The RetrieverTraining.Net Forums The Retriever Academy
Total Retriever Training with Mike Lardy
Hawkeye Media Gunners Up Tritronics Outdoor Media
Page 2 of 17 FirstFirst 123412 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 164

Thread: To Much Drive?

  1. #11
    Senior Member BonMallari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    LV/CenTex/Idaho
    Posts
    12,579

    Default

    its only too much if the perceived drive exceeds the capabilities of the people or persons trying to harness and channel that drive into some workable form of an animal using conventional humane methods...urban dictionary describes such a dog as bat schiat crazy
    All my Exes live in Texas

    Quote Originally Posted by lanse brown View Post
    A few things that I learned still ring true. "Lanse when you get a gift, say thank you and walk away. When you get a screwing walk away. You are going to get a lot more screwings than gifts"

  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,998

    Default

    I have one now I got in a few weeks ago. Yelps in the water because her legs won't swim as fast as her brain wants her to get there. Yelps on land on the take off...and I mean take like a rocket. However she is smart and learns quickly. Working on OB I the yard now and FF soon. Fun to train for me. I have another young one of my own I'm looking forward to FF. If I have a bumper in my hand it better be high enough she can't reach it or she's gonna get it. I had one just like her a few yrs ago and had to hide the bumper behind my back just to get an ear pinch on her.

  3. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    North West TN
    Posts
    37

    Default

    I have one now that is 19 months old. She will kick mud in your face on marks or leaving on a blind. I would suggest obedience, obedience, and more obedience. Not only does my pup have lots of drive she has manners as well.
    Proverbs 3:5-6

  4. #14
    Senior Member TonyLattuca's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Ft. Worth, TX
    Posts
    166

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by labman63 View Post
    I have one now I got in a few weeks ago. Yelps in the water because her legs won't swim as fast as her brain wants her to get there. Yelps on land on the take off...and I mean take like a rocket. However she is smart and learns quickly. Working on OB I the yard now and FF soon. Fun to train for me. I have another young one of my own I'm looking forward to FF. If I have a bumper in my hand it better be high enough she can't reach it or she's gonna get it. I had one just like her a few yrs ago and had to hide the bumper behind my back just to get an ear pinch on her.
    You just described my pup to the tee. Yelps on water marks on the way out, off line if theirs a gunner, and tries robbing the bumper walking. I love this little guy and probably the easiest pup I've ever trained.

  5. #15
    Senior Member TIM DOANE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    hudsonville mi.
    Posts
    880

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mmoe View Post
    When or can a dog have to much drive? Can to much drive be corrected through proper obedience training? Any suggestions would be apprecieated.
    How old is the dog? What exactly is the problem?
    Tim Doane , Kingseed Kennels
    GRHRCH UH Hunters Marsh King Elijah MNH QAA "Ely"
    GRHRCH Kingseeds Little Miss Dangerous MNH QAA " Stella "
    HRCH Kingseeds Queen Of Grace MH " Hannah "
    Kingseeds She's A Classic " Layla "
    www.kingseedkennels.com

  6. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Macon Mississippi
    Posts
    81

    Default

    To much drive hmmmm. If you start a puppy off right letting it know u have control from the first time u send it from a heel position and not letting it break if it does break and your using a 30 foot check cord he will learn not to break he will also learn that daddy has control over me and I don't get my reward if I don't obey. If you build on that and never let him get his way I believe u can control the drive

  7. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    1,107

    Default

    Ahhh... getting to the crotch of the matter (as Archie Bunker would say.) We're touching on the true fear and loathing of the amateur. Serious amateurs (people who love the dog game but have lives and responsibilities) recognize the necessity of buying a dog/puppy bred to have "go" but worry about instilling the right amount of "no". "No" in the right amount at the right time.

    Since I am one of those amateurs I would like to ask the assembled experts if using the Hillman techniques with the very young fire-breather can produce the dog we want. I seriously don't want to screw my anticipated puppy up.

  8. #18
    Senior Member TonyLattuca's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Ft. Worth, TX
    Posts
    166

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 1tulip View Post
    Ahhh... getting to the crotch of the matter (as Archie Bunker would say.) We're touching on the true fear and loathing of the amateur. Serious amateurs (people who love the dog game but have lives and responsibilities) recognize the necessity of buying a dog/puppy bred to have "go" but worry about instilling the right amount of "no". "No" in the right amount at the right time.

    Since I am one of those amateurs I would like to ask the assembled experts if using the Hillman techniques with the very young fire-breather can produce the dog we want. I seriously don't want to screw my anticipated puppy up.
    I took mine through it and it went well. It made formal training much easier because he was familiar with much of the training already.

  9. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    2,802

    Default

    There is a lot more to a dog than prey drive. Temperament is comprised of all the drives and the dogs sensitivities to its environment. No 2 dogs are alike.
    Focus and excitability are factors. High pack ,low pack factor in. High food low food factor in. And high prey low prey factor in and the sustainability of these drives during the process of goal satisfaction also factor in.

    Give me high pack,,,high food and high prey and sustainabilities of those drives along with high focus and low excitability and sensitive any day any time.
    High drive alone does not factor in because it is only a very small part of the equation. You need more info.

    Pete
    Last edited by Pete; 11-17-2013 at 12:27 PM.
    John 5 :30
    I can of my own self do nothing ,as I hear , I judge,,and my judgement is just, because I seek not my own will,,but the will of the father which hath sent me
    John 7:16 -- Jesus answered them and said my doctrine is not mine, but his that sent me.
    mark 16:9 -- So then after the lord had spoken unto them,he was received up in heaven, and sat on the right hand of God
    I Tim. 2:5 --For there is one God and one mediator between God and man ,, the man Christ Jesus

  10. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Cape Girardeau Mo.
    Posts
    1,365

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete View Post
    There is a lot more to a dog than prey drive. Temperament is comprised of all the drives and the dogs sensitivities to its environment. No 2 dogs are alike.
    Focus and excitability are factors. High pack ,low pack factor in. High food low food factor in. And high prey low prey factor in and the sustainability of these drives during the process of goal satisfaction also factor in.

    Give me high pack,,,high food and high prey and sustainabilities of those drives along with high focus and low excitability and sensitive any day any time.
    High drive alone does not factor in because it is only a very small part of the equation. You need more info.

    Pete
    I believe this is a big factor in determining if the dog is trainable ( teachable) ...The excitability is where the problem usually arises...the higher the dog gets the harder it is for some to calm the dog down...Some trainers have the knack of taking this out of the dog and others don't have it...Steve S
    "Your dog learns as much by doing his work right,by your praise and encouragement, as he does by your displeasure and correction." DLWalters

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •