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Thread: Should I spay my dog?

  1. #11
    Senior Member Julie R.'s Avatar
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    Another vote for waiting and seeing how she does at Senior and Master. The Golden gene pool for good field dogs isn't that large and if she's healthy and talented you may regret spaying her now. It's not something you can undo! Plus if she's the dog in your avatar she looks quite pretty. I'd definitely get with your breeder or perhaps someone local who knows field golden bloodlines, talk to them about your dog and your plans for her before spaying her.
    Julie R., Hope Springs Farm
    Chesapeake Bay Retrievers since 1981

  2. #12
    Senior Member Brettttka's Avatar
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    Not to highjack the thread but does neutering a male have any affect on drive in male dogs? Dont plan on breeding him and he only has 1 that has dropped which I know can increase cancer risks.
    Lone Oak's Marley Man.. (My first)

  3. #13
    Senior Member Hunt'EmUp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brettttka View Post
    Not to highjack the thread but does neutering a male have any affect on drive in male dogs? Dont plan on breeding him and he only has 1 that has dropped which I know can increase cancer risks.
    My experience, it can help bring some of the hyper-aggressive, insane high-rollers down a bit, but doesn't affect a well adjusted dog in terms of drive. They do seem to need less food to maintain working weight, so if you neuter you might be saving a bit on dog food. I would neuter a cryptorchid, to remove the retrained gonad which is still up inside,that's the one that's most likely to cause problems later. I know a couple of people who just had the retained one removed, left the other, I don't really see the point in that but it is an option.
    Last edited by Hunt'EmUp; 09-27-2013 at 01:05 PM.
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  4. #14
    Senior Member SjSmith's Avatar
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    So what would the cut-off age be if we are on the fence? Spaying or responsible breeding.
    We were thinking of having one litter and then spaying and would want to do it before the age at which health risks become a factor.
    Or decide not to breed and have her spayed. Thanks.
    If you're gonna be dumb, you gotta be tough.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Julie R.'s Avatar
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    From what I've learned (Chesapeakes since 1981) it's easier to get them bred and have a viable litter before they're 5, although I know people who've bred maiden bitches as old as 7 or 8. Most breeders generally won't breed them after 8 yrs. for two reasons: fertility can decline and whelping/raising pups is harder on older females. It can be a balancing act because for many females, they're at their best for training/competing during their prime breeding years. It's much easier on a 2- or 3-yr. old female to raise pups, but often that'll be before they've proven themselves. One thing the (excellent) repro. vet told me is that the female's uterus ages with every cycle, whether or not she's bred, which affects fertility. Most of mine are spayed after their last litter, but I do have an intact 13 yr. old. She showed in veterans' classes, hence wasn't spayed after her last litter. I left her intact because I view the risks of general anesthesia on an old dog riskier than potential problems from her being intact. You have to make the decision on breeding/spaying based on what works best for you and your dog.
    Julie R., Hope Springs Farm
    Chesapeake Bay Retrievers since 1981

  6. #16
    Senior Member windycanyon's Avatar
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    For me, 4 yrs would probably be my deciding point. Health/temperament/work ethic/maturity is obvious, yet the girl is still young enough to be very fertilel and hopefully patient yet playful w/ the pups. Of course that assumes all the health clearances are in place, including annual eye exams, etc..

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