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Thread: To Much Drive?

  1. #71
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    A dog can have a lot of desire/go and a great trainer but may be lacking THINK/BRAINS which cuts his career short. Mike Tyson is a good example.

  2. #72
    Senior Member kjrice's Avatar
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    See there is a difference, in statement, that no amateur can train a "true high-drive" dog versus a dog that is simply no fun, what you don't want in a competitive dog. a pure nutcase or washout (which is subjective). I've already wasted enough cycles...enjoy.
    A lot of people are afraid of heights. Not me, I'm afraid of widths.

  3. #73
    Member T-bone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RookieTrainer View Post
    You may be taking it a little further than I intended. While ideally I would like to run my dog like a race car - right on the edge of out-of-control - you do want to stay out of the wall the vast majority of the time. In my situation, I pretty well know at this point that the wall is in our future when we start a hunt test, so we are going back to the design shop to hopefully get him to decide to maintain himself on the right side of the control equation.

    Ironically, the program I am on is basically using his intense desire for birds against him. To get what he wants, he has to give me what I want first.
    We have one that runs like a race car and right on the edge of out of control. Has taken a lot of work and counsel (by /Paul) to help us try to keep him grounded. He'll be running at the Master level next year IF we can keep him healthy. The race car is fun to watch until it hits the wall. We've experienced that to the tune of a concussion and a major shoulder injury. All the layoff time for healing and rehab means big gaps in training. We are amateurs and he is a lot of dog. Ironically, he's a wonderful house dog and amazing hunter and we can't imagine life without the little bugger.

    Enjoy the ride (and it's one hell of a ride)
    Behind every success is effort. Behind every effort is passion. Behind every passion is someone with the courage to try!

  4. #74
    Senior Member RookieTrainer's Avatar
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    It is an interesting journey. I really wish mine could talk so he could give me some sort of audible warning. Like "Hey pops, watch this!!!"

    Quote Originally Posted by T-bone View Post
    We have one that runs like a race car and right on the edge of out of control. Has taken a lot of work and counsel (by /Paul) to help us try to keep him grounded. He'll be running at the Master level next year IF we can keep him healthy. The race car is fun to watch until it hits the wall. We've experienced that to the tune of a concussion and a major shoulder injury. All the layoff time for healing and rehab means big gaps in training. We are amateurs and he is a lot of dog. Ironically, he's a wonderful house dog and amazing hunter and we can't imagine life without the little bugger.

    Enjoy the ride (and it's one hell of a ride)
    Steve Wyatt

    HR Belle's Rolling Big Rig "Jimmy"

  5. #75
    Senior Member Aussie's Avatar
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    Note: There are problems with this definition in both the behavioral and genetics communities because we cannot measure or even accurately define one of the key parts of the operational definition: “instinctual”/“instinctive”. Also, if dogs can be considered “low drive” the response cannot be exaggerated, and the ability to enhance or diminish a response is a key part of the operational definition of drive. Finally, while you may easily compare 2 dogs in front of you where one has relatively “higher drive” than the other, this type of relativistic comparison cannot be quantitatively tested and validated within or between observers, and does not provide a phenotype that can be used in genetic analyses, or behavioral tests to improve technique.

    Synonyms: n/a
    Scientific Usage: There are problems with this definition in both the behavioral and genetics communities, see Notes.
    Operational Usage: Drive is the propensity of a dog to exhibit a particular pattern of behaviors when faced with particular stimuli. Drives are triggered by these particular stimuli and expressed in a typical and predictable way that is associated with the particular stimulus. Drives can be enhanced or diminished through experience (e.g., training, environment, et cetera), but they cannot be created or eliminated. Traditionally defined in the working dog literature as an exaggerated, instinctual response to certain stimuli and situations. Drive is most narrowly and clearly defined as a willingness, vigor, or enthusiasm to engage in certain behavior, contexts, or situations.
    Relevant Discipline: Explosive, General Training, Guide Dogs, Narcotic, Other Detection Dogs, Search & Recovery, Search & Rescue, Service Dog, Tracking/Trailing
    Citation: http://www.swgdog.org/

    Example: n/a
    Field trial labradors, the wind beneath my wings,

    sometimes poop under my boots.

  6. #76
    Senior Member KNorman's Avatar
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    Generally, in my experience, when you see someone crowing about their dog being a firebreather, it usually means a newbie who's impressed by their dog's desire w/o a clue how the rein them in.

    Line work is critical. Doesn't matter what venue you're running.

  7. #77
    Senior Member BJGatley's Avatar
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    So there lies the problem....Is high drive subjective to the retriever world? You can harness the drive to your advantage if you know what to do. On the other hand, it can impede your progress, if you don't know what to do.... Is it best to seek those you know what to do? Would it be fair in your best interest to....

    Edit to post: What is the end result or goal of the future handler....Hopefully said handier will stay with dog and be patient and do whatever it takes to have dog excel or maybe need help for that as well. End result is....a journey together....
    Last edited by BJGatley; 11-22-2013 at 09:57 PM.

  8. #78
    Senior Member BonMallari's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BJGatley View Post
    So there lies the problem....Is high drive subjective to the retriever world? You can harness the drive to your advantage if you know what to do. On the other hand, it can impede your progress, if you don't know what to do.... Is it best to seek those you know what to do? Would it be fair in your best interest to....
    of course it is.....have you ever heard someone describe their dog as " my dog is a piggish slug who walks to blinds like he does to marks "
    All my Exes live in Texas

    Quote Originally Posted by lanse brown View Post
    A few things that I learned still ring true. "Lanse when you get a gift, say thank you and walk away. When you get a screwing walk away. You are going to get a lot more screwings than gifts"

  9. #79
    Senior Member BJGatley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BonMallari View Post
    of course it is.....have you ever heard someone describe their dog as " my dog is a piggish slug who walks to blinds like he does to marks "
    I really believe you could come up with a better answer than that.....

  10. #80
    Senior Member BonMallari's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BJGatley View Post
    I really believe you could come up with a better answer than that.....
    I did but I deleted it because it involved friends dogs and I dont do that to friends,maybe tell you the story in person now that I know you live in Idaho
    All my Exes live in Texas

    Quote Originally Posted by lanse brown View Post
    A few things that I learned still ring true. "Lanse when you get a gift, say thank you and walk away. When you get a screwing walk away. You are going to get a lot more screwings than gifts"

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