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Thread: Newbie- help finding right dog.

  1. #1
    Senior Member Migillicutty's Avatar
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    Default Newbie- help finding right dog.

    SIAP (sorry if already posted)- and it may have been answered. I have been searching and reading the forums but I am curious about how finding the right dog works in the dog world. I live in Aubrey Tx and trained reining horses professionally for several years. Competed at all our industries major events. I have seen the pitfalls of non-pros purchasing horses without the help of a competent professional. They then get attached to that horse who is not a good fit or does not have the ability to accomplish what they would like to be able to. They then have the difficult decision of being stuck with that horse or selling it. I think with dogs also being companion animals that decision would be even tougher. I get that at high levels selling and moving to the next prospect is probably common, but I would like to avoid that if possible. My wife has a hard time letting go of any animal. (Why we have three adopted dogs right now from her time volunteering at the dog rescue)

    That said I am interested in getting a nice dog in the near future. I am an avid duck hunter. I have a lab I "trained" myself in college but he is retired from the field (age and arthritis he is 13). I use trained loosely as he did hunt and retrieve but knew just the very basics. Several years back I hunted with a friend who ran hunt tests and was a pretty accomplished amateur trainer. I watched his dog make a 200+ yd blind on a hard swimming cripple with him handling her and it was like the first time I saw a great reining horse. I knew right then and there that is something I'd like to experience with a dog of my own.

    To the point, in the dog world do trainers help amateurs in finding and selecting a dog? Will they discuss the goals of the owner and then help them locate and identify a good started prospect like we do in the horse world for clients? I would think this would be the best way to have the best opportunity to find something that is a match and would be able to accomplish the goals of the owner. Thank you for reading and your patience if this comes off as totally naive.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Breck's Avatar
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    If you're serious I would simply have a chat with the vet in Lewisville and go from there.
    "Darla" AFC Candlewoods Lil Smokin Tequila (2002-2013)(fondly remembered)
    "Smoke" Smokin Auggies Menace, QAA (2003- )(retired nut case, ask Rando)
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  3. #3
    Senior Member Sharon Potter's Avatar
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    I too come from a strong horse background, having trained and shown professionally for many years before "going to the dogs".

    I can absolutely relate to the ammy who buys a totally inappropriate horse. There are plenty of people in the dog world who can help you find the right dog for you....but just as in horses, make sure your expectations are clear. Will you be training the dog or will you hire a pro? Some pros may lean toward a dog *they* like and that might not be the best fit for what you are wanting, if they will be doing the training and campaigning (just like horses). Do you plan to run hunt tests or field trials? Or are you simply looking for a really nice quality dog that you can train, hunt, and enjoy?

    It's not at all unlike reiners. Sometimes the ammy buys a little too much horse, and it spins right out from under them. The good thing about buying a started dog, just like buying a young horse with some saddle time, is that you can handle them and see how you get along. And just like in horses, with a puppy you never know what you've got until its grown up and has some training under its belt.
    Sharon Potter

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    Senior Member 2tall's Avatar
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    Hey, there are a lot of us ex-horseys out here! Sharon is exactly right about the similarities between choosing inappropriate horses and dogs. When I switched to dogs, should have known better. I got a Thoroughbred race horse when I would have been better off with a Shetland Pony! And if you are in fact close to the vet that Breck mentioned, I'm guessing Dr. Ed Aycock, a visit with him would be worth a great deal to you. Pros will help you out, especially if you plan on sending your pup to them for training. Better yet, since this still seems to a long range plan, join a retriever club, go to their events, meet their dogs and see what works for YOU. They will welcome you with open arms if you bring along a throwing arm.
    Carol,
    Owned and handled by Cruisin' with Indiana Jones, JH
    Alternate Handler: Westwind Buffalo Soldier
    Apprentice Handler: Snake River Medicine Man, JH
    http://newhoperetrievers.com

  5. #5
    Senior Member Migillicutty's Avatar
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    I wouldn't say I am an ex-horsey. I am still active in riding and plan on competing again when my waiting period is up for my nonpro status.

    I would like a gun dog to hunt with and also run hunt tests. This dog would also be a family dog. I am planning this out to hopefully avoid some mistakes and make good choices. Yes I plan on sending the dog to the trainer but want to be an active participant as time allows.

    i agree on the started dog. You should have a better idea of what you are getting. That is why I am leaning that way. In horses picking yearlings is all breeding, conformation, movement and if they have "that look", but you never really know how the mental aspect is going to work and their mind is what really makes the great ones. Lots of them have the athletic ability, it is their mind and trainability that separates them.

    The retriever club is a good idea. I will look in to that for sure.

    Do dog trainers do like horse trainers and match non pros with started dogs? If I find a trainer I want to work with will they help in locating an appropriate animal for a fee or commission? I have searched the forums for names of recommended trainers. It seems their are some pretty close to me that come highly recommended.

    Lastly who who is this Lewisville vet? Seems odd to just call a vet for advice on a finding a dog.

    thank you for your replies thus far.
    Last edited by Migillicutty; 01-12-2014 at 01:22 PM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Dave Farrar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Migillicutty View Post


    Lastly who who is this Lewisville vet? Seems odd to just call a vet for advice on a finding a dog.

    thank you for your replies thus far.
    This is a cut and paste from an old thread explaining who the vet is:
    Ed Aycock ran his 1st AKC licensed field trial March 1971
    He has judged more than 50 all-age stakes
    He competed in 13 Nationals
    Has competed with 7 different titled dogs, AFC I'd Rather Be Lucky, FC-AFC Honcho's Harvey Hipockets, FC-AFC Trumarc's Hot Pursuit, FC-AFC Trumarc's Ziparoo, AFC Candlewood's Ms Costalot, AFC Trumarc's Welterweight, FC-AFC Trumarc's Lean Cuisine
    Co-Chief Marshall 1988 National Open, Co-Chief Marshall 1991 National
    Amateur, Chairman National Open 1996, past President of the National
    Retriever Club, Advisor to National Retriever Club and National Amateur
    Retriever Club regarding AKC Canine Health Foundation, additional National jobs, 1984 National Retriever Championship Chairman of the Steward's Committee, 2004 National Retriever Championship Co-Captain of the Guns
    Chairman of the North Texas Retriever Club field trial October 1974 to April 2005
    DUCKDAWG'S MAC'S MAGICAL MR. OCTOBER JH -- Reggie

  7. #7
    Senior Member 2tall's Avatar
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    And oh yeah, he is an amateur.
    Carol,
    Owned and handled by Cruisin' with Indiana Jones, JH
    Alternate Handler: Westwind Buffalo Soldier
    Apprentice Handler: Snake River Medicine Man, JH
    http://newhoperetrievers.com

  8. #8
    Senior Member Dave Farrar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2tall View Post
    And oh yeah, he is an amateur.
    Maybe some day if he gets good enough, he can charge people...
    DUCKDAWG'S MAC'S MAGICAL MR. OCTOBER JH -- Reggie

  9. #9
    Senior Member Hunt'EmUp's Avatar
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    I think you'd be better off getting advice from amateurs who train their own dogs and have been successful, than just relying on a pro. As stated before pros usually have a very distinct type of dog they like, they also might have a monetary aspect involved, as in they "just had a litter", of pup that isn't what you really need or want. I'm not saying there are not good pros out there that would help ya, just that there a alot of pros out there and i only know a few select good ones . The best way to find out what you might like in a dog is to get out and watch them perform, and or watch them train. Then you should compile a list of traits you'd like in a dog on an aspects of priority. Marking, drive tractability, looks etc. then be ready to wait until you find a breeding of everything you want. Still easier yet buy a started dog that has basics done. That way you start with a solid foundation, a dog that is ready to start hunting, you'll already know the dogs personality type, and you'll be able to grow and continue training together, which is much easier for a newbie when they start with a solid base, rather than attempting to assemble that base yourself.

    Why doesn't this look like it does in the picture? Regards
    Last edited by Hunt'EmUp; 01-12-2014 at 02:08 PM.
    "They's Just DAWGS"
    "Hunting is a skill to be learned whether you do it early or late it still needs to be learned"
    "I train dogs, Not papers"

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  10. #10
    Senior Member Sharon Potter's Avatar
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    As far as pros matching up dogs with amateurs, it isn't much at all like horse showing. In my experience, it's a lot more straightforward without all the "behind the barn" commissions split eight ways from Sunday. It's more like "Hey, a customer of mine has this nice dog for sale, and I'd love to keep it on my truck...here's the price." Commissions are minimal at best, if any.

    And Dr. Ed would be a good person to get to know, too...the resume above is nowhere near up to date.
    Sharon Potter

    www.redbranchkennels.net

    Chesapeake Bay Retrievers...too many to list.

    Team Huntsmith

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