The RetrieverTraining.Net Forums The Retriever Academy
Total Retriever Training with Mike Lardy
Hawkeye Media Gunners Up Tritronics Outdoor Media
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Help with New Pup

  1. #1
    Junior Member GRun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Saratoga County, NY
    Posts
    26

    Default Help with New Pup

    Our new pup arrives on Friday! and I am looking for information that might help with developing an FT/hunting dog that will most of the time be a family pet. I have owned field labs before and ran some NAHRA HTs and AKC quals in the 90's, but these dogs were more working dogs that lived in kennels rather than full-time family pets.

    Thanks to all the great info on this forum and my new copy of Hillman puppy video, I feel prepared for starting the pup's yard and field work, but I don't feel prepared for the other 98% percent of the pup's time. Are there any books/videos that include info on how to approach all of the non-training time in field dog's life? I understand the importance of general concepts of socialization, exposure, stimulatuion, and just enjoying our new dog. I am just not sure how much structure is needed during non training activities so that the dog developes in a balanced manner.

    Thanks
    Jeff

  2. #2
    Senior Member Cowtown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    885

    Default

    Hey Jeff...Jeff here. Yep, I'd recommend Jackie Mertens' "Sound Beginnings" dvd. It's like $40 bucks and there is a ton of excellent info in there.

    Also, purchase Volume I (of 3) of Mike Lardy's Articles.

    Good luck and have fun with your pup!

  3. #3
    Junior Member GRun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Saratoga County, NY
    Posts
    26

    Default

    Thank you Jeff.

    The Mike Lardy Vol. I is on my list to buy. I will also check out the Merten's dvd.
    Jeff

  4. #4
    Senior Member T-Pines's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    968

    Default

    Jeff,

    I am certain that within your Hillmann Puppy DVD you have a wealth of guidance about how to handle the majority of your interactions with your pup. Bill devotes a significant amount of his narration to his general philosophy for creating the relationship that you want to have with your puppy. His philosophy and principles for this relationship apply to ALL the time that you spend with your pup, not just the formal training sessions.

    In the last sentence of your post, you say that you are striving for balanced development. Balance is not achieved with a paint-by-numbers approach. It is a dynamic exchange between you and your pup whereby you continuously assess your pup's needs for more of one thing and less of something else. For example, some pups might need more roughhouse playtime and other pups might need less. You praise and encourage the attitudes and behaviors that are a tiny step closer to your objectives. You gently discourage and guide your pup away from the attitudes and behaviors that take him further away from your objectives.

    Pups thrive on routine, but you don't need heavy structure. I do not consider Hillmann's formal training dynamic to be particularly structured ... which is why it facilitates the approach to Balance that I described above.

    And in all interactions, lots of praise, lots of touch, lots of fun, lots of teamwork (play with your pup), lots of new experiences ... all the while subtly teaching, subtly challenging, gently guiding. Finesse.

    Is there something more specific that you are looking for that is not addressed by Hillmann's philosophy and principles?

    Jim

  5. #5
    Junior Member GRun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Saratoga County, NY
    Posts
    26

    Default

    Jim,

    Thank you for your reply. I like your comments on praise, encouragment, and gentle discouragement. You are right, it is really the philosophy and approach that attracted me to the Hillmann video. I will be re-watching the tape as time goes on to get as much of that aspect as I can and will be buying his newer videos.

    To be more specific, I have had field dogs and pets, but they have been different animals at different times. I am looking for guidance, either first-hand advice or references to prepared materials (books, vids, etc.) that might provide some insight on the development of a field dog that is also a family pet. I know its possible since there are plenty FCs & MHs, that are also great familiy dogs. The dog will be spending a lot of time with other family members. Do I need to have any ground rules for myself or familiy so that the pet side of the dogs life enhances the field dog and vice versa?
    Jeff

  6. #6
    Senior Member metalone67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Oh
    Posts
    2,184

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GRun View Post
    Jim,

    Thank you for your reply. I like your comments on praise, encouragment, and gentle discouragement. You are right, it is really the philosophy and approach that attracted me to the Hillmann video. I will be re-watching the tape as time goes on to get as much of that aspect as I can and will be buying his newer videos.

    To be more specific, I have had field dogs and pets, but they have been different animals at different times. I am looking for guidance, either first-hand advice or references to prepared materials (books, vids, etc.) that might provide some insight on the development of a field dog that is also a family pet. I know its possible since there are plenty FCs & MHs, that are also great familiy dogs. The dog will be spending a lot of time with other family members. Do I need to have any ground rules for myself or familiy so that the pet side of the dogs life enhances the field dog and vice versa?
    To answer your last question, ABSOLUTELY, everyone needs to be on the same page in regards to praise given and corrections. IMO confusion will break down training quicker than anything.
    If you don't allow your pup to have, let's say, a bumper in the house, but your wife is always giving him one he'll get confused on what is right or wrong.
    I always make sure I watch my videos while the GF is in the living room with me, so she understands what I'm trying to accomplish.
    When she makes a mistake, she get's put outside and not the pup. LOL

    I really pays off, the GF must have not latched my pups kennel right and she got out and was in the house all day and not one accident, no chewed shoes, and not chewed furniture. She was only 13 weeks at the time. All this because we both were on the same page on her training.
    The foundation to a great retriever is obedience.
    Firestorms Full Throttle Chevy aka Callie-Roo 7/5/2007 - 10/25/2013 I miss you every day
    Proud owner of Kona's Surfer Girl, aka Loki.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •