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Thread: Cloning a special dog

  1. #1
    Senior Member Mark Teahan's Avatar
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    Default Cloning a special dog

    Anyone thought about it?
    Cost?
    Is it being done?
    Legal?
    What is needed to do cloning?
    Would you really get the same dog you had if done?
    Same markings, smarts, temperament, as in the same dog in all respects??

    Would you do it?

  2. #2
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    You might get the same dog yours was on the day it was born, but everything and everyone is the sum of their life experiences. You can never recreate that! Actually pictures I have seen of cloned cat offspring(?) had different coat markings from the original.

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    Should be absolutely identical in every genotypic aspect... including appearance provided you trained the same and fed the same and so on. BUT... I am not sure these cloned animals have a decent life expectancy. I haven't followed the science that much but I believe their cells have shorter telomeres, i.e., their DNA poops out sooner than a naturally occuring animal. Maybe someone can correct me on that.

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    Junior Member Striker's Avatar
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    Why do it? Go with a good breeder and count on the genetics and training to make another good dog with it's own unique traits (which may be what created the dog you want to clone). What makes some dogs so special is their personality combined with what was created through breeding and training; you might as well go with a new dog that already has the latter two since the first is going to be a "wild card" regardless of cloning or not.

    My current dog is special to me for many reasons. Mainly the fact that we trained each other (I got her when I was still pretty young myself) and she has always had quite a bit of "personality." That said, I wouldn't want to clone her and hold her "puppy" (for want of a better word) to her standards instead of letting it develop into it's own "self."

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    Senior Member Jennifer Henion's Avatar
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    Despite being totally enamored with my current prospect, I would not do it. I think there would be some "baggage" and false expectations of the dog because you really cannot replicate the nurture side of the equation. Plus, I like the idea of a new set of genes to work with: The surprise and the challenge.

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    Its been done, Mark, and as I recall the cost estimate was about $100,000. Its been several years since I read that, though, so my memory could be faulty. And Dogluvah is right - the genotype will be identical. The phenotype will be different. There is so much research now about epigenetics - changes that happen in DNA expression even though its identical DNA. That can have major effects. After development, when born, immediately all life experiences are different. So, its the same dog DNA-wise, but the expression of DNA can be considerably different, and all those life experiences that shapes a dogs behavior and personality, and all the effects of mothers care, will be different. So the clone will probably be very similar in some ways, and very different in others.

    You thinking Trap needs a twin?
    Chuck

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    Senior Member Mark Teahan's Avatar
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    Yeah Chuck.
    He's the best dog I've eerie had. His personality, his demeanor, the way he and I click.
    I would always compare another dog to him, and don't think I would be happy.

    Im not wanting a super retrieve for competition, but just another goofy HIM.

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    Be careful. Remember what happened to Mr. Bigglesworth.

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    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer Henion View Post
    I would not do it. I think there would be some "baggage" and false expectations of the dog because you really cannot replicate the nurture side of the equation.
    I wouldn't either. Seems laden with false expectations and strikes me as emotionally unhealthy.
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Teahan View Post
    Yeah Chuck.
    He's the best dog I've eerie had. His personality, his demeanor, the way he and I click.
    I would always compare another dog to him, and don't think I would be happy.

    Im not wanting a super retrieve for competition, but just another goofy HIM.
    I think, Mark, that you'll find another dog will bond in a different way. The key for me has been having another dog in the pack before the old one goes. When Chama died - my second dog since high school and since I'd quit traveling so much so that I could have dogs - if I hadn't had another dog in the house I wouldn't have had another. But I'm so glad I did, because each is an individual and each brings their own to a relationship. You can't compare, its not fair to either.
    Chuck

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