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Thread: timidness when doing T-drills

  1. #11
    Junior Member derrekg123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlaineT View Post
    how long you been doing it? is he proficient? maybe one of those dogs that hates T work, and ready to move on.
    I have been working with him since Nov 13, he is proficient just was wondering if there was a way to "perk" him up to make it more fun for him.

  2. #12
    Junior Member derrekg123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BJGatley View Post
    OK...If I am reading you right....Then be careful of too many drills....It can sour a dog's attitude real quick...If I am reading this right.....
    Yes, I am aware... We took 2 weeks off and haven't ran him on the Ts in a while so things may have changed.

  3. #13
    Senior Member BlaineT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by derrekg123 View Post
    just was wondering if there was a way to "perk" him up to make it more fun for him.
    yeah, move on. Get him some live birds and have fun for a while. If he gets it, he gets it. some don't haul butt to the piles and hate it.
    HRCH Hudson River Drake (Possom)
    HRCH Hudson River Saying Grace (Gracie)

  4. #14
    Junior Member derrekg123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlaineT View Post
    how long you been doing it? is he proficient? maybe one of those dogs that hates T work, and ready to move on.
    I would think he hates T work because one of his previous trainers may have applied to much pressure on him will doing it. What else could I do for teaching/maintaining his overs?

  5. #15
    Senior Member BJGatley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by derrekg123 View Post
    I would think he hates T work because one of his previous trainers may have applied to much pressure on him will doing it. What else could I do for teaching/maintaining his overs?
    If at all else, dogs love baseball drills....Then maybe slowly go back and show your enthusiasm. Just a try....

  6. #16
    Junior Member derrekg123's Avatar
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    Thanks! Ill be sure to give it a try. You guys are great!

  7. #17
    Senior Member Gun_Dog2002's Avatar
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    Lots of marks run simple blinds. Leave something in it for him

    /Paul
    Paul Cantrell
    Black Ice Retrievers
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  8. #18
    Senior Member afdahl's Avatar
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    This could be totally off base--disadvantage of not being able to see the dog work--but are you sure he knows when he has done what you want? I am big on giving them a "good dog, here!" (Transitioning to "good dog" and a pickup whistle). Some dogs need it more than others, but good feedback can really help training progress and attitude. Imagine how tentative you would be if you never could tell if you were doing right or not.

    If I was training this dog I'd try taking a break from pressure on the send.

    There's a preference among some to keep praise to a minimum, thinking it's cool never to praise and a good dog shouldn't need it. I'd suggest treating that as an endpoint for a finished trial dog, and using every available tool while the dog is learning.

    Amy Dahl

  9. #19
    Senior Member gdgnyc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by afdahl View Post
    This could be totally off base--disadvantage of not being able to see the dog work--but are you sure he knows when he has done what you want? I am big on giving them a "good dog, here!" (Transitioning to "good dog" and a pickup whistle). Some dogs need it more than others, but good feedback can really help training progress and attitude. Imagine how tentative you would be if you never could tell if you were doing right or not.

    If I was training this dog I'd try taking a break from pressure on the send.

    There's a preference among some to keep praise to a minimum, thinking it's cool never to praise and a good dog shouldn't need it. I'd suggest treating that as an endpoint for a finished trial dog, and using every available tool while the dog is learning.

    Amy Dahl
    Would like to see video. Your dog might be confused as to what you want.

    What is the dog's body language telling you? What are you telling the dog?

    Also, avoid a mistake that many new trainers make IMO: Just because the dog has done a behavior correctly a few times does not mean that it was learned/trained.
    "I love the rod and gun and where they take me."

    "Do not judge a man until you have walked two moons in his moccasins."

  10. #20
    Senior Member Sharon Potter's Avatar
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    What Amy says makes sense. To add to that, I had a dog here last year that was so shut down that she wouldn't move off of a whistle sit to handle, and the pressure she'd had before she came here had totally shot her confidence. I started over, with lots of happy bumpers....and on the praise end of things, I was whooping and hollering and acting excited every time she would go, and lots of praise on the way back. I looked and felt like a total dufus...but it made a huge difference for her. I let a lot of things slide because I didn't want to make many corrections, just trying to get her fired up about the work again. As we worked out way back to simple casting, I'd start doing the cheerleader thing as soon as she would start to take the cast, and you could see how it helped her enthusiasm levels....it's like it gave her confidence that she was doing the right thing. And it was always done in very short sessions of just a few bumpers...maybe three....then quit and do more later. I always wanted to let her leave a session excited and wanting more.
    Sharon Potter

    www.redbranchkennels.net

    Chesapeake Bay Retrievers...too many to list.

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