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Thread: To Neuter or not??

  1. #11

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    Does nuetering stop humping? and what age should you nueter? curious

  2. #12
    Senior Member Jerry Beil's Avatar
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    Having the non-descended testicle removed is of benefit to the dog.

    Breeding the dog should be out of the question as this is almost assuredly a genetic issue and one that responsible breeders would and should consider a showstopper.

    Other than that, the benefits of neutering are probably for you not the dog - he won't mark every shrub in sight, and he'll be easier to deal with around other dogs, even if that only means around females in heat.

    I had the same situation. I had them take both when they went in to get the non-descended testicle but that was for my own convenience as I have a female in the house. He was 2 at the time.

    I will say from my own experience with this one dog, that he doesn't seem quite the same since being neutered.

    He gains weight easier and his muscle tone is not as good. He still has excellent drive, but he's just not quite as sharp as we was before on things. If it wasn't for dealing with a female in heat in the same house with an intact male, I'd have left the "good" one. He's always been very laid back in the house and wide open in the field, so I didn't notice any changes around the house, but it would be hard for him to be more laid back at home than he already was.

    The main risk to the dog for keeping him intact is testicular cancer, which is normally pretty easy to find early and pretty easy to deal with. You do need to get the non-descended one out though because from what I have learned, that one will be a problem almost for sure if you don't get it out. There's a lot of information available on the pro's and con's of neutering, but from what I found when considering this with my dog, there are as many or more risks to neutering as there are to leaving him intact.
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  3. #13
    Senior Member Brettttka's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone! I think I will remove the non-descended one but leave the other intact. He has never been a humper and is not aggressive towards other males. Have not had him around any in heat females but he does not run loose and should never be in contact with a female that is in heat.
    Lone Oak's Marley Man.. (My first)

  4. #14
    Senior Member wheelhorse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brettttka View Post
    I think I will remove the non-descended one but leave the other intact.
    You will have a hard time finding a vet that will take only the retained testicle.
    Kathleen

    "Before you diagnose yourself with depression or low self-esteem, first make sure that you're not, in fact, just surrounded by a**holes" -William Gibson

  5. #15
    Senior Member 1st retriever's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wheelhorse View Post
    You will have a hard time finding a vet that will take only the retained testicle.
    True. Usually an all or nothing thing. We groom a dog at work whose retained testicle was up by his heart. So don't be put off by the term "exploratory surgery". It can be anywhere in there.
    Steph

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  6. #16
    Senior Member jecartag's Avatar
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    Here is a link to a very nice paper on Cryptorchidism, or the condition of non-descended testes, written by a veterinary student from UC Davis.

    http://www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/vmth/s...orchidism2.pdf

    As stated in the paper, undescended testes are way more likely (up to 13 times) to become cancerous. Normally, testes are maintained at a lower temperature than the normal body temperature via changes in the scrotum (a loose bag during hot weather, so to speak). This is really important because sperm production is very sensitive to increases in temperature. Since the undescended testicle can't be kept at a lower temp and is at the mercy of the temperature of the abdomen, sperm production will not ever occur in that testicle.

    Also, please understand, as mentioned above, that it will be difficult to find a vet to remove one testicle. This has to do with personal ethics of the veterinarian. That stance is taken for a few reasons; as previously mentioned, Cryptorchidism is an inherited condition, and since the descended testicle maintains some viability or fertilizing capability, it allows the chance of passing along that genetic condition. Another reason would be, just like in people, older, intact male dogs can get prostatic enlargement. Depending on the cause, the treatment can involve castration because it may be hormone related. Another reason is that putting any animal under anesthesia is a risk. Yes, most animals recover from anesthesia just fine. However, if prostatic problems occur down the road, or cancerous changes occur in that testicle that is still left behind, another anesthesia episode will need to be performed in order to remove the said testicle. (I am not by any means referring to cost of multiple procedures; solely the medical risk of anesthesia because the issue of cost is not static between people but the risk of anesthesia is always a concern).

    Also as mentioned above, it is not typical that a dogs personality will change, but he may be more prone to weight gain. If that is the case, decrease calories offered each day to meet his needs so this does not happen to him.

    I really hope this helps. Sorry for the rant; I initially intended to only post the paper but it looks like I got carried away...
    Jeremy
    Kankakee River HRC

  7. #17
    Senior Member EdA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wheelhorse View Post
    You will have a hard time finding a vet that will take only the retained testicle.
    Really, why? Has the profession ceased to provide the service that the client wants?

  8. #18
    Senior Member wheelhorse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdA View Post
    Really, why? Has the profession ceased to provide the service that the client wants?
    When it comes to this, yes.
    Kathleen

    "Before you diagnose yourself with depression or low self-esteem, first make sure that you're not, in fact, just surrounded by a**holes" -William Gibson

  9. #19
    Senior Member Jerry Beil's Avatar
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    I didn't have any trouble at all. I talked to 2 vets about it personally and they were both happy to handle it either way. If the intent was to leave the testicle in order to breed the dog, the vet should probably communicate the concerns with breeding a Chryptorchid. The OP stated that he has no intention of breeding his dog.

    The HSUS and ASPCA have done a good job of brainwashing the population that Spay/Neuter is a the no-brainer way to go.

    While it is true that intact dogs have a higher risk of testicular cancer, and that the risk of testicular cancer in Chrryporchid dogs is higher, testicular cancer usually develops later in life, and diagnosis and treatment is relatively simple. Neutered dogs are at an increased risk of other cancers that develop earlier and are more difficult to diagnose or treat.
    Last edited by Jerry Beil; 02-10-2014 at 09:10 PM.
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    Donway's Dixieland Delight - Dixie 2/24/1997 - 2001
    Rebel's Ruffian Hank - Hank - 6/05/2001 - 2/3/2011 - Profile Picture
    Blue Ridge Pot O Gold - Sťamus - 1/22/2011 -
    Old North State Queen Anne's Revenge- Annie- 3/21/2013-

  10. #20
    Senior Member EdA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wheelhorse View Post
    When it comes to this, yes.
    Must be a regional thing, I have removed the retained and spared the descended several times.

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