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Thread: Less than ideal situation

  1. #1
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    Default Less than ideal situation

    Hi Guys,

    I'm new here and new to training. I do have a less than ideal situation that I wanted to run by some more experienced gentlemen. Here's the situation:

    I work as a houseparent at a residential care facility. I'm an avid duck hunter and actually get the opportunity to take some of the students in the program out hunting. My administration has a rule, and understandably so, if a staff member's dog in anyway nips/bites a student, the dog has to go. SO.... for me, financially it wouldn't be all that smart to invest in a registered dog or a dog that is professionally trained. My thought is that at this point I think that the best bet is a craigslist or rescue dog. I might get lucky and find a breeder that has a dog that doesn't pass health, hip, eye inspections, but I'm not counting on it.

    The question is this: do you guys have any suggestions as to how to identify character traits that would suggest a pup/young lab, that isn't necessarily pedigreed, might be a good hunting dog?

    I'm new to this and look forward to learning as much as I can!

    Thanks for any information!

  2. #2
    Senior Member John Robinson's Avatar
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    Or you could get a well bred dog with a pleasant temperament, and train him or her well. I've had seven retrievers over a more than twenty year period and I have never had a dog come close to biting or nipping someone. Odds are much greater getting a craigslist dog with biting issues...

  3. #3
    Senior Member Lonnie Spann's Avatar
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    I currently have 5 labs and none of them nip or bite anyone. You might want to research the breed.

    Lonnie Spann
    DISCLAIMER: The above post is the opinionated and biased view of your's truly, Lonnie Spann, and is in no way intended to reflect the opinions or views of the unfortunate individuals named below who just happen to be doomed with guilt by association.

    Member of CAHRC and North AL HRC. I train with AND AM FRIENDS WITH: Fishduck, Laidback, Splash_Em, RF2, Drake2014, Claimsadj, Hooked on Quackers, RookieTrainer and Roseberry.

    HRCH Spann's Quacker Jack "Jack" 500 Pt. Club (New & IMPROVED jacket).

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    Senior Member Ken Bora's Avatar
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    Welcome to the RTF KKelly
    Had Chessies since '97
    none bit anyone, but me.
    don't pour gravy on the kids and you should be fine.
    "So what is big is not always the Trout nor the Deer but the chance, the being there. And what is full is not necessarily the creel nor the freezer, but the memory." ~ Aldo Leopold

    "The Greatest Obstacle to Discovery is not Ignorance -- It is the Illusion of Knowledge" ~ Daniel Boorstin

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    Senior Member Mary Lynn Metras's Avatar
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    When you say residential care facility what type of client are you dealing with? The reason I ask is sometimes in certain settings such as you are mention no fault of the client but they may be upset at the dog or lack certain understanding regarding the dog and not necessarily mean to be mean but are mean to the dog through no fault of their own. I take my dogs all through the nursing homes and I advocate for my dog so as not to put him in any harms way of the clients. I have had only one person kick the dog. My dogs are not aggressive nor did the older guy do anything when kicked at. So what I am trying to say is a Lab is a very suitable dog in any setting but you are the dog's advocate and have to be watching all the time.Labs generally do not nite and are very congenial JMHO
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  6. #6
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    Keep in mind most puppies are going to be teething which could be mistaken as a nip/bite.

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    Senior Member chuck187's Avatar
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    It's admirable what you are doing.
    HRCH UR01 CH UNJ WHISKEY CREEK'S DUKE CHASCERI MH
    Cherokee Foothills HRC

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    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
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    Having a tough time following the logic of the OP.
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

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    Senior Member windycanyon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HNTFSH View Post
    Having a tough time following the logic of the OP.
    So am I, starting w/ the "gentlemen" part. OP, there are a lot of experienced women on this list also!

    That aside, I have worked w/ rescue for a number of years, in addition to having my own Labrador breeding program. I have run into far more temperament issues w/ rescues than with Labs from known/respected pedigrees.

    Many of the so called "Labs" and Lab mixes in the shelters and advertised on CL are pit or shep mixes, and do not have near the unflappable temperaments as our good old purebred Labs.

    Get a well bred pup, go to training classes, and have fun! Anne

  10. #10
    Senior Member Montview's Avatar
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    I would think giving up any dog would be traumatic either way, especially after investing the time, money, and effort in training to the point of being a good hunting retriever. As stated earlier, it would be much more likely to have threat of a nip-induced injury from a rescued dog without known history and so forth. Granted, I would also be worried with any dog that if a student were to accept a bird from a dog and the dog mouthed at all when giving it up, any tooth contact could feasibly be perceived as a nip/bite. You may need to have strict rules in place where the only one doing anything around the dog's face (except perhaps petting when an appropriate time) is you?
    -Julie, Monty (2005 YLM), Rogue (2009 BLM), and Eddy (2013 BLM)

    "To err is human, to forgive, canine." - Anon

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