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Thread: Getting started in field trials

  1. #71
    Senior Member Ted Shih's Avatar
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    I don't think that the fact that a person trains his/her own dogs necessarily means that person will be a good judge.
    I don't think that the fact that a person competes with his/her own dogs necessarily means that a person will be a good judge.
    I don't think that the fact that a stake may be judged by people with the minimum number of points needed means that the stake will be poor.
    I don't think that the fact that a stake may be judged by people with considerably more than the minimum number of points needed means that the stake will be good.
    But, the odds are sure stacked that way.

    Competition does not build character - It reveals it.

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  2. #72
    Senior Member Ted Shih's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Robinson View Post
    I just read the last two post, certainly attending a judging seminar is good for anybody.
    Hard to imagine that being exposed to different ideas could be bad for you.
    Competition does not build character - It reveals it.

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  3. #73
    Senior Member huntinman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newf View Post
    So a couple of the other threads on here got me thinking...just how does one get started running field trials?? I'm sure there are probably a few others that may be wondering the same thing, so why not put together a list of things a newbie needs to know before showing up at their first trial. Personally I know very little about them, so maybe some of the experienced folks can post some tips/information resources, etc. Try to keep it serious and provide legitimate information for anybody who wants to know. Personally I've went and watched 2 separate trials, one being the Canadian national amateur last year, and that day I think I was easily the youngest person there (33) I could be wrong but it seems to me it could very well be a dying sport. So how about it folks how about a little FYI/FAQ for Newbie Field Trialers.

    For a starting point, let's say we already have:
    * field trial quality pup
    * a copy of one of the training programs (Lardy/Graham/etc)

    Personally my biggest question would be:
    * what should the dog be capable of handling? (Training requirements?)




    This was the OP

    And you wonder why newbies say the hell with it??
    Bill Davis

  4. #74
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    Kind of seems like the person who likes to be the underdog, learn the hard way and defy the odds is the perfect fit for Field Trials regardless if they are successful or not!
    Erik B.

  5. #75
    Senior Member DoubleHaul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newf View Post
    Great info so far folks...I might get picked on for this one, but here goes anyway...

    What about the actual requirements for a Field trial? Where would a person find that info? I know when I was training my dog for hunt tests I had an actual list of requirements for each level. Ie SH= double marks @ 100, blind @ 100,walk ups, etc. Is there a similar set of elements a judge has to follow to create a fair trial? Or a similar yardstick to measure an individuals training so that can at least "think" they are ready to enter a trial?
    In that regard, the FT rules are less helpful than the HT rules, since it isn't going against a standard, there isn't a standard. The judges toss out what they think is a good test to find the best dogs. You mentioned in your first post that you had Lardy or Graham's training materials. Look at the flow chart. Pretty much all of the Advanced stuff mentioned and more.

    You really have to see to appreciate what a 100 dog open looks like

  6. #76
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    Have Santa drop off several sacks full of money.

    Pray that you get the dog.

    Hope for no injuries.

    Find the perfect trainer for said dog.

    Ask Santa to deliver more sacks of money.

    Forget you ever had said money & pray that he/she doesn't crash & burn in The FT.

  7. #77
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    Newf, went back to your original post. You say you attended the National Amateur so I take it you are in the western zone I also think you posted somewhere that you have run hunt test. If you live close to where the Am National was run why don't you contact that club and talk to them about coming to a training day. You can probably find information about clubs in your area on the National website. Your dog is going to need to handle all the things it handles in a hunt test at much greater distances. You saw the marks and blinds at the National, they are much like the marks and blinds you would find at a weekend field trail, the judging is just tighter. You can get a copy of the Field Trial rules from the Canadian Kennel Club.

  8. #78
    Senior Member Hunt'EmUp's Avatar
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    My take Judging is about giving back, not about what one can take from it; it's not about what you can learn by judging. Sorry but it sort've gets to me when people suggest judging as a way to learn about dogs, or learn to be a better handler. A judge should already have a vast amount of knowledge, and already know how to run and read dogs. A judge should have a bunch of dog experience, and a pretty good idea of factors, landscape, how to setup marks, influences etc. They should have already been there and trained a dog in the division which they are judging. I don't particularly like the idea of judges learning these lessons, nor deciding to judge with the intention of learning (that can be done from the gallery, or in the marshals chair, or in a gun station). I want a judge who has already been there, already knows, and chooses to give back; otherwise how can I respect their evaluation of mine or any dogs.
    Last edited by Hunt'EmUp; 01-13-2014 at 08:58 PM.
    "They's Just DAWGS"
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  9. #79
    Senior Member DarrinGreene's Avatar
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    No one said that JUDGING was a good way to learn anything. It was said that PREPARING TO JUDGE was a way to learn.

    There's a big difference between med school and being a doctor. Judging is no different.
    Darrin Greene

  10. #80
    Senior Member Ted Shih's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunt'EmUp View Post
    My take Judging is about giving back, not about what one can take from it; it's not about what you can learn by judging. Sorry but it sort've gets to me when people suggest judging as a way to learn about dogs, or learn to be a better handler. A judge should already have a vast amount of knowledge, and already know how to run and read dogs. A judge should have a bunch of dog experience, and a pretty good idea of factors, landscape, how to setup marks, influences etc. They should have already been there and trained a dog in the division which they are judging. I don't particularly like the idea of judges learning these lessons, nor deciding to judge with the intention of learning (that can be done from the gallery, or in the marshals chair, or in a gun station). I want a judge who has already been there, already knows, and chooses to give back; otherwise how can I respect their evaluation of mine or any dogs.

    This is a great ideal. However, the harsh reality is that there are not enough of the people you describe for the judging openings that must be filled.
    Competition does not build character - It reveals it.

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