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Thread: First Time Hunt Test

  1. #21
    Senior Member BJGatley's Avatar
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    LOL...This is not a sink or swam situation. This is an opportunity for you to do something that is fun. You will be in great company. Remember your first experience driving a car...Same experience.

  2. #22
    Senior Member Ken Bora's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BJGatley View Post
    LOL...This is not a sink or swam situation.
    well it is sometimes.
    have spair pants in your truck.
    spair everything is better.
    and rain gear and sun goo and bug spray.
    dress drab no white.
    bring food for you and dog
    and boots
    and if a germ person a moist towelette
    sometimes the birds are ripe
    "So what is big is not always the Trout nor the Deer but the chance, the being there. And what is full is not necessarily the creel nor the freezer, but the memory." ~ Aldo Leopold

    "The Greatest Obstacle to Discovery is not Ignorance -- It is the Illusion of Knowledge" ~ Daniel Boorstin

  3. #23
    Senior Member Duckquilizer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brushtop12 View Post
    So is there a circle that the handler must stay inside or something at the line? And if he drops it when he returns but i give the fetch up command and he picks it up is that still ok?
    You ever heard the term "Do the junior grab?" Most judges will tell you, but you should ask about how far you can go. Most of the time, it is about one step from where you are standing.
    Kendall Layne

    HR(2xHRCH) Ashland's Big Black Ruby to Go SH
    Dorie's Lady of the Lake(1K bird club)

    Never play leap frog with a unicorn.

  4. #24
    Senior Member HuntinDawg's Avatar
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    I'm a little confused. Has the dog run in hunt tests before? You said he is running for his JH title, which would mean he already has some Junior passes. How was he in those tests? Dogs are situational learners and they soon learn what to expect at hunt tests. For mine that meant they became very businesslike at hunt tests (a good thing IMO). For others it means they get wild. What did your dog do?

    I am very biased and opinionated but I believe this (double booking forcing you to handle your own dog) is the absolute best thing that could have happened to you and your dog. When it comes to hunt tests (I won't comment on field trials as I don't play that game) I believe owners should handle their own dogs whenever possible. How will you and your dog develop teamwork if you don't handle him? You will build your teamwork and the memory will be much better with you handling the dog IMO. Once the dog is gone all you have is memories. Would you rather have memories of YOU handling him to his ribbons and titles (and hopefully time spent actually hunting) or memories of watching your pro do it, or getting phone calls from your pro saying "he passed again, I'll mail you the ribbon"?

    In other good news, Junior is all about the dog. Your only job is to take him to the line, keeping him under control in the process, sit him in position to see the marks, hold his collar until released by the judges (do this even if he is steady, there is no extra credit for steadiness in Junior and you are there to pass, not to teach your dog what he can get away with at a HT without being corrected), send him after released by the judges and receive the birds when he returns. That may sound like a lot, but it isn't. If your dog is truly ready you should not need to handle in a Junior test. At the higher levels it is a lot more about teamwork so the handler has more to do with the pass/fail than in Junior.

    Good luck and have fun with your dog.
    ---------------------------------------------
    HRCH "Boomer" MH
    UH HR "Hunter" SH (RIP)

    "When you go to a test or a trial, your dog should be underwhelmed." ~ Evan Graham

    "It is unreasonable to expect a dog to be more precise than you are." ~ Rex Carr

    "You own what you condone." ~ Mike Lardy

  5. #25
    Senior Member Lonnie Spann's Avatar
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    Ok, here is the down and dirty on what to expect:

    Train the evening before the test, the same as you always do. Fido will do awesome while training and you will go to bed feeling optimistic and probably get very little sleep (kinda like a kid on Christmas eve).

    Wake up early and double check your list to make sure you have everything: dog, dog food, water, folding chair, leash, whistle, duck call, etc.

    Arrive at HT and check in, then proceed to your flight.

    Attend handler's meeting and watch test-dog.

    Make sure you check in with the marshall and know your dog number.

    Air Fido at least 3-4 dogs before you run. Notice how Fido seems to have a little more pep in his step!

    When you hear the marshall call your name to "get ready" proceed to the first holding blind (this is sometimes the side of a truck) and notice how Fido is sniffing where all of the other dogs before you have travelled down the same path. Also notice how Fido is becoming even more energetic and appears to be suffering from an immediate onset of partial hearing loss.

    Proceed to the holding blind. Notice how Fido has decided that he doesn't want to sit patiently and wait his turn but much prefers to pull on the leash in an attempt to look under, around or over the holding blind.

    Proceed to the line. Notice how Fido now prefers to lead the way as if he knows where you want him to go and especially notice that he does this on TWO LEGS!

    Arrive at the line and tell the judges your number. Make Fido sit so that he can mark the bird. Notice that Fido has forgotten the command "sit".

    Signal when you are ready, Fido has been ready.

    When the judges say "dog" release Fido and hope for the best!

    Hopefully Fido will retrieve the duck and deliver to hand just like he has been taught and done so many times before. Notice that Fido likes to air a second time when he has a crowd watching.

    After the last retrieve get Fido on lead and back to the truck. Note sometimes this resembles a steer wrestling competition.

    Good luck.

    Lonnie Spann
    Last edited by Lonnie Spann; 10-03-2013 at 07:21 AM.
    DISCLAIMER: The above post is the opinionated and biased view of your's truly, Lonnie Spann, and is in no way intended to reflect the opinions or views of the unfortunate individuals named below who just happen to be doomed with guilt by association.

    Member of CAHRC and North AL HRC. I train with AND AM FRIENDS WITH: Fishduck, Laidback, Splash_Em, RF2, Drake2014, Claimsadj, Hooked on Quackers, RookieTrainer and Roseberry.

    HRCH Spann's Quacker Jack "Jack" 500 Pt. Club (New & IMPROVED jacket).

  6. #26
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    Just 2 quick additional thoughts/hints. Several people mentioned the dog has run at least 2 Jr HT with pro and that the owner should ask how dog behaved. My guess is that even if this pup was perfection with the pro, he may still be a wild man with the owner. Dogs sense anxiety and insecurity and they take advantage of that! A tip a judge told me once was to have a peppermint or chew mint gum at the line. The mint calms the handler(and his queasy stomach) AND calms the dog. Not sure I have seen a huge effect, but sure doesn't hurt, and I feel I have done something. Just don't choke on the peppermint. Also, while airing the dog and walking to the blinds, make sure the dog does not see the marks sent. If he does, he will be looking at them from a completely different angle than from the line, and it could really screw him up. There is a little bit of timing to walking from behind the truck to the next blind, or from blind to blind. watch the others. You should always have pup tucked out of sight when the birds are thrown/shot.

  7. #27
    Senior Member RookieTrainer's Avatar
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    Lonnie, if you keep using my JH experience without my permission I am going to be forced to send you a cease-and-desist letter. And in case you have forgotten, my dog's name is Jimmy, not Fido.

    All of that sounds WAY too familiar. Especially the "up on two legs" part. At one test Mr. Otey was about 1.5 seconds away from having a lap full of Jimmy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lonnie Spann View Post
    Ok, here is the down and dirty on what to expect:

    Train the evening before the test, the same as you always do. Fido will do awesome while training and you will go to bed feeling optimistic and probably get very little sleep (kinda like a kid on Christmas eve).

    Wake up early and double check your list to make sure you have everything: dog, dog food, water, folding chair, leash, whistle, duck call, etc.

    Arrive at HT and check in, then proceed to your flight.

    Attend handler's meeting and watch test-dog.

    Make sure you check in with the marshall and know your dog number.

    Air Fido at least 3-4 dogs before you run. Notice how Fido seems to have a little more pep in his step!

    When you hear the marshall call your name to "get ready" proceed to the first holding blind (this is sometimes the side of a truck) and notice how Fido is sniffing where all of the other dogs before you have travelled down the same path. Also notice how Fido is becoming even more energetic and appears to be suffering from an immediate onset of partial hearing loss.

    Proceed to the holding blind. Notice how Fido has decided that he doesn't want to sit patiently and wait his turn but much prefers to pull on the leash in an attempt to look under, around or over the holding blind.

    Proceed to the line. Notice how Fido now prefers to lead the way as if he knows where you want him to go and especially notice that he does this on TWO LEGS!

    Arrive at the line and tell the judges your number. Make Fido sit so that he can mark the bird. Notice that Fido has forgotten the command "sit".

    Signal when you are ready, Fido has been ready.

    When the judges say "dog" release Fido and hope for the best!

    Hopefully Fido will retrieve the duck and deliver to hand just like he has been taught and done so many times before. Notice that Fido likes to air a second time when he has a crowd watching.

    After the last retrieve get Fido on lead and back to the truck. Note sometimes this resembles a steer wrestling competition.

    Good luck.

    Lonnie Spann
    Steve Wyatt

    HR Belle's Rolling Big Rig "Jimmy"

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karen Klotthor View Post
    What #4 means is do not touch your dog to do anything but hold. And until you retrieve the bird, than you can hold the collar just not before taking the bird. YOU can talk to the dog once the judges call you dog# or say dog.
    TO the OP, what test are you running at the end of the month.

    It will be the test in Greensboro, AL on Oct. 25th and 26th

  9. #29
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    I am also new to the hunt test scene and will be running a junior HT this weekend. I have a question......Once at the line and dog on leash or holding the collar, you signal the judges for the bird, you are still holding the collar or leash? Is this ok or is this considered touching the dog? Or can you hold the leash/collar until the judges release you to send your dog?

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuntinDawg View Post
    I'm a little confused. Has the dog run in hunt tests before? You said he is running for his JH title, which would mean he already has some Junior passes. How was he in those tests? Dogs are situational learners and they soon learn what to expect at hunt tests. For mine that meant they became very businesslike at hunt tests (a good thing IMO). For others it means they get wild. What did your dog do?

    I am very biased and opinionated but I believe this (double booking forcing you to handle your own dog) is the absolute best thing that could have happened to you and your dog. When it comes to hunt tests (I won't comment on field trials as I don't play that game) I believe owners should handle their own dogs whenever possible. How will you and your dog develop teamwork if you don't handle him? You will build your teamwork and the memory will be much better with you handling the dog IMO. Once the dog is gone all you have is memories. Would you rather have memories of YOU handling him to his ribbons and titles (and hopefully time spent actually hunting) or memories of watching your pro do it, or getting phone calls from your pro saying "he passed again, I'll mail you the ribbon"?

    In other good news, Junior is all about the dog. Your only job is to take him to the line, keeping him under control in the process, sit him in position to see the marks, hold his collar until released by the judges (do this even if he is steady, there is no extra credit for steadiness in Junior and you are there to pass, not to teach your dog what he can get away with at a HT without being corrected), send him after released by the judges and receive the birds when he returns. That may sound like a lot, but it isn't. If your dog is truly ready you should not need to handle in a Junior test. At the higher levels it is a lot more about teamwork so the handler has more to do with the pass/fail than in Junior.

    Good luck and have fun with your dog.
    No this will be his first pass and first time ever in that environment (and me too) That's another question - how many times does he have to pass to get his JH title?

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