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Thread: insurance should a pro trainer have

  1. #1

    Default insurance should a pro trainer have

    Looking into sending my pup to a pro trainer what kind of insurance should I be looking for? My self and the trainer.
    Last edited by wckrishet; 11-02-2013 at 10:44 AM.

  2. #2

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    Does this mean that many of the pros don't have insurance that would cover my pup if something happens to him.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Lonnie Spann's Avatar
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    I firmly believe that if one declares one's status as a "professional trainer" and trains dogs for the public then they should at the least:

    1. Sign a written contract with each client (drafted by an attorney who practices in the State that the "Pro" is providing services);

    2. Have liability insurance to cover the trainer in the event the unforseen happens;

    3. Form a LLC for the kennel.

    Lonnie Spann
    DISCLAIMER: The above post is the opinionated and biased view of your's truly, Lonnie Spann, and is in no way intended to reflect the opinions or views of the unfortunate individuals named below who just happen to be doomed with guilt by association.

    Member of CAHRC and North AL HRC. I train with AND AM FRIENDS WITH: Fishduck, Laidback, Splash_Em, RF2, Drake2014, Claimsadj, Hooked on Quackers, RookieTrainer and Roseberry.

    HRCH Spann's Quacker Jack "Jack" 500 Pt. Club (New & IMPROVED jacket).

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    Senior Member Rnd's Avatar
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    Lonnie, All good advise for the "Pro/kennel owner"

    However correct me if I'm wrong. (I'm not an attorney but believe you may be) Doesn't the law look at dogs and animals in general as all being about the same in value.

    A horse is worth X dollars if it's a saddle horse or a million dollar race horse. Replacement price is that of a new one ie. a foal/colt not a trained horse.

    A retriever is worth the purchase price of a new one....A puppy not a fully trained open dog..

    The point I'm trying to make (and not doing very well at) is I don't think the court will award the true value or cost of a fully trained animal. Only the replacement cost of a new one.

    A dog is a dog weather trained or not....

    So if the OP's question is what happens if my dog ends up dead, or crippled?? I don't think any insurance company that the Trainer/kennel would have would compensate him/her any more than the cost of what they deem a new puppy would be worth..



    I do think there maybe some insurance available to the "Owner of the animal" that would protect in that case.

    What are your thoughts??

    Thank you, Randy


    P.S. I tried to quote Lonnie Spann's post but it didn't quote ????
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    Senior Member huntinman's Avatar
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    If you read Lonnie's post, he says Liability coverage that covers the "trainer".
    Bill Davis

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    I firmly believe that if one declares one's status as a "professional trainer" and trains dogs for the public then they should at the least:

    1. Sign a written contract with each client (drafted by an attorney who practices in the State that the "Pro" is providing services);

    2. Have liability insurance to cover the trainer in the event the unforseen happens;

    3. Form a LLC for the kennel.
    What advantage is it to the customer if a training business is LLC compared to sole proprietorship?

    Pete
    John 5 :30
    I can of my own self do nothing ,as I hear , I judge,,and my judgement is just, because I seek not my own will,,but the will of the father which hath sent me
    John 7:16 -- Jesus answered them and said my doctrine is not mine, but his that sent me.
    mark 16:9 -- So then after the lord had spoken unto them,he was received up in heaven, and sat on the right hand of God
    I Tim. 2:5 --For there is one God and one mediator between God and man ,, the man Christ Jesus

  7. #7
    Senior Member Raymond Little's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete View Post
    What advantage is it to the customer if a training business is LLC compared to sole proprietorship?

    Pete
    Limited Liability Corporation; liability should not pass through corp to second party. In the event of a liability suit, only assets inside of LLC are available for judgement. Easy senerio; client A dog bites little Timmy the neighbor, suit would name trainer and owner under LLC.

    physical damage would come from owner of dog since you can't insure something you don't own and I haven't heard of Bailee coverage for dogs. Randy, some insurance companies will pay fair market value just depends on what they determine. My former company paid for several dogs killed when lightning struck their kennel. The adjuster called me for help in determining claim.
    Last edited by Raymond Little; 11-03-2013 at 11:40 AM.
    "Character is doing the right thing when nobody is watching"....J.C. Watts

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    Senior Member Russ's Avatar
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    The OP is a client, so it is not in his best interest to shield the trainer from personal liability through an LLC or corporation.

    Most commercial property policies today have some coverage for property of others in the care, custody and control of the insured. Specialized kennel policies are available that include animal floater options covering client dogs. I suspect most of the top field trial pros are underinsured as the value of the dogs on their truck exceed the limits offered by the standard carriers.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Raymond Little's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Russ View Post
    The OP is a client, so it is not in his best interest to shield the trainer from personal liability through an LLC or corporation.

    Most commercial property policies today have some coverage for property of others in the care, custody and control of the insured. Specialized kennel policies are available that include animal floater options covering client dogs. I suspect most of the top field trial pros are underinsured as the value of the dogs on their truck exceed the limits offered by the standard carriers.
    True but ISO forms do not include animals on CGL's. There should be IM floaters out there that properly value k9 athletes just as they do equine athletes. Race horses have been insurable for years and are written on very good paper with declared value.
    "Character is doing the right thing when nobody is watching"....J.C. Watts

  10. #10
    Senior Member Lonnie Spann's Avatar
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    Value of the dog (in Alabama) I am sure the plaintiff would be suing for replacement cost of an animal of equal value to the one that was lost. Is a MH with an FC stud from FC x FC breedind only worth the value of a 7 week old puppy from a FC x FC breeding?

    I had a client who was hit by a car while riding a horse. Client suffered minor injuries, horse suffered life-long injuries which prevented her from being bred, from being ridden, etc. We sued for loss of the value of the horse at the time of the loss, loss of future income from planned breedings, etc. we settled prior to trial AND received considerably more than what many would consider to be the "value" of the horse.

    LLC to protect the Pro's personal assets from the business assets. I regularly form LLC's in Alabama for less than $1,000.

    In today's society I wouldn't dare open ANY kind of business without forming and entity for the business, i.e. LLC.


    Lonnie Spann
    Last edited by Lonnie Spann; 11-03-2013 at 12:32 PM.
    DISCLAIMER: The above post is the opinionated and biased view of your's truly, Lonnie Spann, and is in no way intended to reflect the opinions or views of the unfortunate individuals named below who just happen to be doomed with guilt by association.

    Member of CAHRC and North AL HRC. I train with AND AM FRIENDS WITH: Fishduck, Laidback, Splash_Em, RF2, Drake2014, Claimsadj, Hooked on Quackers, RookieTrainer and Roseberry.

    HRCH Spann's Quacker Jack "Jack" 500 Pt. Club (New & IMPROVED jacket).

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