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Thread: Robert Gates "The Quiet Fury"

  1. #1
    Senior Member road kill's Avatar
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    Default Robert Gates "The Quiet Fury"

    How long before the "progressives" attack and destroy this mans character?

    As he has exposed what we already know, but the fraternity refuses to discuss!



    "All too often during my 4 years as secretary of defense, when I found myself sitting yet again at that witness table at yet another congressional hearing, I was tempted to stand up, slam the briefing book shut and quit on the spot. The exit lines were on the tip of my tongue: I may be the secretary of defense, but I am also an American citizen, and there is no son of a bitch in the world who can talk to me like that. I quit. Find somebody else. It was, I am confident, a fantasy widely shared throughout the executive branch."
    In my dreams and prayers, I had hoped a true American would stand up and speak out!

    Finally................

    http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/...06851526222552

    (or maybe he just made it all up?????)
    Last edited by road kill; 01-08-2014 at 09:12 AM.

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    Senior Member BonMallari's Avatar
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    I liked him when he was the president of Texas A&M, thought he was a good choice for Sec of Defense by GWB..already ordered the book, cant wait to read it in its entirety
    All my Exes live in Texas

    Quote Originally Posted by lanse brown View Post
    A few things that I learned still ring true. "Lanse when you get a gift, say thank you and walk away. When you get a screwing walk away. You are going to get a lot more screwings than gifts"

  3. #3
    Senior Member Golddogs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by road kill View Post
    How long before the "progressives" attack and destroy this mans character? The right wing loons will take care of that.

    As he has exposed what we already know, but the fraternity refuses to discuss!



    In my dreams and prayers, I had hoped a true American would stand up and speak out!

    Finally................

    http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/...06851526222552

    (or maybe he just made it all up?????)
    Typical Road Kill, not reading the entire copy, just the parts in large print.

    Gates paints a very clear picture of what both his Presidents did during his time. (Funny how he respected Hilliary and you missed that part.)

    Gates shows the warts of both, and his own. Probably one of the more honest and objective writes in a very long time.





    Gates’ memoir details Obama’s shift on Afghanistan


    By Thom Shanker


    New York Times


    WASHINGTON — After ordering a troop increase in Afghanistan, President Barack Obama eventually lost faith in the strategy, his doubts fed by White House advisers who continually brought him negative news reports suggesting it was failing, according to his former defense secretary, Robert Gates.

    In a new memoir, Gates, a Republican holdover from the Bush administration who served for two years under Obama, praises the president as a rigorous thinker who frequently made decisions “opposed by his political advisers or that would be unpopular with his fellow Democrats.” But Gates says that by 2011, Obama began criticizing — sometimes emotionally — the way his strategy in Afghanistan was playing out.

    At a pivotal meeting in the situation room in March 2011, called to discuss the withdrawal timetable, Obama opened with a blast of frustration — expressing doubts about Gen. David Petraeus, the commander hehad chosen, and questioning whether he could do business with the Afghan president, Hamid Karzai.

    “As I sat there, I thought: The president doesn’t trust his commander, can’t stand Karzai, doesn’t believe in his own strategy and doesn’t consider the war to be his,” Gates writes. “For him, it’s all about getting out.”

    “Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary at War” is the first book describing the Obama admin-istration’s policy deliberations written from inside the Cabinet. Gates offers 600 pages of detailed history of his personal wars with Congress, the Pentagon bureaucracy and, in particular, Obama’s White House staff. He wrote that the “controlling nature” of the staff “took micromanagement and operational meddling to a new level.”

    Obama’s decision to retain Gates at the Pentagon gave his national security team a respected professional and veteran of decades at the center of American foreign policy — and offered a bipartisan aura. But it was not long before Obama’s inner circle tired of the defense secretary they initially praised as “Yoda” — a reference to the wise, aged Jedi master in the “Star Wars” films — and he of them.

    Gates describes his running policy battles within Obama’s inner circle, among them Vice President Joe Biden; Tom Donilon, who served as national security adviser; and Douglas Lute, the Army lieutenant general who managed Afghan policy issues at the time.

    Gates calls Biden “a man of integrity,” but he questions his judgment. “I think he has been wrong on nearly every major foreign policy and national security issue over the past four decades,” Gates writes. He has high praise for Hillary Rodham Clinton, who served as secretary of state when he was at the Pentagon and was a frequent ally on national security issues.

    But Gates does say that, in defending her support for the Afghan surge, she confided that her opposition to Bush’s Iraq surge when she was in the Senate and a presidential candidate “had been political,” since she was facing Obama, then an anti-war senator, in the Iowa primary. In the same conversation, Obama “conceded vaguely that opposition to the Iraq surge had been political,” Gates recalls. “To hear the two of them making these admissions, and in front of me, was as surprising as it was dismaying.”

    Gates discloses that he almost quit in September 2009 after a dispute-filled meeting to assess the way ahead in Afghanistan, including the number of troops that were needed. “I was deeply uneasy with the Obama White House’s lack of appreciation — from the top down — of the uncertainties and unpredictability of war,” he recalls. “I came closer to resigning that day than at any other time in my tenure.”

    Caitlin Hayden, the National Security Council spokeswoman, released a statement late Tuesday saying that “deliberations over our policy on Afghanistan have been widely reported on over the years, and it is well known that the president has been committed to achieving the mission of disrupting, dismantling and defeating al-Qaida, while also ensuring that we have a clear plan for winding down the war, which will end this year.”

    In response to Gates’ comments on Biden, she said, “President Obama relies on his good counsel every day.”

    Gates is a bipartisan critic of the two presidents he served as defense secretary. He holds the George W. Bush administration responsible for misguided policy that squandered the early victories in Afghanistan and Iraq, although he credits Bush with ordering a troop surge in Iraq that contributed to averting collapse of the mission.

    And he says that only he and Bush’s second secretary of state, Condoleezza Rice, pressed forcefully to close the detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, with little result.

    Stinging assessments were aimed at Capitol Hill. In private, members of Congress could be calm, thoughtful and insightful, he says.

    “But when they went into an open hearing, and the little red light went on atop a television camera, it had the effect of a full moon on a werewolf,” he adds.

    Gates does not spare himself from criticism. He describes how he came to feel “an overwhelming sense of personal responsibility” for the troops he ordered into combat, which left him misty-eyed when discussing their sacrifices — and perhaps clouded his judgment when coldhearted national security interests were at stake.

    Gates acknowledges that he initially opposed sending special operations forces to attack a housing compound in Pakistan where Osama bin Laden was believed to be hiding. Gates writes that Obama’s approval for the Navy SEAL mission, despite strong doubts that bin Laden was even there, was “one of the most courageous decisions I had ever witnessed in the White House.”

    In his final chapter, Gates makes clear his verdict on the president’s overall Afghan strategy: “I believe Obama was right in each of these decisions.”

    Gates reveals the depth of Obama’s concerns over leaks of classified information to news outlets, noting that within his first month in office, the new president said he wanted a criminal investigation into disclosures by the New York Times on covert action intended to sabotage Iran’s suspected effort to develop nuclear weapons.

    Gates, too, ordered a campaign to stamp out unauthorized disclosures, but grew rankled when White House officials always blamed the Pentagon for leaks. “Only the president would acknowledge to me he had problems with leaks in his own shop,” Gates writes.
    Never trust a dog to watch your food!

  4. #4
    Senior Member road kill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Golddogs View Post
    Typical Road Kill, not reading the entire copy, just the parts in large print.

    Gates paints a very clear picture of what both his Presidents did during his time. (Funny how he respected Hilliary and you missed that part.)

    Gates shows the warts of both, and his own. Probably one of the more honest and objective writes in a very long time.





    Gates’ memoir details Obama’s shift on Afghanistan


    By Thom Shanker


    New York Times


    WASHINGTON — After ordering a troop increase in Afghanistan, President Barack Obama eventually lost faith in the strategy, his doubts fed by White House advisers who continually brought him negative news reports suggesting it was failing, according to his former defense secretary, Robert Gates.

    In a new memoir, Gates, a Republican holdover from the Bush administration who served for two years under Obama, praises the president as a rigorous thinker who frequently made decisions “opposed by his political advisers or that would be unpopular with his fellow Democrats.” But Gates says that by 2011, Obama began criticizing — sometimes emotionally — the way his strategy in Afghanistan was playing out.

    At a pivotal meeting in the situation room in March 2011, called to discuss the withdrawal timetable, Obama opened with a blast of frustration — expressing doubts about Gen. David Petraeus, the commander hehad chosen, and questioning whether he could do business with the Afghan president, Hamid Karzai.

    “As I sat there, I thought: The president doesn’t trust his commander, can’t stand Karzai, doesn’t believe in his own strategy and doesn’t consider the war to be his,” Gates writes. “For him, it’s all about getting out.”

    “Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary at War” is the first book describing the Obama admin-istration’s policy deliberations written from inside the Cabinet. Gates offers 600 pages of detailed history of his personal wars with Congress, the Pentagon bureaucracy and, in particular, Obama’s White House staff. He wrote that the “controlling nature” of the staff “took micromanagement and operational meddling to a new level.”

    Obama’s decision to retain Gates at the Pentagon gave his national security team a respected professional and veteran of decades at the center of American foreign policy — and offered a bipartisan aura. But it was not long before Obama’s inner circle tired of the defense secretary they initially praised as “Yoda” — a reference to the wise, aged Jedi master in the “Star Wars” films — and he of them.

    Gates describes his running policy battles within Obama’s inner circle, among them Vice President Joe Biden; Tom Donilon, who served as national security adviser; and Douglas Lute, the Army lieutenant general who managed Afghan policy issues at the time.

    Gates calls Biden “a man of integrity,” but he questions his judgment. “I think he has been wrong on nearly every major foreign policy and national security issue over the past four decades,” Gates writes. He has high praise for Hillary Rodham Clinton, who served as secretary of state when he was at the Pentagon and was a frequent ally on national security issues.

    But Gates does say that, in defending her support for the Afghan surge, she confided that her opposition to Bush’s Iraq surge when she was in the Senate and a presidential candidate “had been political,” since she was facing Obama, then an anti-war senator, in the Iowa primary. In the same conversation, Obama “conceded vaguely that opposition to the Iraq surge had been political,” Gates recalls. “To hear the two of them making these admissions, and in front of me, was as surprising as it was dismaying.” Reads like a glowing endorsement to me........Gates discloses that he almost quit in September 2009 after a dispute-filled meeting to assess the way ahead in Afghanistan, including the number of troops that were needed. “I was deeply uneasy with the Obama White House’s lack of appreciation — from the top down — of the uncertainties and unpredictability of war,” he recalls. “I came closer to resigning that day than at any other time in my tenure.”

    Caitlin Hayden, the National Security Council spokeswoman, released a statement late Tuesday saying that “deliberations over our policy on Afghanistan have been widely reported on over the years, and it is well known that the president has been committed to achieving the mission of disrupting, dismantling and defeating al-Qaida, while also ensuring that we have a clear plan for winding down the war, which will end this year.”

    In response to Gates’ comments on Biden, she said, “President Obama relies on his good counsel every day.”

    Gates is a bipartisan critic of the two presidents he served as defense secretary. He holds the George W. Bush administration responsible for misguided policy that squandered the early victories in Afghanistan and Iraq, although he credits Bush with ordering a troop surge in Iraq that contributed to averting collapse of the mission.

    And he says that only he and Bush’s second secretary of state, Condoleezza Rice, pressed forcefully to close the detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, with little result.

    Stinging assessments were aimed at Capitol Hill. In private, members of Congress could be calm, thoughtful and insightful, he says.

    “But when they went into an open hearing, and the little red light went on atop a television camera, it had the effect of a full moon on a werewolf,” he adds.

    Gates does not spare himself from criticism. He describes how he came to feel “an overwhelming sense of personal responsibility” for the troops he ordered into combat, which left him misty-eyed when discussing their sacrifices — and perhaps clouded his judgment when coldhearted national security interests were at stake.

    Gates acknowledges that he initially opposed sending special operations forces to attack a housing compound in Pakistan where Osama bin Laden was believed to be hiding. Gates writes that Obama’s approval for the Navy SEAL mission, despite strong doubts that bin Laden was even there, was “one of the most courageous decisions I had ever witnessed in the White House.”

    In his final chapter, Gates makes clear his verdict on the president’s overall Afghan strategy: “I believe Obama was right in each of these decisions.”

    Gates reveals the depth of Obama’s concerns over leaks of classified information to news outlets, noting that within his first month in office, the new president said he wanted a criminal investigation into disclosures by the New York Times on covert action intended to sabotage Iran’s suspected effort to develop nuclear weapons.

    Gates, too, ordered a campaign to stamp out unauthorized disclosures, but grew rankled when White House officials always blamed the Pentagon for leaks. “Only the president would acknowledge to me he had problems with leaks in his own shop,” Gates writes.
    Yep, I didn't read the whole thing, and you KNOW this for a fact.............TYPICAL!

  5. #5
    Senior Member Golddogs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by road kill View Post
    Yep, I didn't read the whole thing, and you KNOW this for a fact.............TYPICAL!
    Stan you just confirmed it. By highlightiing only the cherry picked passages, you show your bias. When read in it's total, it is a balanced view of his tenure, showing the good and bad of both the administrations he served.
    Never trust a dog to watch your food!

  6. #6
    Senior Member road kill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Golddogs View Post
    Stan you just confirmed it. By highlightiing only the cherry picked passages, you show your bias. When read in it's total, it is a balanced view of his tenure, showing the good and bad of both the administrations he served.
    Your bias is your refusal to see the ineptitude at the highest level.
    (like YOU didn't cherry pick)
    No where in the article does it mention anything about President Bush using the war and the soldiers lives as political tools.
    But Clinton and President Obama admited it, in front of him.
    You can't spin that.
    I read the article, this is my take.
    Frankly I am surprised that a progressive has responded, as the marching orders have yet to be issued!!!!
    Last edited by road kill; 01-08-2014 at 12:12 PM.

  7. #7
    Senior Member GaryJ's Avatar
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    The Washington Post and other news organizations were given advanced copies of the book. They chose to print an excerpt and I am assuming had permission to do so.

    While the excerpt may show some balance this is really the first time any high ranking official with what both sides of the aisle refer to has having integrity has spoken out different than the party line. If what he says in his book is not true then why would the Pres and his minions be so worried about?

    I too am glad someone is finally providing a balanced picture rather than the one the administration paints. No one is perfect but the current administration is so full of itself it would like everyone to believe it can do no wrong. Maybe the house of cards is starting to crumble.
    Hebrews 11:3 By faith we understand that the worlds were framed by the word of God, so that the things which are seen were not made of things which are visible.

    What if all we have today is what we gave thanks for yesterday?

    Let the views of others educate and inform you, but let your decisions be a product of your own conclusions. (Jim Rohn)

  8. #8
    Senior Member road kill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GaryJ View Post
    The Washington Post and other news organizations were given advanced copies of the book. They chose to print an excerpt and I am assuming had permission to do so.

    While the excerpt may show some balance this is really the first time any high ranking official with what both sides of the aisle refer to has having integrity has spoken out different than the party line. If what he says in his book is not true then why would the Pres and his minions be so worried about?

    I too am glad someone is finally providing a balanced picture rather than the one the administration paints. No one is perfect but the current administration is so full of itself it would like everyone to believe it can do no wrong. Maybe the house of cards is starting to crumble.
    And some do.............

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    Quote Originally Posted by road kill View Post
    How long before the "progressives" attack and destroy this mans character?

    As he has exposed what we already know, but the fraternity refuses to discuss!



    In my dreams and prayers, I had hoped a true American would stand up and speak out!

    Finally................

    http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/...06851526222552

    (or maybe he just made it all up?????)
    I like Gates. He doesn't mind speaking his mind. He doesn't care that the sword can cut both ways. That's rare in our Partisan world
    So I'm curious as to your reaction when this "man of your dreams and true American hero," replied that GWB's "War on Terror" had not only ruined our economy, and lowered our status in most of our Allies eyes, but had also made us LESS SAFE from terror?

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    From the above linked WSJ Gates article:

    Wars are a lot easier to get into than out of. Those who ask about exit strategies or question what will happen if assumptions prove wrong are rarely welcome at the conference table when the fire-breathers are demanding that we strike—as they did when advocating invading Iraq, intervening in Libya and Syria, or bombing Iran's nuclear sites. But in recent decades, presidents confronted with tough problems abroad have too often been too quick to reach for a gun. Our foreign and national security policy has become too militarized, the use of force too easy for presidents.
    Today, too many ideologues call for U.S. force as the first option rather than a last resort. On the left, we hear about the "responsibility to protect" civilians to justify military intervention in Libya, Syria, Sudan and elsewhere. On the right, the failure to strike Syria or Iran is deemed an abdication of U.S. leadership. And so the rest of the world sees the U.S. as a militaristic country quick to launch planes, cruise missiles and drones deep into sovereign countries or ungoverned spaces. There are limits to what even the strongest and greatest nation on Earth can do—and not every outrage, act of aggression, oppression or crisis should elicit a U.S. military response.

    Thank you for drawing our attention to someone Libertarians and "progressives" might also admire.
    power without lumber, raciness without weediness

    A big man never looks down on others.... instead, he is someone to look up to.

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