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Thread: Photographing Dogs in the field

  1. #31
    Senior Member HPL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by suepuff View Post
    Beginner photographer here. What is the difference between RAW and Aperture? Is shutter speed that much slower on Raw than JPEG?

    I have one of the newer Canons. Learning from my husband, but you guys can be a bit more patient!

    Relatively newbie here. Went from a great point and shoot to an awesome camera. Not wanting to be a pro, just take better action shots.

    Sue

    You are conflating two entirely, unrelated things. There are two ways that your camera can record your images. RAW simply records 1's and 0's with NO in camera processing of the information. RAW records and keeps ALL the image data that falls on the sensor. Jpeg is the other option and comes in several levels of compression. When you shoot jpeg, the camera does some non-removable "adjusting" of the image data. It will compress the data some (which involves in discarding some of the information originally recorded by the sensor). The camera will also apply some color correction (white balance) and some sharpening in jpeg. If you shoot in RAW you may have to apply some color correction (but since you have ALL the data, you can adjust white balance in post processing very easily) and in RAW you WILL have to do some sharpening in post processing. There a pros and cons to both RAW and jpeg.

    Aperture, as you have been reading it on this thread refers to which exposure functions are set by the photographer and which are set by the camera. In Aperture (preferred) which is designated AV on a Canon camera, the photographer sets the aperture (F:stop) and the camera will choose an appropriate shutter speed for the light conditions and chosen ISO. The other primary choices are Tv which is Shutter preferred, in which the photographer chooses the shutter speed, and the camera will then choose the aperture (F:stop), Program, usually designated by a P, in which the photographer allows the camera to choose both shutter speed and aperture,and Manual, designated M in which the photographer chooses both shutter speed and aperture.

    At any given ISO it takes a set amount of light striking the sensor to achieve a correct exposure. As the ISO goes up, the sensitivity of the sensor also increases. Double the ISO from 200 to 400 and it takes half as much light to give you a correct exposure. Double it again to 800 and you halve the necessary amount of light again, and so on.

    To achieve that correct exposure, the camera has two controls. The shutter speed determines how long the sensor is exposed to light, and the aperture determines how big a hole the light passes through. Aperture is exactly what it sounds like, an opening in the center of the lens. The opening consists of moveable blades which can constrict of open up to decrease or increase the amount of light that passes through the lens in a set period of time. F: numbers are the denominator of a fraction with "1" being the numerator and when you move across the aperture scale by a whole stop, the area of the opening changes by a factor of two thus either letting in twice or half the amount of light in a given amount of time. Whole F:stops are 1, 1.4, 2.0, 2.8, 4, 5.6, 8.0, 11, 16, 22, 32...... Change from F:2.8 to F:4 and the aperture will allow 1/2 the light through in a given amount of time.

    The shutter opens and closes to expose the sensor to light, much like you would open or close shutters on a window to either let light in or block it out. Shutter speed is expressed as whole numbers (15, 30, 60, 120 for example) which are actually the denominator of a a fraction where the numerator is "1" and refer to a fraction of a second, thus a shutter speed of 120 is, in fact 1/120, so the larger the number, the less time the shutter is open. The shutter and aperture act in opposition to achieve a correct exposure. By that I mean that IF your correct exposure is 250 (actually 1/250) at F:8, you get the same amount of light striking the sensor at 1/125 @ F:11, or 1/500 @ F:5.6

    Clear as mud??


    Sorry, Todd and I must have been typing at the same time.
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  2. #32
    Senior Member suepuff's Avatar
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    Todd and Hugh,

    Thanks! Those explanations are awesome! Still a little muddy, but now much clearer!
    Sue Puffenbarger
    Wirtz, VA
    www.boynelabradors.com

  3. #33
    Senior Member HNTFSH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HPL View Post
    All good points, but the PM specifically wanted me to address equipment and it is my impression that few realize that a new 300mm F:2.8 lens is going to set them back, what, about $6000.00 and a new 600mm (thank heavens I've had mine for about 10 yrs) around $12,000.00. That is why I suggested one of the more advanced Point and Shoots. Fortunately lots of dog events run in BRIGHT light so the really fast lenses, although very nice, are not as necessary as in some areas of photography. Technique another discussion entirely.
    It's brave work encouraging P@S for such activity. Depends on the expected outcome. Photos like presentations have two components. A. Form. B. Content.

    A lot of folks are happy with B. Content, the 'neat' subject. Can't take the image to 11x14 on a nice print but in 5x7 or 8x10 in a photo it looks reasonable nice.

    Form is the difference. That's where the investment gives the output clarity and flexibility. As long as the Photog truly understands the difference the mission is realistic.
    We shoot dogs with a Canon

  4. #34
    Senior Member HPL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HNTFSH View Post
    It's brave work encouraging P@S for such activity. Depends on the expected outcome. Photos like presentations have two components. A. Form. B. Content.

    A lot of folks are happy with B. Content, the 'neat' subject. Can't take the image to 11x14 on a nice print but in 5x7 or 8x10 in a photo it looks reasonable nice.

    Form is the difference. That's where the investment gives the output clarity and flexibility. As long as the Photog truly understands the difference the mission is realistic.
    Oh, I don't know. Two or three years ago Joel Sartore called me because he was passing through our area on a National Geographic assignment and he heard that I had very dependable Painted Buntings. He spent the afternoon with me at one of my photo sites attempting to get a very specific photo. He was using a Canon G-9 or G-11, a high end point and shoot. Many of the upper end P@S cameras have more pixels than the 30D's I shoot and I regularly have 24X30's made. Granted, I am using superior optics, but how many folks on this forum who are just looking to get some nice photos of their dogs to show friends or post to the web want to spend upwards of $5,000.00+ on a system? Under good conditions, the better P@S cameras are capable of producing images at least equal to what one will get from a consumer DSLR and a "kit" lens. In my PM reply to the original query, I did consider the DSLR with top line optics option but also mentioned that a high end P@S might also be a viable choice.
    I don't own a P@S yet myself, but it is on my wish list.
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  5. #35
    Senior Member Todd Caswell's Avatar
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    how many folks on this forum who are just looking to get some nice photos of their dogs to show friends or post to the web want to spend upwards of $5,000.00+ on a system?
    A used 30D and a used 70-200 F/4 non IS can be had for under $700.00 pretty nice setup. In Jan. I picked up a 30D with 800 clicks on it for $175.00

  6. #36
    Senior Member HPL's Avatar
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    Wow! Nice to know I'm not the only one still shooting a 30D. I also mentioned the used option in my initial reply to the PM. HOw do you find the total # of cycles on a 30D?
    Any doctrine that weakens personal responsibility for judgment and for action helps create the attitudes that welcome and support the totalitarian state.
    (John Dewey)

    Associate yourself with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation; for 'tis better to be alone than in bad company.
    (George Washington)

    Gig'em Aggies!! BTCO'77HOO t.u.!!

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  7. #37
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    Wow this thread is incredible. Thanks guys.

    So I've been using a Nikon P520 - it has manual mode etc but I've basically been leaving it on f/3.0 and ISO 80. For action shots is appears I need to significantly increase the ISO and then will it automatically adjust the F stop or will I need to change that as well? Maybe that just depends on the camera.

    Thanks for all the advice.

  8. #38
    Senior Member Todd Caswell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HPL View Post
    Wow! Nice to know I'm not the only one still shooting a 30D. I also mentioned the used option in my initial reply to the PM. HOw do you find the total # of cycles on a 30D?

    Tokk the guys word for it, he had had the same flash card in it the whole time and never deleted any pictures, it was spotless. But they can be found for $200-250 all day long.

  9. #39
    Senior Member HPL's Avatar
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    I am not specifically acquainted with that camera, but if you keep the camera settings such that YOU choose the aperture and the camera chooses the shutter speed (which is what it sounds like you are currently doing) then raising your ISO will NOT affect the aperture (F stop) but WILL increase your shutter speed and it sounds like a faster shutter is probably what you are looking for.
    Any doctrine that weakens personal responsibility for judgment and for action helps create the attitudes that welcome and support the totalitarian state.
    (John Dewey)

    Associate yourself with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation; for 'tis better to be alone than in bad company.
    (George Washington)

    Gig'em Aggies!! BTCO'77HOO t.u.!!

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  10. #40
    Senior Member HPL's Avatar
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    I'm currently hanging on for the rumored 7D replacement. Did just have the shutter mechanisms replaced in both my 30D's after about 90,000 cycles each. Was really hoping to be able to hold on for the aforementioned 7D, but...............
    Any doctrine that weakens personal responsibility for judgment and for action helps create the attitudes that welcome and support the totalitarian state.
    (John Dewey)

    Associate yourself with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation; for 'tis better to be alone than in bad company.
    (George Washington)

    Gig'em Aggies!! BTCO'77HOO t.u.!!

    www.HughLieck.photoshelter.com

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