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Thread: Chessie Pup Help!

  1. #21
    Senior Member Dave Flint's Avatar
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    Every 5 -6 month old pup I’ve owned has been a PITA. They’re teenagers. They think they’re independent & they haven’t been taught any responsibility yet. They can however tell if you don’t like them so don’t let your pre-conceived notions about the Chesapeake temperament affect your future relationship.

    Dogs “bond” with their masters because they accept them as their leader, protector, & the bringer of good things. They lose respect when you give them treats or praise they haven’t earned. At this stage, you should be mostly concerned about avoiding bad behavior. That’s what the long line is for.

    Since she drops the dummy when you pull her in, try throwing a clip wing pigeon. In many cases, the introduction to birds has made a noticeable difference in how the pup sees me. It’s like a switch goes off & they view you with a whole different attitude.
    Last edited by Dave Flint; 03-07-2014 at 04:33 PM.
    "The bird hunter watches only the dog, and always knows where the dog is, whether or not visible at the moment. The dog’ nose is the bird hunters eye. Many hunters who carry a shotgun in season have never learned to watch the dog, or interpret his reaction to scent."
    Aldo Leopold, Round River

  2. #22
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    Rick and Patty Roberts are high level pros
    There is also Ed Fory. Field trial end of March in
    Trapp Maryland. Take a peak might see Tim there
    Running Tanner a done or two more chessies
    Gentle in what you do. Firm in how you do it.

    CH SILVERCREEK MURRAY SAMUEL (MURRAY) WDQ CGC MH *** 2/16/00 - 12/26/12
    WESTWIND WHISPERING COVE (LARRY son of Murray) WDQ MH ***
    LPK DELAWARE RIVER WHISPERING COVE **(SAVAGE SAM son of FC Chester MH)
    WESTWIND WHISPERING COVE JAY ** ( Larry's son and Murray's grandson)

  3. #23
    Senior Member dlsweep's Avatar
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    Lots of good advice here. Especially jd6400.

    You need to own the pups actions, and stop thinking in stereotypes. Train the dog in front of you.

    Best of luck.

  4. #24
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    Just a duck hunter and only on my 4th Chessie (3rd pup) so no expert. But they learn fast and unlearn slow. Especially when you teach them the wrong thing. Work on Obedience, especially "come". Get "come" solid before you try and work on real retrieving. In the meantime, if you want to throw stuff for the puppy for exercise, make it a ball or toy, not a bumper, wing or other training object. Praise her if she brings it back. If she doesn't, cajole her, run the other way and try and get her to chase you, but don't chase her. But until "come" is solid, don't use the word unless you can enforce it. And the ones I've had seem to do better when you don't nag. (come! once and make them do it, not "come!...come!....c'mere....comecome.....) Not saying that's what you're doing, but just in case

    Also doesn't sound like a drive problem, more of a focus/direction problem. Probably want to Teach "fetch" and "hold" before doing formal force fetch, and if you're at all unsure finding someone who's successfully forced Chessies before is probably a real good idea.

    They really do want to please once they're sure they know what you want.
    Art

  5. #25
    Senior Member afdahl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HoytHunt View Post
    It's kind of a lonely road with Chessie's I guess. Labs are your buddy but this particular Chessie is in it purely for her own gain.
    I know it looks this way to you now, but your Chesapeake has the potential to bond with you in a way that will probably surpass anything you and your husband have known.

    I strongly encourage you to get in-person help from Julie, Tim, or one of the other good people in your area. There is a knack to bringing out the best in a Chesapeake. While we talk about the need for them to "respect" you, it is not simply a matter of obedience training or (god forbid) "dominance" exercises. NILIF is probably the most helpful of the protocols you might apply on your own.

    My experience, as a pro who owns, campaigns, and breeds Chesapeakes and also gets a lot of them in training, is that it is very common for youngsters to seem independent, unwilling to the point of defiance, and sometimes so creative in coming up with activities that get a reaction that their owners describe them as "demonic." Sometimes owners come to me after being told by trainers who don't know the breed that their dog is an untrainable pathological problem. The right kind of training wakes up a desire to cooperate and work as a team. In my experience, contrary to Jim's, once the dog has really enjoyed teamwork with one person (me, the trainer), it readily transfers its willingness to cooperate to the owner. Often the dog seems to be bursting with eagerness to share with the owner the new things it has learned. I do, of course, spend time coaching owners but do not have to ask them to make huge changes in how they do things, usually just a few key tips.

    The "uncooperative," "unwilling," "stubborn," "independent," "dominant" behavior does NOT indicate a dog that is intentionally trying to be difficult. It is one possible default for an intelligent, curious, driven youngster with a curious mix of seriousness and humor and a love for games. Once you show yours how rewarding teamwork can be, she will radiate her joy in working with you in a way you will tangibly feel.

    So please, don't give up, and don't fall into the trap of developing a negative view and expectations of your pup. Please do get the kind of help that will turn her around from one of the experienced Chesapeake people in your area.

    Amy Dahl

  6. #26
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    What Amy said! I have raised MANY Chessie pups - some were easy and some not. My most recent was a REAL brat from a very young age and there was a long period of time where she and I did not like each other much (or so it seemed). She did not start to really come around until after all her basics done at 1 1/2 or so - she has now developed into quite a nice dog and I enjoy working with her and she with me. Each and every pup is different and this does not apply just to Chessies - there are Lab and Golden brats too. So, get some good assistance, do what needs to be done and hang in there!
    Diane

  7. #27
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    I studied up on NILF and worked with her all day while I was home and when I couldn't watch her I kenneled her. By the time my husband got back from work and took her out to retriever her I felt I could already see some progress. He commented that she was better tonight when he returned from working her outside!

    I've gotten quite a bit of good info. and feel much better about our little girl.

  8. #28
    Senior Member Pam Spears's Avatar
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    Glad to hear you're seeing progress. Keep it up indefinitely and you won't believe the difference it makes. I forgot to mention in my earlier post that my "difficult" girl, for most of her first year, was independent and aloof. She didn't want to snuggle and cuddle, didn't like to be held, and in fact didn't seem to like us all that much. She is now "my" dog in a way that I've never experienced a dog before. It's amazing, and really wonderful.

    If you get a chance, you might seek out the book "The Ten Minute Retriever." Written by Amy Dahl (post above) and her husband, it's a great introduction to chessie training and the chessie mentality. The anecdotal stories in there will give you a chuckle and help put your own relationship with your pup in perspective.
    Pam
    HR Roughwater Stacked & Packed, "Babe," MH, CD, RN, CGC, WDQ

  9. #29

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    Hello all,


    I'm the other half.


    The pup is in a very precocious stage right now, but she'll be a great dog. I can still see that even when frustrated. I like a stubborn dog because they just keep going when it gets tough, but they'll give you ulcers until they start to come together. I had hoped to have her loving a simple, uncomplicated game of fetch before I started FF. I hate to rely on negative reinforcement, to include this dang check cord, just to get her to bring a bumper to hand this early, but I acknowledge that CC & FF are probably the quickest way to address my current issue and she has the drive and the teeth (earlier than expected), so I'll jump into that very soon. Some of my hesitation is due to kicking myself because I screwed up. Her obedience was great and she was retrieving an old glove like a champ and was transitioning to dummies reasonably quickly...


    ...and then I introduced wings too early. Once she discovered "tasty morsels" on her dummies, the game changed from "fetch" to "get it and keep it". I d/c'd the wings, but now I have to get her past the "come get me" phase I created (no, I didn't/don't chase the pup). Her basic obedience is still great until she has a dummy in her mouth. She is coming around quickly with the check cord, but Katy hears me mutter, fuss and cuss a good bit because this pup doesn't work for praise, treats or the next retrieve and I am pissed I have to resort to a check cord at all. The pup will come around; it'll just take longer than I am used to. My old girl spoiled me rotten because she learned so incredibly quickly and easily, but I muttered and cussed from time to time while training her and also the one before that and even more the one before that. It is part of my learning process. I got a Chessie to learn something difference and I am getting my money's worth.


    I'll be playing the hunter retriever games in the Maryland/Virginia area (I don't have the attention span for field trialling). I look forward to seeing you all around.


    Nate

  10. #30
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    Remember stubborn could be confused for not
    Understanding what you want. Chessies are not
    The fastest learners they really need to understand
    Gentle in what you do. Firm in how you do it.

    CH SILVERCREEK MURRAY SAMUEL (MURRAY) WDQ CGC MH *** 2/16/00 - 12/26/12
    WESTWIND WHISPERING COVE (LARRY son of Murray) WDQ MH ***
    LPK DELAWARE RIVER WHISPERING COVE **(SAVAGE SAM son of FC Chester MH)
    WESTWIND WHISPERING COVE JAY ** ( Larry's son and Murray's grandson)

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