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Thread: British field trials?

  1. #11
    Senior Member crackerd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul young View Post
    I, for one, am glad my hunts are not judged.
    - Paul
    Best training (or hunting) epigram ever.

    MG

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by crackerd View Post
    What's not expected of them, John, is water in any way, shape or fashion, unless it's found evaporated in the low-lying clouds over a British field trial.

    Viva la difference and all that, but that's the biggest difference - besides democracy (see Jeff Boston's comments above on how you "enter" a British FT) - in our trials v. theirs.

    MG
    Water does not feature very much in Field Trials, but it is used in our Working Tests. Not to the extent that you guys do it, but there will be water tests.

    One of the main differences between our Field Trials, and yours though, is that it is a completely natural, and random shoot. The retrieves are not 'set up' in any way like yours - the set up stuff is done, instead, on a more 'level playing field' through the medium of Working Tests, which are much more akin to your game - more technical, and more fake.

  3. #13

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    "the dog will be kept on the lead with the handler during the course of the day rather than in the truck. Therefore a dog could be on the lead for a couple of hours waiting to go in line"

    Does this mean a handler only has one dog to run in the event. Do you not have pros with many dogs to run?

    thanks,
    Ray K

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    SHR Deke of Sunnyburke SH
    HRCH UH Ray's Cotton Pickin' Jake MH, 500 Pt Club, 02-11
    SHR Callie May JH, 98-09
    SR Gus "The Wonder Dog" JH, 91-01

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Kirkpatrick View Post
    "the dog will be kept on the lead with the handler during the course of the day rather than in the truck. Therefore a dog could be on the lead for a couple of hours waiting to go in line"

    Does this mean a handler only has one dog to run in the event. Do you not have pros with many dogs to run?

    thanks,
    No, it's very hard to get a run in a trial. They are hugely over subscribed. A one day stake has 12 dogs and a two day stake just 24. It's a largely amateur sport, with only one handler really running dogs for more than one owner. On the whole, owners run their own dogs. And if they own more than one dog have to prioritise which one they will focus on for the season.

  5. #15
    Senior Member crackerd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kennel maiden View Post
    One of the main differences between our Field Trials, and yours though, is that it is a completely natural, and random shoot. The retrieves are not 'set up' in any way like yours - the set up stuff is done, instead, on a more 'level playing field' through the medium of Working Tests, which are much more akin to your game - more technical, and more fake.
    L, we prefer "more challenging, and more artifice." That, n.b., test the same traits we want to see in our (duck)hunting retrievers, a/k/a waterdogs.

    MG

  6. #16
    Senior Member rmilner's Avatar
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    I would guess that at least 90% of the Field Trial Champion titles earned in the UK are earned by dogs that are owned, trained and handled by their amateur (by our definition) owner. There is no delineation between amateur and professional in British retriever field trail rules. Professional (by our definition) trainers regularly judge field trials, frequently judge the IGL Championship, and serve on the Kennel Club Field Trials Sub-Committee and as members of Kennel Club Field Trials Liaison Council Representatives.

    There is however a restriction in the field trial rules of no more than two dogs for one handler in a given field trial.
    Robert Milner
    www.DuckhillKennels.com


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  7. #17
    Senior Member crackerd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmilner View Post
    Professional (by our definition) trainers regularly judge field trials, frequently judge the IGL Championship, and serve on the Kennel Club Field Trials Sub-Committee and as members of Kennel Club Field Trials Liaison Council Representatives.
    For a one-day event that's a "normal shooting day" and most often spans a dozen dogs. Don't think their clients would be too chuffed - and understandably so - if our pros gave up three or four days of training or trial time to judge a 100-dog open. Reckon, Mr. Purist?

    MG

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by kennel maiden View Post
    No, it's very hard to get a run in a trial. They are hugely over subscribed. A one day stake has 12 dogs and a two day stake just 24. It's a largely amateur sport, with only one handler really running dogs for more than one owner. On the whole, owners run their own dogs. And if they own more than one dog have to prioritise which one they will focus on for the season.
    Do you feel that politics ever enters into the "draw"?

  9. #19
    Senior Member rmilner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crackerd View Post
    For a one-day event that's a "normal shooting day" and most often spans a dozen dogs. Don't think their clients would be too chuffed - and understandably so - if our pros gave up three or four days of training or trial time to judge a 100-dog open. Reckon, Mr. Purist?

    MG
    I don't understand your question. Perhaps you could elaborate?
    Last edited by rmilner; 12-09-2013 at 04:17 PM.
    Robert Milner
    www.DuckhillKennels.com


    "When he stood up to speak, battalions of words issued forth from his mouth and scoured the countryside in search of an idea, and when they found one, they swiftly and thoroughly beat it to death." ---- -Anonymous

  10. #20
    Senior Member crackerd's Avatar
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    Oh, you "understand" it, or should I say your agenda understands it. Bill's asked another pretty pertinent question, even for a 12- or 24-dog trial; maybe you could elaborate on that.

    MG

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