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Thread: Rowdy (by Pirate) Blind under Poison Bird arc and 290 Mark

  1. #1
    Senior Member Wayne Nutt's Avatar
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    Default Rowdy (by Pirate) Blind under Poison Bird arc and 290 Mark

    This is Rowdy's third lesson with blinds and poison birds. The first was about 11/7/13 with Bumper Boys. Second was on 12/31/13 with ducks. So I am following Lardys's and taking it slow with a couple weeks between sessions. The first whistle was probably not necessary but I had him lined up a bit too much to the right and I didn't want him to back side the gun station. This is a known blind that we have run before.
    Following the Lardy technique to say "mark" before he retrieves poison bird and to let him know its now ok to retrieve it. But I messed up and said it after I had my hand down. Notice the head fake but he knew it was not his name. Good job Rowdy. Bad job Wayne.

    There was a strong cross wind right to left. Blind is 150 yds, gun station is 60 yds.

    http://s868.photobucket.com/user/way...1638e.mp4.html


    This is a 290 yd mark. It is run up hill. There are several small levees in route and the mark is on top of a flat mesa kind of area. Notice there are two pops. I got this tip from Kim. See indicated that it helps because the launch from the winger is so quick after the pop. So I put two wingers out. The first one has just a popper. The second pop is when the duck is launched. It is a mallard hen that has been breasted and duct taped back together. I tried to hold it up so it could be seen but the back lighting was not good.

    I tried to watch Rowdy and take a quick peek up but messed that up as I looked up on the first shot. Rowdy ran a little wide but hooked back into the bird. There was a strong tail wind.

    http://s868.photobucket.com/user/way...fe003.mp4.html

    With all the cold weather I had to buy a new handlers parka that would fit over my warm clothing. It is a snow goose camo parka from Cabela's.

    Any constructive comments are welcome.
    Last edited by Wayne Nutt; 01-13-2014 at 03:02 PM.
    Wayne Nutt
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    Why did you have the dog switch sides?

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    Senior Member Lucky Number Seven's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul "Happy" Gilmore View Post
    Why did you have the dog switch sides?

    That seems to be a crutch to keep his focus away from the mark. I have not seen that done before. But please explain if it is something that you seen somewhere.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Wayne Nutt's Avatar
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    Paul and Seven, Switching sides is just part of the Lardy process that I briefly outlined in my OP:
    http://www.retrievertraining.net/for...29+poison+bird

    In Lardy's article Guidelines for Poison Birds he says,"Use consistent cues to identify the poison bird situation. Before I signal for the poison bird to be thrown, I always firmly say, "No Bird". Then after the poison bird is thrown, I say "No... dead bird". I then have the dog back up from the heeling position to reestablish a new position to be sent for the poison bird. With two-sided dogs, I may even have them switch the side they are heeling on as I direct them to sit down for the blind retrieve. Though this may mean nothing to your dog the first few times you do this, he will eventually understand the routine."

    So in my opinion it is just establishing a routine and becomes another "cue".

    I think there is a typo in the fourth sentence I quoted. Maybe someone with the newer RJ articles Vol 1 can see if it has changed.

    Hope this helps.
    Wayne Nutt
    Go Nutts with dog training

    HRCH Patton's Parker Co. Shadow "Shadow"
    HRCH Clineline Hijacker "Jack"
    HRCH Marks a Lot Midnight Hudson, SH "Hudson"-retired
    Castile Creek's Rawhide, SH "Rowdy"

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    Senior Member Chris Videtto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne Nutt View Post
    Paul and Seven, Switching sides is just part of the Lardy process that I briefly outlined in my OP:
    http://www.retrievertraining.net/for...29+poison+bird

    In Lardy's article Guidelines for Poison Birds he says,"Use consistent cues to identify the poison bird situation. Before I signal for the poison bird to be thrown, I always firmly say, "No Bird". Then after the poison bird is thrown, I say "No... dead bird". I then have the dog back up from the heeling position to reestablish a new position to be sent for the poison bird. With two-sided dogs, I may even have them switch the side they are heeling on as I direct them to sit down for the blind retrieve. Though this may mean nothing to your dog the first few times you do this, he will eventually understand the routine."

    So in my opinion it is just establishing a routine and becomes another "cue".

    I think there is a typo in the fourth sentence I quoted. Maybe someone with the newer RJ articles Vol 1 can see if it has changed.

    Hope this helps.
    Wayne, I agree and go through the same routine, providing the dog is two sided...obviously! Nice job you and Rowdy, doing a very nice job with him! Thanks for posting, as always!!!!

    Chris
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    Senior Member labsforme's Avatar
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    I am one sided and do que the dog with "leave it".Some dogs interpret "no" meaning never get the bird. Sometimes they have to pick it up as a mark after the blind and keeps from them having problems with that.Wayne appreciate the videos.

    Jeff
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    Senior Member DoubleHaul's Avatar
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    I switch sides on PB blinds as well. Just another cue, like putting the hand down or not for sending or "easy" or whatever.

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    I can understand the reasoning for the cue although, when first teaching the dogs leave it birds I might worry it would put too much emphasis long term that you must reposition the dog via the cue prior to running past a poison bird during the teaching phases. You won't always nor, want to reposition the dog prior to running a blind past a leave it bird?

  9. #9
    Senior Member DoubleHaul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul "Happy" Gilmore View Post
    You won't always nor, want to reposition the dog prior to running a blind past a leave it bird?
    No, of course you are right. I probably always do it in training and almost always at a trial, but I might not. Sort of like putting the dog in the side to which the last bird down is thrown or picking them up with secondary selection. That is how we roll, until we don't roll that way. I try to think about where I want the dog for the PB blind and set it on the opposite side for the mark.

    A lot depends on the dog, as well. I have one that doesn't do well with lots of lining before sending on a blind anyway. He is sort of a worrier so I don't try to get him perfect as it is usually better to get him good enough and live with the result than tinker too much. Depending on what is going on, I may leave him or just point him at the PB thrower and move him away to the blind.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul "Happy" Gilmore View Post
    Why did you have the dog switch sides?
    To me that seems to be a very helpful "CUE" that is very helpful when used as a routine that the dog is familiar with

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