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Thread: Photographing Dogs in the field

  1. #21
    Senior Member Mountain Duck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rivertrail View Post
    I hate to even ask this when you guys know so much, so I'm going to sound like an idiot, but - How the heck do you keep the dogs eyes looking correct? Every setting I've messed with they still come back glowing. What suggestions can you make to correct this.

    By the way, awesome pictures and advice.
    thanks
    Sounds like you're using a flash? If you're shooting in Auto, often times your camera will pop up the flash automatically. In low light situations, this will lead to cujo eyes. Learn how to turn your flash off, or shoot in a mode that will not pop up the flash. A lot of DSLRs and P&S have a "sports" mode. Try that for a quick fix..

    Fill Flash is good for certain controlled situations, that won't lead to the cujo eyes.
    Wildlife and Outdoor Photography

    http://www.ericrutherford.net

  2. #22
    Senior Member tzappia's Avatar
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    I try to use as little flash as possible. When I shoot I try to have the sun directly behind me thereby allowing the natural light to light up the Doug's eye. When I do need a flash I use a special flash bracket that gets my flash off my camera and high above my lens. That will eliminate "devil" eyes. Sometimes you can get away with a flash diffuser to soften the harsh blast of the flash - which also can be adjusted using the manual controls on most high end flashes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rivertrail View Post
    I hate to even ask this when you guys know so much, so I'm going to sound like an idiot, but - How the heck do you keep the dogs eyes looking correct? Every setting I've messed with they still come back glowing. What suggestions can you make to correct this.

    By the way, awesome pictures and advice.

    thanks
    Tony C. Zappia
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    FTCH Adirondac Tea for Two WC, ** (Tea), 2009 GRCA National Specialty Derby win, Open Win
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  3. #23
    Senior Member HPL's Avatar
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    When shooting action and most wildlife, I shoot almost exclusively aperture priority. I shoot aperture priority because I am usually attempting to achieve the highest shutter speed possible for the existing light and setting the aperture at wide open (or wide open + one stop) ensures that. For shoots like the hunt tests, I generally shoot Jpeg, but for my wildlife and especially for my competition photography, I shoot RAW. I would seldom use flash for outdoor action photography. At the hunt tests, the dogs would mostly have been too far away, and for the dedicated photo sessions, I arrange for the sun to be directly behind me so that it is falling on the dog's face. Flash is the only thing that I can think if that would be giving your dog's eyes that devil glow. That happens when the light from your flash travels through the dog's pupils and then bounces off the tapetum lucidum, reflecting back at the camera. The light rays have to be on the same axis as the camera lens to get the effect, so, like Tony mentioned, there are brackets that allow you to mount a several inches above the lens, thus eliminating the effect. I'll add that most photo-editing software has a built in, one click fix for "red eye" which may fix the eye glow on your dog photos also.
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  4. #24
    Senior Member Handler Error's Avatar
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    I shoot strictly in jpeg and all manual. I am not suggesting someone else not shoot in RAW, but that is what works for me. I prefer the larger burst in jpeg and prefer to edit in PS. Here are a couple of shots that I probably would have missed had I shot in RAW.

    These are low res images so they do not look real sharp on here. Sorry not dog images.




  5. #25
    Senior Member Erik Nilsson's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info guys, sounds like Im on the right path.. I appreciate the comments. Taking photos is addicting.

    One thing I like to do is get out and see if I can get photos of Turkeys in the spring,( Its fun to shoot them with the camera too) I framed these and are hanging on my walls.



    HRC- Our season never ends

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    HR UH Nilsson's on a wing n a prayer SH WCX

  6. #26
    Senior Member Handler Error's Avatar
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    Absolutely beautiful photos Erik!

  7. #27
    Senior Member Mountain Duck's Avatar
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    Nice turkeys! They are sure tough. I was in a treestand deer hunting when a gobbler came out. Waited for him to go behind a thick cedar before moving. Raised the camera. When he stepped out I pressed the shutter to initiate focus. He heard the lens mechanism focusing! Put! Gone!
    Wildlife and Outdoor Photography

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  8. #28
    Senior Member Erik Nilsson's Avatar
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    Thanks, its a bit of luck, good light and being in the right spot at the right time.


    Hey! Question, Anyone doing any HDR work?
    HRC- Our season never ends

    "Shoot fast or shoot last"

    HR UH Nilsson's on a wing n a prayer SH WCX

  9. #29
    Senior Member suepuff's Avatar
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    Beginner photographer here. What is the difference between RAW and Aperture? Is shutter speed that much slower on Raw than JPEG?

    I have one of the newer Canons. Learning from my husband, but you guys can be a bit more patient!

    Relatively newbie here. Went from a great point and shoot to an awesome camera. Not wanting to be a pro, just take better action shots.

    Sue
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  10. #30
    Senior Member Todd Caswell's Avatar
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    Raw is a file type as is Jpeg,

    A camera raw image file contains minimally processed data from the image sensor of either a digital camera, image scanner, or motion picture film scanner.[1] Raw files are named so because they are not yet processed and therefore are not ready to be printed or edited with a bitmap graphics editor. Normally, the image is processed by a raw converter in a wide-gamut internal colorspace where precise adjustments can be made before conversion to a "positive" file format such as TIFF or JPEG for storage, printing, or further manipulation, which often encodes the image in a device-dependent colorspace. There are dozens if not hundreds of raw formats in use by different models of digital equipment (like cameras or film scanners)

    Aperture

    In optics, an aperture is a hole or an opening through which light travels. More specifically, the aperture of an optical system is the opening that determines the cone angle of a bundle of rays that come to a focus in the image plane. The aperture determines how collimated the admitted rays are, which is of great importance for the appearance at the image plane.[2] If an aperture is narrow, then highly collimated rays are admitted, resulting in a sharp focus at the image plane. If an aperture is wide, then uncollimated rays are admitted, resulting in a sharp focus only for rays with a certain focal length. This means that a wide aperture results in an image that is sharp around what the lens is focusing on and blurred otherwise. The aperture also determines how many of the incoming rays are actually admitted and thus how much light reaches the image plane (the narrower the aperture, the darker the image for a given exposure time). In the human eye, the pupil is the aperture.

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