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Thread: But will the Radical Right Listen ? Smart money says NO!

  1. #1
    Senior Member Golddogs's Avatar
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    Default But will the Radical Right Listen ? Smart money says NO!

    If they don't it may be 8 years of Hillary:

    My Fix for What Ails the GOP
    With the Republicans’ anemic approval ratings, the conservative cohost of MSNBC’s Morning Joe calls on his party to reject extremism By Joe Scarborough

    For the GOP to win big again, it must take William F. Buckley’s ruthlessly pragmatic approach to primary elections. In Buckley’s view “conservatism, except when it is expressed in pure idealism, takes into account reality.” That means we have to stop electing amateurs who serve as little more than ideological indulgences, who exploit resentments that play well enough among the base, but whose positions make them nonviable in general elections. Had the party followed Buckley’s advice in 2010 and supported the most electable conservatives instead of the most ideologically extreme, Republicans would now control the United States Senate and Democratic leader Harry Reid would be in retirement in Nevada.

    This is a lesson I learned the hard way: I spoke out against the possibility of Colin Powell’s presidential candidacy in 1996 because his political moderation was so off- putting to me. The thought that he could be the standard-bearer of my Republican Party was offensive. But watching the retired general on Meet the Press in recent years has made me understand why Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush drafted him to a be a critical player in their administrations. In retrospect I realize how much better the GOP would have fared against Bill Clinton in 1996 if I had not let my hopes for a conservative stalwart get in the way of our best hope to beat Clinton. “If it’s just going to represent the far right wing of the political spectrum, I think the party is in difficulty,” said Powell this year. “ I’m a moderate, but I’m still a Republican.” This war hero, who has made history of his own by becoming the first African-American chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and secretary of state, should still be one of the leading voices in the party because of, not in spite of, his centrist political philosophy. Republicans can kick moderates like General Powell out of the party’s mainstream and drive them into the arms of the Democratic Party every four years, or they can leave their ideological comfort zone, work aggressively to expand their political coalitions, and start stealing swing voters away from Democrats like Hillary Clinton. Unfortunately, the Republican Party of the moment bears little resemblance to the party of Ronald Reagan, who would have responded to Powell’s critiques of the Republican Party with an allhands- on-deck effort to win the war hero back. That’s because President Reagan lived by the belief that “ just because I’m your friend 80 percent of the time doesn’t make me your enemy 20 percent of the time.”

    If the Republican party is big enough to reach out to disaffected moderates like Colin Powell, then it will be big enough to win the White House in 2016, even if Hillary Clinton is the Democratic nominee. The question is whether the GOP will go the way of Buckley or Glenn Beck. Republicans can win again and we will. And we can do it by following the right paths of Ronald Reagan and Dwight Eisenhower. We can do it by fighting for the core principles of conservatism and emphasizing values that most Americans agree with. There will also be times when we will follow the lead of Reagan and Eisenhower by putting principled pragmatism before ideological battles that undermine our ability to win elections, elect majorities, and take back control of the White House. But time is wasting. Hillary Clinton’s supporters are already preparing for political battle. Next time, we’d better be prepared to win. There is no substitute for victory, and I for one am damn tired of my party losing presidential elections.
    Never trust a dog to watch your food!

  2. #2
    Senior Member BonMallari's Avatar
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    as much as WF Buckley is correct the R party has tried that approach with its last two flag bearers, of course then most will say that McCain and Romney were not Conservatives and they would be right based on the spectrum of the candidates offered in that political cycle...

    Then we get into the semantics of who is "electable"

    IMO the most electable Conservative never seems to survive the primary process and the party is left with a wishy washy candidate that is anything BUT conservative...Then you also have to fend off the Fiscal Conservatives vs the Social Conservatives, and the social issues always seem to be the backbreaker
    All my Exes live in Texas

    Quote Originally Posted by lanse brown View Post
    A few things that I learned still ring true. "Lanse when you get a gift, say thank you and walk away. When you get a screwing walk away. You are going to get a lot more screwings than gifts"

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    Senior Member Gerry Clinchy's Avatar
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    Hey, did you see that a candidate backed by Duck Dynasty just won a special election in Louisiana?

    As we beat up on "far right", both candidates in the race were against abortion and big govt spending, but the winning candidate was "pragmatic" in approach.

    Have we been brainwashed into believing that "the far right" is what the liberals tell us they are? Any small misstep by a conservative is used to label them as extreme ... and we seem to buy right into the liberal talking points on that childishness.


    There are wingnuts in every political group, not necessarily more of them on the far right than the far left, or even among so-called centrists.

    I actually don't watch or listen to Glenn Beck, but since he is so often raised as one of the nutcases, I picked up a copy of his "Common Sense" at a thrift store to see what he was about. That book is NOT some equivalent to "Mein Kampf" for the right. He was one of the first to point out the influence of George Soros. It's kind of hard to deny how much $ Soros has put into the liberal cause. While liberals continually hammer on the Koch brothers, you don't ever hear them saying anything about Soros.


    Debbie W-Schultz has to be one of the big wingnuts of the liberals ... and she is chair of the their DNC, for God's sake! You don't see Ds eating her alive for her dumbness. They just sort of ignore her and probably hope she sucks in some of the low-info voters for them.

    Rush and Sara Palin are often disowned by conservatives. Maybe we should just take a page out of the liberal book and leave them alone, and spend that energy on the liberal nutcases?

    D's never renege on their agenda or unity. We often say R's snatch defeat from the jaws of victory. I think that is because the D's stay unified, even with their dumbest members. However, I do hope that mindless unity will come back to bite them in the behind in Nov 2014. We talk of disunity of the Rs on immigration and the shutdown ... but now as those vulnerable D's face election in 2014 the D unity is cracking. The D's may present a unified front to the public, but there is more fracturing beneath the surface than we may suspect.
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    Senior Member BonMallari's Avatar
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    the members here on the RTF are a prime example of how separated we are on the right..in the last election cycle there were some that backed Newt, others backed Perry and then we saw the early states give us Romney..the problem that I have with the primary process is that I dont feel that the lineup of the early states represent what the overall mood of the country really is...the process was all but mathematically finished before some of the bigger states voted..IMO I would rather see a national primary so we all vote the same day and then if no candidate receives an overwhelming majority then let them battle it out..I dont want Iowa and South Carolina being the barometer for the Party or the country
    All my Exes live in Texas

    Quote Originally Posted by lanse brown View Post
    A few things that I learned still ring true. "Lanse when you get a gift, say thank you and walk away. When you get a screwing walk away. You are going to get a lot more screwings than gifts"

  5. #5
    Senior Member huntinman's Avatar
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    That's funny. Joe Scarborough... The voice of conservatism? Another liberal media type trying to hoodwink the R's into doing it their way. And why not? It has gotten them McCain and Romney.
    Bill Davis

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    Senior Member Gerry Clinchy's Avatar
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    I think a large part of the disunity of the Rs is that no candidate of clear leadership quality emerged. I know I liked the freshness of Cain at first, but even before the "scandal" I had come to the conclusion that he wasn't really the answer. I liked Newt's ability to be quick on his feet, but still did not trust his ability to be POTUS. Romney was the least of the evils, and there was hope that he had learned some lessons from his stint as Gov of MA.

    If the Rs can find the leadership quality among their possibilities, then I don't think it matters if that person is against abortion (actually Christie is) or has a more liberal attitude about it (though most in both parties seem to be against third-trimester abortion, and even that never came up about Obama) ... but I think it would be hard for a candidate to succeed if he/she didn't support 2nd Amendment rights or fiscal conservatism.

    We've let Ds define "hard right" as being diametrically opposed to everything liberal. This is not true. Many who are against 3rd trimester abortion are in favor of contraception, although there are some who are totally against any abortions and also contraception. That religious position didn't keep Roman Catholics from voting for Obama.

    The Ds arguments for other issues, like the EPA take the same tack. If you dispute unreasonable regulations, you must be in favor of dirty water and air. That is just untrue, but any lie repeated often enough takes on the guise of being true. R's keep trying to add "reason" to such an argument, when the argument is based on an untruth to begin with. Just doesn't work.

    Yes, I would agree, Bon, that the primary process is very messy. Early results can influence what happens later. However, in the last election some early rising stars, fell down the heap in later primaries. Not sure how to remedy that. I wonder how this whole primary process evolved as it has. Is there some historian on the forum who has a handle on that?
    G.Clinchy@gmail.com
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    Senior Member Raymond Little's Avatar
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    GC, the dark horse candidate was not backed by the estblishment and had dems support. Our govnor has fallen in lock step with the R establishment. BJ will turn his head when the establishment wants to roll a head for political purposes. If conservatives want to march on they need to purge the party of establishment goons. Washington wasn't meant to make $$ and game the system. If we can teach the LIV this it will be easy to hold on to power indefinitely.
    "Character is doing the right thing when nobody is watching"....J.C. Watts

  8. #8
    Senior Member BonMallari's Avatar
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    the R voter has shown that they are "poor losers" when it comes to the primary process...EVERYONE has their own breaking point or litmus test for their candidate of choice, BUT as evidenced here on POTUS and across the country once their candidate of choice is eliminated the R voter has become disinterested and is unwilling to back the Party nominee..it showed on election day, many R voters stayed at home and accepted defeat
    All my Exes live in Texas

    Quote Originally Posted by lanse brown View Post
    A few things that I learned still ring true. "Lanse when you get a gift, say thank you and walk away. When you get a screwing walk away. You are going to get a lot more screwings than gifts"

  9. #9
    Senior Member huntinman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BonMallari View Post
    the R voter has shown that they are "poor losers" when it comes to the primary process...EVERYONE has their own breaking point or litmus test for their candidate of choice, BUT as evidenced here on POTUS and across the country once their candidate of choice is eliminated the R voter has become disinterested and is unwilling to back the Party nominee..it showed on election day, many R voters stayed at home and accepted defeat
    Bon, you are buying into the lib media talking points. The R's need to stand their ground on the issues they believe in and not be all washy washy. Conservatism works... The politicians are just too afraid of the media. Give me another 20 or 30 Mike Lee's, Ted Cruz', Rand Paul's over the guys who stick their finger in the air before answering a question. The voters would come out in droves.
    Bill Davis

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    Senior Member HPL's Avatar
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    I have been saying for years tha the center decides elections and the Republicans have lately been driving them away by insisting that any national candidate pass a litmus test on the most divisive issues (abortion, gay marriage, immigration, etc.) Personally I am pro choice for now (not pro abortion, only a real idiot would be pro abortion). I believe that what consenting adults do in their bedrooms is their business, but any long term, committed, mutually fidelitous couple should have equal rights under the law (never understand why the man and woman married 10 minutes (each for the 6th time) have more rights than the gay couple that has been together for 35 years). Those third rail issues should be off limits and the republicans should, and Newt has said, stand next to the numerous issues where the country is about 85% with us and SMILE!
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