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Thread: behavioral traits

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    Default behavioral traits

    Which traits do you consider to be genetically transferred ? Steve S
    "Your dog learns as much by doing his work right,by your praise and encouragement, as he does by your displeasure and correction." DLWalters

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    Senior Member Julie R.'s Avatar
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    Not sure if these are what you're looking for in behavioral traits, but I'm on the 9th or 10th generation of Chesapeakes descended from the first one I got in 1981. Most of them bare their teeth and "smile" at you, like my first CBR. I didn't get serious about breeding until about 10 or 12 years ago, (never saw a trained retriever before then!) all the ones I've raised that have run HTs have had uncanny marking ability evident as young pups, and very good eyesight. And as they age, they all seem to go deaf at about 10, even ones that weren't shot over much.
    Julie R., Hope Springs Farm
    Chesapeake Bay Retrievers since 1981

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    Quote Originally Posted by Julie R. View Post
    Not sure if these are what you're looking for in behavioral traits, but I'm on the 9th or 10th generation of Chesapeakes descended from the first one I got in 1981. Most of them bare their teeth and "smile" at you, like my first CBR. I didn't get serious about breeding until about 10 or 12 years ago, (never saw a trained retriever before then!) all the ones I've raised that have run HTs have had uncanny marking ability evident as young pups, and very good eyesight. And as they age, they all seem to go deaf at about 10, even ones that weren't shot over much.
    I would consider that one .... I believe there are a lot more behaviors that we train out of them that are passed from generation to generation...the so called natural dog instead of the trained dog....Steve S
    "Your dog learns as much by doing his work right,by your praise and encouragement, as he does by your displeasure and correction." DLWalters

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    When we lived in CA, Eloise Heller Cherry's dogs dominated the bloodlines. I remember one trait that I have seen out of Cub's Tule Tiger offspring (CBR) where when a dog was waiting on the line and the handler had called for the birds, the dog would be holding up one paw in excitement. I have since seen the same behavior in other Chessies, but not every one so I conclude it is probably somewhat genetic.

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    I don't breed dogs... but once maybe 30 years ago we allowed our male to breed someone else's dog, took a puppy. Darn if both dad and daughter didn't casually cross their front paws when they were laying down. Had the identical posture.

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    One of the funnier things I've noticed. Years ago I trained a number of dogs sired by Pachanga Magnum Force. They all shared the trait that if you put them in a Vari-Kennel in the back of a truck, they would tip it over if it wasn't anchored in place. Few other dogs have done this.

    I suspect it was a matter of standing and leaning on the side of the crate vs lying down. Still interesting that it was so dependent on breeding.

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    What about such things as some dogs run straight while others are big cheaters....water attitude...vocalizing...I think we all agree that the ability to mark is related to genetics....can't we ? Steve S
    "Your dog learns as much by doing his work right,by your praise and encouragement, as he does by your displeasure and correction." DLWalters

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    What about such things as some dogs run straight while others are big cheaters....water attitude...vocalizing...I think we all agree that the ability to mark is related to genetics....can't we ? Steve S
    I think in my own experience that FT bred dogs tend to run straight or straighter than non FT dogs. NON ft dogs often break down (and I'm talking on go get um marks) sooner But I also believe it has to do with focus, and drive,,,something ft dogs usually often possess due to breeding.
    I believe Marking is composed of some of the same material,,including a high level of intelligence,because there are a lot of dogs with good eyes that can't mark. I do not follow the common belief that dogs mark well because of superior eye sight. I believe good eye sight is important but many more traits come together to make a dog a naturally good marker. So in a nut shell every thing is genetic to a large degree,,,we shape the material they have,,good or bad to the best that those components are manifested in the animal.

    Some dogs will always suck at field work no matter who trains them and some will excel beyond average without the best training. That's genetic.
    Pete
    John 5 :30
    I can of my own self do nothing ,as I hear , I judge,,and my judgement is just, because I seek not my own will,,but the will of the father which hath sent me
    John 7:16 -- Jesus answered them and said my doctrine is not mine, but his that sent me.
    mark 16:9 -- So then after the lord had spoken unto them,he was received up in heaven, and sat on the right hand of God
    I Tim. 2:5 --For there is one God and one mediator between God and man ,, the man Christ Jesus

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    In my very limited experience, water attitude seems to be largely genetic. Seems the pups of these water obsessed dogs don't need to be *introduced* to water. They just vault on in the first time they encounter it.

    Barb Gibson
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    CH Rosewood Little Giant UDX VER RA MHU SH MXP MJP XFP T2BP DJ VCX WCX CCA CGC FFX-OG
    also UCH HR UUD UJJ URO1 UHIT
    (golden retriever) born 3-10-07
    a.k.a. "Tito", "The Tito Monster"
    www.GoTeamTito.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by hotel4dogs View Post
    In my very limited experience, water attitude seems to be largely genetic. Seems the pups of these water obsessed dogs don't need to be *introduced* to water. They just vault on in the first time they encounter it.

    I believe this to be true. My last dog was exposed to water for the first time at about four months old (got him in the winter). Tossed a stick from shore and he charged in full speed. He was initially shocked when the water became deep. 3-4 awkward strokes and then he swam calmly the rest of the way. After that you couldn't keep him out of the water.

    He always exploded into the water .... just like his father!
    Last edited by pcarpenter; 10-07-2013 at 01:54 PM.

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