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Thread: To Neuter or not??

  1. #21
    Senior Member BobOwens's Avatar
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    I have a 4 year old male that wasn't neutered until about 3. He came up with minor hip dysplasia. I see no difference in his personality or drive in the field. He is the same dog through and through!

    As for the pacing, maybe he needs more stimulation? Does he pace even after a good run or training session? he might just have some pent up energy that needs to be burned. It also could be a bit of an anxiety thing, do you try to snap him out of it when he's pacing? take his mind of it and give him something to do... Try redirecting him when he is showing the behavior, make him heel around the house for a minute, sit, lay down, here, heel... just give him a few quick tasks to think about and it could help! Good luck buddy!
    Bob Owens
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  2. #22
    Senior Member Brettttka's Avatar
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    Yes Bob I do give him other things to do its just his nervous twitch so to speak. That I am not at all concerned about. My main concern is it going to change his drive or personality with being neutered? Some argue the point that yes it will. Some argue the point that no it hasnt changed anything in their dogs. So I guess I could look at it this way. I have a chance to neuter and change his personality or I can leave him intact and take the chance of testicular cancer.
    Lone Oak's Marley Man.. (My first)

  3. #23
    Senior Member RookieTrainer's Avatar
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    I waited until mine was about 2 before having it done. And I only did it because I had to before I could get a registration for him to run hunt test events.

    Didn't seem to affect his drive any. He was prone to break before and he still did it after, and he still runs like his hair is on fire and his rear end is catching. Maybe the breaking has something to do with his idiot trainer/handler?
    Steve Wyatt

    HR Belle's Rolling Big Rig "Jimmy"

  4. #24
    Senior Member Hunt'EmUp's Avatar
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    I'm sure vets will removed just one, but be sure to remind him several times; might write with a marker DON"T REMOVE THIS ONE on the other. Had a couple of friends with a similar condition the vet got in and removed both, after being told just one. Not sure why maybe with so many surgeries they just go into auto pilot. Still I would have the non-descended one removed, too much chance of it causing problems in there.
    Last edited by Hunt'EmUp; 02-11-2014 at 10:15 AM.
    "They's Just DAWGS"
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  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Beil View Post
    The main risk to the dog for keeping him intact is testicular cancer, which is normally pretty easy to find early and pretty easy to deal with. You do need to get the non-descended one out though because from what I have learned, that one will be a problem almost for sure if you don't get it out. There's a lot of information available on the pro's and con's of neutering, but from what I found when considering this with my dog, there are as many or more risks to neutering as there are to leaving him intact.
    Jerry's comment reminds me of a conversation we had with our vet's tech. (It doesn't have anything to do with Jerry's comment to the op specifically).

    Has anybody else noticed that vets frequently use the above underlined statement as a reason for their promoting neutering of perfectly healthy intact dogs? I find this line of reasoning very frustrating because it's not quite true. Testicles in and of themselves aren't going to just magically combust into some nasty tumor if left alone. Normal, healthy, descended testicles don't cause cancer.

    But Vets and techs frequently lead you to believe that if you leave them there, they will. The truth, is that some dogs get cancer, just like some people do. Of the male dogs that get cancerous tumors, 4-7 % of those dogs will have testicular cancer. http://www.vsso.org/Testicular_Tumors.html I wonder what the final percentage of risk actually comes out to be? Maybe less than 1% of all intact dogs across the board? Who knows....

  6. #26
    Senior Member afdahl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
    Jerry's comment reminds me of a conversation we had with our vet's tech. (It doesn't have anything to do with Jerry's comment to the op specifically).

    Has anybody else noticed that vets frequently use the above underlined statement as a reason for their promoting neutering of perfectly healthy intact dogs? I find this line of reasoning very frustrating because it's not quite true. Testicles in and of themselves aren't going to just magically combust into some nasty tumor if left alone. Normal, healthy, descended testicles don't cause cancer.

    But Vets and techs frequently lead you to believe that if you leave them there, they will. The truth, is that some dogs get cancer, just like some people do. Of the male dogs that get cancerous tumors, 4-7 % of those dogs will have testicular cancer. http://www.vsso.org/Testicular_Tumors.html I wonder what the final percentage of risk actually comes out to be? Maybe less than 1% of all intact dogs across the board? Who knows....
    My understanding is that most testicular tumors are benign. If you want to play the odds, keep your dog intact (or if he's cryptorchid, keep the descended one). It's been a bunch of years since the first study came out showing a longer average lifespan for intact males. Since then we've learned a lot about the reasons--conditions that are more prevalent in "neutered" males, from hip dysplasia to osteosarcoma and hemangiosarcoma, canine cognitive dysfunction, prostate cancer, and other conditions.

    Amy Dahl

  7. #27
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    [The HSUS and ASPCA have done a good job of brainwashing the population that Spay/Neuter is a the no-brainer way to go.
    [/QUOTE]

    For careful folks, like most of those on this board, who are responsible and take care of their dogs, staying intact is usually ok. The number of clients I have met who "accidentally" bred their dogs and how stupid they are (They are brother and sister!! I didn't think they would do it!! (True story)) need MORE brainwashing. Shelters are overflowing with dogs because people are not responsible, and altering is the way to go for the majority of these dogs because their people are not responsible enough to care.

    My 2cents,

    Lisa

  8. #28
    Senior Member kelrobin's Avatar
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    I was told by my vet that testicular cancer is really sort of rare in a normal intact male. What they do find is enlarged prostates as the dog gets older. It's usually very treatable....by neutering.

    I would not not hesitate however, in having the retained testicle removed.

  9. #29
    Senior Member afdahl's Avatar
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    Shelters are overflowing with dogs because people are not responsible,
    SOME shelters in some parts of the country take in more dogs than they can handle, and kill the excess. Many shelters are almost empty, and to get enough "product" for their customers who want shelter dogs, they bring them in from out of state, or import street dogs from Puerto Rico or foreign countries. Caveat emptor.

    Amy Dahl
    Last edited by afdahl; 02-12-2014 at 07:35 AM. Reason: fix messed-up quote blocs

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