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Thread: House Breaking Kenneled Pup???

  1. #11
    Senior Member DarrinGreene's Avatar
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    House training is all about surfaces. The pup learns to eliminate on a given surface as opposed to inside our outside the house. When he goes to the door it's to get to the grass he's accustomed to crapping on, that's all. Used to take dogs from hay fields to the desert and they all had a heck of a time initially finding a place to poo! Watch closely and you'll see that they usually avoid sidewalks and stone if they're used to grass. Emergencies and accidents occur but if you watch, you can tell they're looking for a different spot if there's no grass around.

    Standard regimen will work fine over about a month. In crate while in the house unless 100% supervised. Regular feeding/airing times. Restrict food and water after a set time in the evening.

    I have an 18 mo old that was in a kennel her first 6 months and has learned to use the grass now after crate training. I don't know that she's 100% housebroken because she's still a kennel dog but she no longer messes in the kennel after I retrained her.
    Darrin Greene

  2. #12
    Senior Member afdahl's Avatar
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    I got my first Lab at the age of four months. He'd been in a kennel and received daily attention from a trainer. He was a great dog in every way. When I finally brought him home, he figured out housebreaking in less than three days. For all I know he got it even sooner--but on the third morning the screen door was unlatched and he went out and around to his designated pooping spot and relieved himself there. He never made a mistake.

    This dog never liked linoleum floors, but I have thought that was more an issue of hip dysplasia (his was pretty bad) than of socialization. I could be wrong of course. I never saw anything else that remotely suggested inadequate socialization--he dealt with all new situations with grace and aplomb (and I exposed him to plenty), worked as a therapy dog, competed in obedience, and as a mature dog learned to retrieve and got a Qualifying JAM.

    I don't see "kennel" as synonymous with "neglect," but do think it's important to know the trainer.

    Amy Dahl

  3. #13
    Senior Member Mary Lynn Metras's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Howard N View Post
    Irish, I like your old way better than what you're planning for this new pup.

    IMO, he should be with you at 8 weeks learning about your life, places, other dogs and people, and all that will go into making him a good citizen in your house. Send him off for more training at 7 months or so but let him be a puppy from 8 weeks to 26 weeks.

    BTW, after a couple weeks learning about your household, that would be a great time to do the Hillman puppy stuff.

    It's probably just my prejudices but I dislike the institutional life for puppies. They should be in a home getting love, affection and puppy training.
    Agree, this is very important! IMO
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  4. #14
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    Thanks to all for your replies, all are given deep consideration. My predicament is multifaceted. I have had the constant companionship and joy of working with an incredible gundog that I raised and trained from a 7 week old pup. My companion / gundog died suddenly and completely unexpectedly on 9/3/13 and I was dealt a crushing blow at his loss. He passed the day after my birthday and on the opening day of our resident Canada Goose season, ironic in that he lived to hunt geese with me.

    I trained, hunted, and ran in both AKC and HRC hunt tests with my companion gundog and all that had the pleasure of watching him work thought of him as very special. He made quick friends with everyone he came into contact with. My constant companion, I am extremely lost and depressed without him at my side.

    My daughter just began her freshman year as a recruited soccer player. I am traveling two to three times per week to watch her play. I am retired and have both the time and skill to bring a pup to a very high level gundog status. I was hoping to start working with a more matured pup of 16 weeks toward the end of the soccer season to avoid the conflicts that might occur with that schedule. I also felt that by starting with a chronologically more mature pup this fall, I could work on a variety of early foundational training throughout the fall and winter and have the pup beyond the age when his adult teeth are coming in, moving into the spring and good weather for gundog training drills, yardwork, waterwork, etc.

    I tend to train slowly but thoroughly. I train incramentally adding new skill sets as I move the pup along, yet constantly revisiting the fundementals and reinforcing those skills continuously. I recognize that each pup is an individual and handle training related pressure as their maturity and demeanor allow them to. That said, my timing of obtaining a pup is with the hopes that I could move him along enough to hunt with him next season, yet I recognize this will all depend on if in fact he has progressed to the point where he is in fact determined by me to be ready to do so.

    I do prefer British / Irish field genetics for the body structure produced. I have also found these Labs to be easily trained and very proficient as gundogs.

    Cheers,
    Irishwhistler

  5. #15
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    I would take that 8 week old pup to the soccer practice and the games. Just my $.02. Don

  6. #16
    Senior Member Rainmaker's Avatar
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    Housetraining wouldn't be my biggest concern in this situation, but rather the whole picture. Some of these "headstart" deals are nothing more than scams to get some more $$, some are for real. I get asked a lot to raise pups. I don't do it because it is time consuming to do it well and I usually have more than enough of my own as it is. It will really depend on who is doing it for you. It can be a real advantage for many people who don't want to go through the little puppy stage but want the socializing and intro to all the good stuff done, but you really, really need to research who is going to be doing that and be assured it is actually being done, that pup isn't just spending those crucial first four months living in a kennel. Otherwise, you are better off taking pup home, putting in a very active boarding/daycare type kennel on the days you are traveling/can't take pup with you. There is nothing wrong with a breeder (or someone else, for that matter) keeping pup til 4 months old or so, if it is done right and to your expectations. I've gotten older pups that did great and pups at 7 weeks that did not.
    Kim Pfister, Rainmaker Labs

  7. #17
    Senior Member Duckquilizer's Avatar
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    Here is an exceprt from one kennel for a headstart program. If it was like this, I don't see a problem. Research is key to any trainer.

    Good Breeding" is essential (see article - How to choose a Super Duck Puppy). After your selection - the puppies socialization is critical - we can help!
    Should you not have the time to devote to raising your puppy - We can also help with House Breaking, Crate Training, Teaching the puppy good manners, early obedience (sit, here, heel) and working with your puppy retrieving birds. This a monthly program you are welcome to come participate and visit during the training.
    The program is **** a month and includes:

    •Raising the puppy in the house, House Breaking, Crate Training, teaching the puppy to walk on a leash, early obedience with sit, here and heel, lots of emphasis on good-manners (no one wants an unruly puppy!), introduction to gun shot, introduction to water and lots of Retriever training with birds.
    •We only keep a limited number of puppies - only 2 at time - for optimum attention. If this is something you are interested in, please contact us early!
    •We offer private or group classes in puppy training, obedience and use of commands to get your puppy on the right track to making him/her a TRUE "Super Duck Dog" and a well behaved member of your family.
    Kendall Layne

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  8. #18
    Senior Member Hunt'EmUp's Avatar
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    You could always look at a started dog, a tad more money perhaps, but with a started dog you get one you know has some skill, one that will definitely go hunting this season, one that you know will have the look you like, and one that the only thing you might have to worry about is how he'll take to the house. Of course me, I'd do both; get a started dog for this season, then a puppy in the spring, and have 2 dogs, because I also learned a few years ago that I'm unable to handle surprise losses, which leave me with no dog at all. Sure I might be in the poor house for a bit, but life is too short to be that unhappy.
    Last edited by Hunt'EmUp; 09-25-2013 at 12:45 PM.
    "They's Just DAWGS"
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  9. #19
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    A started dog is not an option for me after having asked a number of questions specific to that possibility. Also, I cannot have two dogs at this time.

    I am not able to post PM's now because I do not yet have enough posts (10) for the system to grant me permission to post PM's. So, on that note, anyone want to weigh in on the "Headstart" type programs offered by Duckhill Kennels / Robert Milner, or French Creek Kennels?

    Thanks,
    Irishwhistler

  10. #20
    Senior Member Duckquilizer's Avatar
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    EEEEeeeek...Irish guy with a Brit accent...
    Last edited by Duckquilizer; 09-25-2013 at 12:59 PM.
    Kendall Layne

    HR(2xHRCH) Ashland's Big Black Ruby to Go SH
    Dorie's Lady of the Lake(1K bird club)

    Never play leap frog with a unicorn.

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