The RetrieverTraining.Net Forums The Retriever Academy
Total Retriever Training with Mike Lardy
Hawkeye Media Gunners Up Tritronics Outdoor Media
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Maintaining standards while hunting

  1. #1
    Member Cyclone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    34

    Default Maintaining standards while hunting

    What would you do in this scenario? Hunting with your dog from a blind about 10 yards from the water's edge. You kill a duck that falls in deep water, 30 yards from shore. Your dog breaks as you're shooting, and by the time you get the whistle in your mouth the dog is at the water's edge. No boat and no way to get the bird except to have the dog pick it up. I see 3 possibilities:

    1. let the dog get it and encourage future breaking.
    2. call the dog back and have a short, intense "discussion" with him. Then send him for the bird.
    3. leave the bird (wanton waste).

    1 and 3 are unacceptable, and 2 doesn't seem that great either - the dog still gets to pick up the bird. Are there other options?
    HRCH Royer's Mighty Riverman Murphy (Murphy)
    HRCH Dakota's Element of Surprise (Ellie)

  2. #2
    Senior Member MooseGooser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    7,385

    Default

    Like a HT, be pro active and lightly restrain an unsteady dog, or a dog that most likely WILL become unsteady.
    Junior Hts hold the collar.

    when hunting, handler doesn't shoot, OR, Stake the dog
    It is far easier to spit on the work of others than it is to produce something better yourself.
    Brynmoors Prairie Sage JH ​(Sage) Just a dang fool huntin Dawg
    HRCH Calypso Seven Bales High SH (Bailey)
    HR Calypso Zoomin Loosies Mad Hader (Maddi) We loved you baby. R.I.P.
    FlatLanders Broken Pistol Ricochet SH (Flinch)


    My Christian Name is Michael Baker..
    I have gone by "Gooser" since I was a "gossling"

  3. #3
    Administrator Chris Atkinson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Mount Zion, IL
    Posts
    6,967

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclone View Post
    What would you do in this scenario? Hunting with your dog from a blind about 10 yards from the water's edge. You kill a duck that falls in deep water, 30 yards from shore. Your dog breaks as you're shooting, and by the time you get the whistle in your mouth the dog is at the water's edge. No boat and no way to get the bird except to have the dog pick it up. I see 3 possibilities:

    1. let the dog get it and encourage future breaking.
    2. call the dog back and have a short, intense "discussion" with him. Then send him for the bird.
    3. leave the bird (wanton waste).

    1 and 3 are unacceptable, and 2 doesn't seem that great either - the dog still gets to pick up the bird. Are there other options?
    Yes. Leave the bird lay there...keep an eye on it. Be prepared to run a blind later. Watch where it drifts. It may come back to the shore and you can go get it yourself.

    If the bird is stone-dead, and there's not too much wind/current there's no reason to let pup get it anytime soon.

    The longer pup has to wait before getting to pick it up, the less chance there is that he just learned breaking is acceptable in real hunting.

    If pup is locked in on it, let him think about it for a long, long time.... If the bird is drifting away, and pup can see it, you can get a nice long distance blind with a high degree of success in an "out to sea" setting.

    Lots of things to consider and lots of reasons the above may not work. But for the scenario your brief post paints in my mind's eye, that's a way I saw it.
    "Determining and applying the criteria for when and when not to use correction is the essence of the art of dog training. I make a distinction between a mistake and a lack of effort." - Mike Lardy - Volume I "After Collar Conditioning"

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Gloucester,Va
    Posts
    1,295

    Default

    If it were me, I'd not say a word, let the dog finish the retrieve- no praise, no emotion, re-SIT the dog and put myself in a position to re-enforce so to make it really count.
    I'd get back in the blind, hit the duckcall, shoulder the gun, and the split second he breaks from SIT, I'd go to his little hiney,(arse) with that "intense discussion"- make it count.

    Then back at home afterwards at the next opportunity I'd get him in the yard with some refreshing O.B. lessons.
    Last edited by Swampbilly; 11-05-2013 at 02:51 PM.
    Dawgs are like Savings Accounts-
    You only get out of 'em what you put into 'em.

  5. #5
    Senior Member John Robinson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Bigfork, Montana
    Posts
    3,398

    Default

    My very steady field trial dogs, (hope I didn't just jinx myself), break on the first bird every hunting season. I am expecting it so I put my e-collar on before we hit the blind. I am usually hunting with someone else, so for that first flight I sit back, transmitter in hand while my partner shoots. Many times my dog will break on the shot even if he misses. Regardless, I yell "SIT!", hit him with a big correction and recall, then send. That one correction is usually all I need for the whole season, I usually don't even put a collar on them after that. The dogs totally understand the rules in training and trials, but think things might be different in the duck blind until you show them they aren't.

  6. #6
    Member Cyclone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    34

    Default

    Thanks for the responses - all good ideas. Both of my dogs are rock steady in hunt tests. The younger one maintains that in the hunting blind, the older one loses his frickin mind as soon as realizes we're really hunting, not testing or training. It's my fault for letting him get away with it the first couple seasons, now I've got to fix it. Problem is he's an 85 pound male Chessie - Chessie's aren't hard to train, but they are damn hard to re-train.
    HRCH Royer's Mighty Riverman Murphy (Murphy)
    HRCH Dakota's Element of Surprise (Ellie)

  7. #7
    Senior Member Hunt'EmUp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,029

    Default

    I'd Let it go; but be prepared to correct on the next bird. Trainers aren't ever perfect; they make mistakes, but if the foundation is there you can correct it the next time .
    "They's Just DAWGS"
    "Hunting is a skill to be learned whether you do it early or late it still needs to be learned"
    "I train dogs, Not papers"

    GMRH HRCH Quick MH (most importantly Duck/Upland Enthusiast) Rip. July-2014
    MHR HRCH Lakota MH (most importantly Upland/Duck Enthusiast)
    HR Storm.. the Pup (Beginning Upland & Waterfowl Enthusiast)

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Gloucester,Va
    Posts
    1,295

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hunt'EmUp View Post
    I'd Let it go; but be prepared to correct on the next bird. Trainers aren't ever perfect; they make mistakes, but if the foundation is there you can correct it the next time .
    That's the way I see it.
    By the time you can get a meaningfull correction in, he's already dinked 'ya and the best opportune time has really passed. (Just don't tell the dog that )

    Would just rather catch that situational learner in a better "learning situation".
    Dawgs are like Savings Accounts-
    You only get out of 'em what you put into 'em.

  9. #9
    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,195

    Default

    I found with my last dog that he was more apt to break from behind the blind when he could see the bird hit but not the location of the fall. Outside the blind no problem. Set back 40 yards while lay-out hunting no problem. Never broke on a test or training flyer.
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •