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Thread: sit at a distance

  1. #71
    Senior Member Marissa E.'s Avatar
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    Yes. It is for all breeds. Just look it up on AKC.org.

    Marissa Everett

    Hebrews 12:11 No discipline seems pleasant at the time, but painful. Later on, however, it produces a harvest of righteousness and peace for those who have been trained by it.

  2. #72
    Senior Member Cass's Avatar
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    You can compete in obedience with any breed

  3. #73
    Member jaserelijah's Avatar
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    I saw the obedience for all breeds on the akc website. I guess a better question is what do those of you who compete in field trials and hunt test consider to be obedience. I know heel stay sit and down is there anything that can be incorporated now that will be helpful later. Having never seen a field trial or a hunt test I don't know how they work or what is needed obedience wise
    proverbs 12:10

  4. #74
    Senior Member Colonel Blimp's Avatar
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    Competitive obedience is terrific fun. Hunting dogs can compete with great benefits for them and the handlers. In "Training The Sporting Dog" each stage including the obedience tasks has a self-check list that you would find helpful (and challenging!). Another very salutary thing to do is set up a video camera and record yourself and Takoda together going through your paces. Many inexpensive cameras have a movie function thats good enough for the job. I guarantee you'll cringe at the first few run throughs.

    The obedience tasks for hunting dogs are "sit" (which means sit and stay), "heel" and "recall"; they are the basic building blocks of all training. They have to be in place not only so that we can physically direct and control the dog, but also make the dog concentrate on the handler. Some of the other things we want our dogs to do "obediently" are related to handling and casting, delivery to hand, and lining. Because casting at distance is remote from the handler our degree of control erodes, so we need to build up in baby steps getting a high compliance rate at each stage. Lining and delivery position are easy to deal with because the dog is close to us. All the obedience tasks and commands given in the field need to be cued by voice, whistle, and hand / arm signal.

    There are a number of tasks specific to different hunting situations or styles that we have to teach and then reinforce get a reliable performance. Getting in and out of boats and vehicles, crossing obstacles (or getting under or through them) sitting to shot and flush, and honouring are typical for retrievers; Spaniels and pointer / setters have an extra suite. Individual handlers will also have their own specific ideas and requirements. Ferinstance I teach mine to jump up on to their hound benches so I can more easily inspect them for burrs, cuts and stuff after a day afield; "leave it" when I have a number of dead birds by me; and "sit" with a quiet verbal hiss.

    Just by way of encouragement have a look at (and learn from) this clip of a retriever in the intermediate stage of heel work. All positive reinforced with a slip lead as insurance. Note first the dog focussing on the handler, and the handlers own body language and variation of pace and direction. That field has a good bit of rabbit scent on it so there is a bit of distraction, but the next stage is to move to different spots including an enclosed area with rabbits and domestic fowl running about.



    Eug
    Last edited by Colonel Blimp; 01-11-2014 at 06:58 AM.
    Thank you, very kind, Mine's a pint.

  5. #75
    Member jaserelijah's Avatar
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    Thanks Eug again you are more than helpful. I worked Takoda on heel and remote sit yesterday and used the slip lead. Today he has a cough. I didn't jerk him but he bolted once and hit the end of the lead pretty hard. It didn't seem to bother him then. This is the second time he has had a cough following a hard pull at the end of the lead. The first time he got tangled and pulled hard while on a tie out wearing his normal everyday collar. Have any of you had experience with this? When I looked it up it sounded like tracheal collapse If that's the case I would imagine a slip lead isn't correct for him. Thanks again
    proverbs 12:10

  6. #76
    Senior Member Colonel Blimp's Avatar
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    I don't use a slip lead in the way you do.

    I have it stopped up behind the ears, but don't use it as a resraint. Look at the first few seconds of the video to see how it should be held in your hands, ready to give a smart sideways tap as a correction. The correction is to tell the dog he's in the wrong position and must get back into it, not to pull him back. Simply pulling the dog around won't teach him anything very much.

    Tieing a dog out I regard as poor practise. It teaches nothing to the dog and asks nothing of him.

    Eug
    Thank you, very kind, Mine's a pint.

  7. #77
    Member jaserelijah's Avatar
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    I agree about tying out mine was tied when we were staying overnight and the hotel would not allow dogs inside he took off after something but the lead caught under the tire of the truck. yesterday I had the lead high above the level of the everyday collar he broke to play with my daughters beagle and both him and I received a jolt. this being the second time he is coughing I am thinking it is associated with the jolt. on a lighter note Is that your dog in the video? I notice your location is wales I believe my family originated there on my fathers side
    proverbs 12:10

  8. #78
    Senior Member Breck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaserelijah View Post
    I agree about tying out mine was tied when we were staying overnight and the hotel would not allow dogs inside he took off after something but the lead caught under the tire of the truck. yesterday I had the lead high above the level of the everyday collar he broke to play with my daughters beagle and both him and I received a jolt. this being the second time he is coughing I am thinking it is associated with the jolt. on a lighter note Is that your dog in the video? I notice your location is wales I believe my family originated there on my fathers side
    .
    with every post you make the more irritated I get.
    3 questions.
    You actually tied your dog onto your vehicle to stay outside over night at a hotel?
    Have you graduated high school?
    How many broke refigerators are on your front porch?
    "Darla" AFC Candlewoods Lil Smokin Tequila (2002-2013)(fondly remembered)
    "Smoke" Smokin Auggies Menace, QAA (2003- )(retired nut case, ask Rando)
    "Simba" Humewood Simba (1999-2014)(my 1st dog)

    .
    Per favore, non mi rompere i coglioni.
    Grazie




  9. #79
    Senior Member Wayne Nutt's Avatar
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    Breck, Read Proverbs 12:10.
    Wayne Nutt
    Go Nutts with dog training

    HRCH Patton's Parker Co. Shadow "Shadow"
    HRCH Clineline Hijacker "Jack"
    HRCH Marks a Lot Midnight Hudson, SH "Hudson"-retired
    Castile Creek's Rawhide, SH "Rowdy"

  10. #80
    Senior Member Ken Bora's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Breck View Post
    .
    with every post you make the more irritated I get.
    3 questions.
    You actually tied your dog onto your vehicle to stay outside over night at a hotel??........
    we may be being trolled here
    I feel there is now way a person who does not want to use an e-collar,
    and is "positive" is going to tie a dog to a truck outside overnight in a hotel lot.
    seems to know all the right buttons to push here.
    sorry if I am wrong, but this all just reads wrong.
    somebody is having fun with us all.
    "So what is big is not always the Trout nor the Deer but the chance, the being there. And what is full is not necessarily the creel nor the freezer, but the memory." ~ Aldo Leopold

    "The Greatest Obstacle to Discovery is not Ignorance -- It is the Illusion of Knowledge" ~ Daniel Boorstin

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