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Thread: Marking ability???

  1. #1
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    Default Marking ability???

    I have a 8 month old BM with a phenomenal pedigree that can't mark very good at all. He is a super smart dog that has blown thru training faster than any pup I have trained. He is finishing up swimby and running bird boy blinds with style and handles pressure well. I bought him to train and sell but like him so much I havn't been able to part with. I said all that to say will the lightbulb come on or is this due to immaturity or just something I'm gonna have to really work on. I'm an experienced trainer and have trained many east Texas backyard bred dogs that marked better. I know for the venues I run (hunt test) he can be trained up. Just wanted to get some opinions on marking in regards to a young dog? Never had what I would call a bad marker until now!!!

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    Senior Member John Robinson's Avatar
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    One of the best FC/AFCs I knew was a mediocre marker, but that 30-40% of the time he made it past the first series, watch out! He was so good on blinds and very-very good in the water, he won a lot of trials, including a double header at age eleven.

    It sounds like you have trained enough dogs to evaluate his marking at eight months, but I have had two that were just fair markers when young but matured through training and seasoning into very good markers.

    John

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    Senior Member Bartona500's Avatar
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    I have one currently at 17 months and is a miserable marker. Gets close to the area and loses her mind, hunts all of kingdom come.

    She's superb at everything else, so I've decided to pull back a bit and run simple singles and see if she improves over time.
    -Barton Ramsey

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    This is exactly the kind of info I'm looking for. Thanks john. He has so much brains that I just can't see him coming into his own when he matures. He is exactly the kind of dog I'm looking for in every aspect besides that. When u start pinching ears and forcing to the pile u see what a dog is made of. He was the dog breaking his neck on the third ear pinch of the first session to get the bumper in his mounth and backed up 60 yds with no bugging or no goes the first session of force to pile. Just giving examples on the dog in question. I'm doing some depth perception drills and he has improved but he doesn't seem to have that inherited marking ability trait. He gets his marks but generally always has a hunt and will sometimes break down way early. Kinda strange like.

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    Bartona500, I have trained a lot of dogs like that but mine hunts tight but always seems to break down way early like he is not marking it at all. If he gets to the AOF he has a short tight hunt but other times he hunts 50 yards to soon. Started schooling doubles and he has a good memory in regards to coming in whirling around for the next mark and no trouble as these are easy water doubles. He's the best dog I've stood beside as far as brains and pedigree but he's the worst marker.

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    Senior Member weathered's Avatar
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    Maybe I'm the only one that ever thinks this way, but have you had his eyes checked by an ACVO vet, like you would for CERF? Always a possibility that he doesn't have good eyes, even if parents passed CERF.

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    Senior Member HuntinDawg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jchamberlain View Post
    Bartona500, I have trained a lot of dogs like that but mine hunts tight but always seems to break down way early like he is not marking it at all. If he gets to the AOF he has a short tight hunt but other times he hunts 50 yards to soon. Started schooling doubles and he has a good memory in regards to coming in whirling around for the next mark and no trouble as these are easy water doubles. He's the best dog I've stood beside as far as brains and pedigree but he's the worst marker.
    From your posts it sounds like you have trained more dogs than I have, so you've probably already thought of this and tried it, but many times when a young dog is hunting short frequently the dog was stretched out too soon. Maybe shorten up and see how he does? Does he ever blow past his marks? You mentioned hunting short several times but never mentioned blowing past them. It seems to me that if he simply lacked marking ability he would be all over the map, not consistently short.
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    Senior Member BonMallari's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by weathered View Post
    Maybe I'm the only one that ever thinks this way, but have you had his eyes checked by an ACVO vet, like you would for CERF? Always a possibility that he doesn't have good eyes, even if parents passed CERF.

    ^^^^ This first.....then ask yourself these questions

    1. can the dog count past two, as in can he remember the third bird in a triple

    2. if the dog's eyesight is off then his depth perception will also keep him from being a good marker

    3. Is the dog marking with his eyes, or is he trying to wind everything and find it with his nose

    4. Is the dog running a reasonably straight line toward the AOF, or is he out for a Sunday stroll and chasing butterflies

    5. what happens when the dog gets in the AOF, does he get worried and start looking up for help, or does he dig his nose in the ground and try and hunt it up

    6. Can the dog mark on open water, can he mark multiples on open water


    The only reason I know about these questions is because I had a dog named Rio, best singles marker ever, but couldnt count to two if I spotted him the TW...and these were the questions that an old experienced trainer asked me before I realized he couldnt count
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    A few things that I learned still ring true. "Lanse when you get a gift, say thank you and walk away. When you get a screwing walk away. You are going to get a lot more screwings than gifts"

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    Junior Member woodgoat's Avatar
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    Very good thread. I often wondered about marking ability myself. Very helpfull questions above^^^^.

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    Senior Member Quackwacker's Avatar
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    I personally believe marking ability starts and is taught as a puppy. I try and keep all puppy marks on very short grass and as white as possible, even tying white ribbon on the the bumper or bird. Teaching a dog to mark with his eyes is super important to me. slowly stretching them out as they grow.

    Even some of the older dogs that I want to learn to mark better, I will tie the white ribbon. I want the dog to see the mark and be confidant that they saw it!

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