Your dog knows how to be a dog. It knows how to interact with other dogs and maybe the most important to ignore other dogs going to the line and when on honor.

    They get tied out and learn to relax in an exciting situation. They see drag back every day, a couple times a day.

    And a lot of other things that you'd need 20 dogs to replicate.
    John Lash

    "If you run Field Trials, you learn to swallow your disappointment quickly."

    "Field trials are not a game for good dogs. They're for great dogs with great training." E. Graham

  10. #20
    Senior Member Bruce MacPherson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Jewell, Ore
    Posts
    1,210

    Default

    Was the original intent of the poster trying to juxtapose the amount of time dog is actually training with a pro to what the pro is charging? In which case these pros are making way to much money, except it doesn't work that way. If I were in the market the main things on my mind would be, assuming the dog has talent needed, what are my expectations for this dog. Do I have the time, resources, knowledge and temperament needed to get this dog where I want to go in a time frame acceptable to myself. If I decide that bringing a trainer into the mix will help me achieve my objective then there is a whole separate list of criteria and way way down the list is the actual time spent with my dog.
    "The longer you let a dog go in the wrong direction the more they think they are going in the right direction" Don Remien.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •