The RetrieverTraining.Net Forums The Retriever Academy
Total Retriever Training with Mike Lardy
Hawkeye Media Gunners Up Tritronics Outdoor Media
Page 1 of 11 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 108

Thread: Getting started in field trials

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    332

    Default Getting started in field trials

    So a couple of the other threads on here got me thinking...just how does one get started running field trials?? I'm sure there are probably a few others that may be wondering the same thing, so why not put together a list of things a newbie needs to know before showing up at their first trial. Personally I know very little about them, so maybe some of the experienced folks can post some tips/information resources, etc. Try to keep it serious and provide legitimate information for anybody who wants to know. Personally I've went and watched 2 separate trials, one being the Canadian national amateur last year, and that day I think I was easily the youngest person there (33) I could be wrong but it seems to me it could very well be a dying sport. So how about it folks how about a little FYI/FAQ for Newbie Field Trialers.

    For a starting point, let's say we already have:
    * field trial quality pup
    * a copy of one of the training programs (Lardy/Graham/etc)

    Personally my biggest question would be:
    * what should the dog be capable of handling? (Training requirements?)

  2. #2
    Senior Member Mary Lynn Metras's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Watford, ONT
    Posts
    3,295

    Default

    A good dog (black ) able to be trained is key!! Along with what you mentioned. I believe another thread talked about dog's pedigrees which is important in selecting a dog. IMO A place to train and join a club to support the sport. Your own training equipment (throwers, BB etc) if you will be training alone at times. IMO Good luck to you!!!
    HRCH Scaupgetters Tarnation QAA
    HR Blackie 2 CGN, WCI
    Metras's Hashtag Mickey


    "Knowing how important right timing is in accomplishing right actions"
    Uncle Ray

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    1,073

    Default

    You will think this is not serious but it is.

    1) Get a checking account with a lot of money in it that you don't need or want.

    2) Get a thick skin.

    3) Be prepared mentally to never have a winner.

    4) Find a good pro and send the best dog you have to him/her and just wait.

    It is a tough game and not for the impatient or faint of heart. The top 1/10 of the top 1% of talented dogs in the country are successful. Al the rest never see a blue ribbon.

    Others may see it different, bit that is my take.

    MP
    The pain of regret is much worse than the pain of hard work.

  4. #4
    Member TRUEBLUE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Denver,IA
    Posts
    33

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Perry View Post

    It is a tough game and not for the impatient or faint of heart. The top 1/10 of the top 1% of talented dogs in the country are successful. Al the rest never see a blue ribbon.

    Others may see it different, bit that is my take.

    MP
    Pretty accurate statement, Mike.
    Last edited by TRUEBLUE; 01-11-2014 at 08:30 AM. Reason: Change
    FC-AFC Pinehurst's All That Jazz
    FC Pinehurst's True Blue

  5. #5
    Senior Member BonMallari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    LV/CenTex/Idaho
    Posts
    12,448

    Default

    1. access to a variety of training grounds

    2. supportive spouse

    3. flexible job or self employed

    4. competitive spirit

    5. mentor with previous success in field trials
    All my Exes live in Texas

    Quote Originally Posted by lanse brown View Post
    A few things that I learned still ring true. "Lanse when you get a gift, say thank you and walk away. When you get a screwing walk away. You are going to get a lot more screwings than gifts"

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Wyebridge, Can
    Posts
    237

    Default

    Or you could do what we did get up the nerve to send in an entry. You never know what will happen and the game is looking for people to get involved here in Canada. You are right our ages are getting up there. You will have to make so choices as training a dog takes a great deal of time and/or money if you go the pro route.

  7. #7
    Junior Member Greg Heier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    27

    Default

    Step One: Get a good dog
    Step Two: Train until you think your dog is ready for the level you will be entering than double that amount of training before you actually enter.
    Step Three: Pay your money and take your chances
    Step Four: Learn through competition that there are better dogs with better training
    Step Five: Humbled, go back to Step Two and repeat until you either start having success or realize that you really need to go back to Step One and start a different dog
    Step Six: Repeat for a lifetime

    Greg

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    New Haven, CT
    Posts
    1,192

    Default

    Pay your entry fee and start running. It's between you and the dog. It's not what other people think it's what you think about the trial you ran. Win or lose just love being at the line with your dog that you trained and handled and running the setup.
    Gentle in what you do. Firm in how you do it.

    CH SILVERCREEK MURRAY SAMUEL (MURRAY) WDQ CGC MH *** 2/16/00 - 12/26/12
    WESTWIND WHISPERING COVE (LARRY son of Murray) WDQ MH ***
    LPK DELAWARE RIVER WHISPERING COVE **(SAVAGE SAM son of FC Chester MH)
    WESTWIND WHISPERING COVE JAY ** ( Larry's son and Murray's grandson)

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    1,024

    Default

    You coulda said the same thing about the sport dying out 30 years ago about field trialing. Back then mostly the more "mature" folks were the ones who were running dogs. It helps to have retired with some savings.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Faunsdale, Ala
    Posts
    455

    Default

    The Op has a fair question however lots of answers are available.
    If you like outdoors, training a dog(s) , being committed, have available grounds, time , etc , have disposable funds, like to travel, be disappointed a lot, realize that a lottery ticket has about as much chance as all of us do( there is a group that has good success however they are mostly very experienced) then the retriever sport will enrich your life.

    While it is about winning or achieving a standard the really successful folks enjoy a special relationship with their dog. If you go out in the first series or pickup in the 4th or perhaps finish; it is really about the team and are YOU happy with the work.

    Enjoy the journey and you may find the destination changed.
    Dk

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •