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Thread: heeling on both sides

  1. #11
    Senior Member DarrinGreene's Avatar
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    if you're having a problem with a dog that is a left side heeler and you now want to change it... first off assess the value of going to the trouble. there have been some really great dogs that were single sided. if you really think you need it, you can use a fence or a wall to keep the dog off your left side while you're teaching the right side behavior.
    Darrin Greene

  2. #12

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    Usually the problem in using two-sided heeling is more with the handler than with the dog. it is the handler that has the old habits of using just the traditional side for heeling ----- such as they were perhaps taught in some obedience class or by a friend helping them. Old habits are hard for humans to change. It is not complicated or difficult to heel off both sides. The main key is to start early. It is harder on the dog and the handler to try to add it in later such as when the dog is already through D-T--- although not impossible. I will be covering this in my journal (see the thread further down that talks about Ultra-Sound and X-Rays predicting number of pups) as my new pup arrives and starts to learn about its world.

    Happy Retrieving

    Marilyn Fender
    Windstorm Retrievers --- Wisconsin and Georgia
    Home of 1996 NFC Storm's Riptide Star (Rascal) and birthplace of his son 2000 CNAFC CFC Quik Windstorm (Chip).
    mf96nfc@centurytel.net

  3. #13
    Senior Member Evan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shinyhead View Post
    Would some of you veterans out there give me some tips on how to get a dog to heel on either side? How do I practice it and then ingrain it into the dogs behavior? Thanks in advance.
    If you have a left side heeler, think about the techniques you used to help your dog as a handler; moving up & back, push/pull, etc. Flip the same techniques, and apply them on the other side. It's simple. It's just not easy for many people, but that's because we are not as adept at changing our habits as we are insistent upon our dogs changing theirs. One of the better ways of helping your dog through this period of change is Wagon Wheel Lining drills. Lots of turning in either direction, pushing & pulling. Practice, practice, practice.

    Evan
    "Prepare your dog in such a manner that the work he is normally called upon to do under-whelms him, not overwhelms him." ~ Evan Graham

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  4. #14
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    I'm interested in trying this with the pup I'm going to be getting. But, having never done it before AND because I am a motor moron sometimes, when we do drills like Wagon Wheel, shouldn't I so some on one side, some on the other. (For ME... more than the dog. I know it's going to feel weird.)

  5. #15
    Senior Member Evan's Avatar
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    Yes. And for you it would be a good suggestion to make it a 4-way drill; a Wagon Wheel Lining drill, but with only 4 bumpers spaced 90 degrees apart. Big distinct turns, and more obvious targets.

    Evan
    "Prepare your dog in such a manner that the work he is normally called upon to do under-whelms him, not overwhelms him." ~ Evan Graham

    “People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.”

    ― George Bernard Shaw


    The Smartwork System for Retriever Training (link)
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  6. #16
    Senior Member Mary Lynn Metras's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evan View Post
    Yes. And for you it would be a good suggestion to make it a 4-way drill; a Wagon Wheel Lining drill, but with only 4 bumpers spaced 90 degrees apart. Big distinct turns, and more obvious targets.

    Evan
    Wagon Wheels great for getting the dog to move with you and your cues on either side.
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  7. #17
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    It's going to feel very strange... eye-hand coordination and all that. Even though it is heeling and push/pulling on my dominant side. Can you teach an old central nervous system new tricks?

    But happily, beginning with a puppy... the skill has time to evolve. Doesn't have to happen in a rush. We'll learn together.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Evan's Avatar
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    If you believe you can, you can.

    Evan
    "Prepare your dog in such a manner that the work he is normally called upon to do under-whelms him, not overwhelms him." ~ Evan Graham

    “People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.”

    ― George Bernard Shaw


    The Smartwork System for Retriever Training (link)
    http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?...59&ref=profile

  9. #19
    Junior Member 6x6Bulls's Avatar
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    Thank you Evan, your article helped to clarify how two sided healing helps a dog to be successful.

    I am an inexperienced trainer, training my second dog, and the first that I will heal on both sides. Aside from the examples in Evan’s article, can you guys give me scenarios of why you heal on a certain side? I assume the top dogs do not have a dominant side, they are equally comfortable on both sides of the handler. In a trial/test will you heal the dog on a different side to pick up different marks or the blinds? How do you choose which side you will run the dog from as you are approaching the test? Do you adjust based on how other dogs complete the test? Just a few questions, thank you for the clarification.
    "However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results."
    Winston Churchill

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