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Thread: Marking ability???

  1. #31
    Senior Member roseberry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jchamberlain View Post
    He is a Grady son and I have never seen a dog as smart!!!
    i have two grady pups. one just turned 24 months and is not a field trial marker, didn't look like a field trial marker at 8 months, never will be a field trial marker. the other is 21 months and is a pretty nice derby marker, always has been a nice marker.

    the 24 month old will make a very good hunt test/hunting dog. i was marshalling a derby recently and no one had a test dog so i ran him as test dog in all 4 series. we were standing around and someone ask what my intensions for him were. i said i intended to sell him to a very good hunting/hunt test home. another person replied, "he is a pretty nice marking dog.....will he handle?" before i could reply, a very astute pro from mississippi says, "will he handle? didn't you see him run the first series?" like in earl's experience, he is a very nice blind running dog.

    the 21 month old has run two derbies. he has an rj and a dq he may get to run a couple more. he runs nice blinds too.

    marking wise i am 50:50 on grady pups.
    Last edited by roseberry; 10-22-2013 at 07:57 PM.
    john mccallie

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jchamberlain View Post
    All very good posts. I think I may have increased distance to soon and it shows. May be a very viable cause. One comment refered to ribbon on bumbers and sort and I never do that and think that I should. I use avery hexabumbers and marks can be hard to see. I'm gonna back up and try some different things. I have done what I call the ladder drill in which u start with a thrower short gradually increasing distance and then shortening up in which they become check down marks. I have seen some good markers have trouble the first time but Cutter was stepping on his marks before I went back to marks in the field. He's not terrible but u don't see him run and think wow that pup can mark. I know for the venues I run I will be able to title but at the rate he's going with all other work he will be ready for a finished test at a year old. He's ready to run seasoned now.
    How many of his marks are either fresh dead ducks or clip wing/shot fliers vs. bumpers? If you want him to mark and hunt fowl then you have to train with birds not bumpers. I believe you are speaking of little marking drills with bumpers and birds in the field? If she hasn't had a lot of live shot/clip wings or dead birds, work on bringing the breeding out in your pup, get her prey drive strong on birds, you may see a big difference. Again I only ready the last few posts and your OP so I may have missed the mark
    Last edited by jeff evans; 10-22-2013 at 08:31 PM.
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  3. #33
    Senior Member Ted Shih's Avatar
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    My thoughts:

    1. Marking is a gift. You can make a good marker better, but you can't make a great marker, they are born. And yes, if you work at it, you can teach a great marking dog how not to mark.
    2. Great marking is not required to have a great field trial dog. A good to very good marker who is an excellent problem solver and good in the water will get you lots of points.
    3. You enhance marking with lots of marks. Quality is important, but quantity is, too.
    4. I don't know if I could say at 8 months of age whether a dog was a poor marker or not.
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  4. #34
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    I agree with Ted here. At 8 months it's still early to make that call. I didn't read every post on this. If it hasn't been pointed out I would back up an simplify the marks a build it up from there. If your not aware there is a great marking drill I learned last yr from a Hunt Test Pro to do that can help with marking abilities. It's call the chair drill. You need 5 white chairs. You put the white chairs in a W shape in the field. You throw marks how every you want. You can hip pockets, mom an pop, outside deep inside short outside deep ETC ETC!!! You can use it to teach run by short gun or to check done to short gun. You can even run blinds thru the chair marks. You can do about any combo you want with it. It's a great drill. An I think it teaches a dog to start counting. Cause when it walks to the line it see 5 white gun stations and it gets them to focus more. To give you example of how it helps. I'm training 2 dogs at the moment. A 7yr old and a 26 month old on it. My 7yr old was ok marker before starting drill. But after using drill her marking ability improved greatly. She started looking at the memory marks on her way back to the line an started picking which mark she wanted next. She never did the before doing the drill. As for my young on on this. She started on the drill. An has turned into a great marker. I mean GREAT marker. If she misses a mark it by a foot or two. An she does the same thing when returning to the line an at the line. I have never seen a drill improve a dogs marking ability like this drill.
    This drill also made 7yr and 26 month old have tighter hunts when they missed marks. 7yr old had problems with big hunts sometimes. An now that has changed.

    Here is a pic that shows doubles on one setup.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by duckdogs167; 10-22-2013 at 10:55 PM. Reason: Added more pics

  5. #35
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    Sorry that was so long but was best way to explain. Just remember. Go to square one. SIMPLIFY an build back up.

  6. #36
    Senior Member BJGatley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Shih View Post
    My thoughts:

    1. Marking is a gift. You can make a good marker better, but you can't make a great marker, they are born. And yes, if you work at it, you can teach a great marking dog how not to mark.
    2. Great marking is not required to have a great field trial dog. A good to very good marker who is an excellent problem solver and good in the water will get you lots of points.
    3. You enhance marking with lots of marks. Quality is important, but quantity is, too.
    4. I don't know if I could say at 8 months of age whether a dog was a poor marker or not.
    Kudos...My thoughts as well...How about slowing down and let the dog......

  7. #37
    Senior Member RookieTrainer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sundown49 aka Otey B View Post
    I have found out with my Traveler son that when I do not HURRY to send him his marking improves 100%. He has so much desire that it sometimes gets in the way of his BRAIN.
    No Traveler pup here by a long shot, but a pretty good marker according to the FT pro that has spent some training on him, and we get a lot better results when his handler remembers to slow down and make smaller movements. Even something as simple as leaving the bird in his mouth until he gets lined up on the next mark helps a lot.

    I got an email from the inimitable Mr. Brown yesterday to that effect, and I may try to get away with taping it to my hand for the hunt tests we are doing. It would improve our chances 1000%.
    Last edited by RookieTrainer; 10-23-2013 at 08:40 AM.
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  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jchamberlain View Post
    This is exactly the kind of info I'm looking for. Thanks john. He has so much brains that I just can't see him coming into his own when he matures. He is exactly the kind of dog I'm looking for in every aspect besides that. When u start pinching ears and forcing to the pile u see what a dog is made of. He was the dog breaking his neck on the third ear pinch of the first session to get the bumper in his mounth and backed up 60 yds with no bugging or no goes the first session of force to pile. Just giving examples on the dog in question. I'm doing some depth perception drills and he has improved but he doesn't seem to have that inherited marking ability trait. He gets his marks but generally always has a hunt and will sometimes break down way early. Kinda strange like.
    I'm in the camp that would suggest as pup gets older, and sees more marks, marking may improve. Kinda' hard to challenge pup on some marks as you would normally if pup isn't marking well.

    If it were me and was genuinely concerned about his eyesight, I'd get myself the big -est, White-est pigeon out of the coop, clip wing it, and set pup up the same distances that brings on the big hunts.
    Pup 'ought to nail it.
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